Visual Art Online Senior Marker Task

The Online Senior Marker Task is a key aspect of the senior marker application process and must be completed. It should take about 30 – 40 minutes.

Course materials

Personal statement 1

Senior markers are required to mark to the highest level of accuracy, ensure marker reliability and provide feedback to markers. Some senior markers will be required to deliver training.

Explain how your relevant experience adds value to the role of senior marker. (300 words)

Personal statement 2

Describe what you believe are the critical aspects of External assessment marking and how senior markers play a part in this system. (100 words)

Background

This task will focus on identifying evidence of Appraising in responses to the sample instrument provided in the Supplementary materials from the 2017 External Assessment Trial for Visual Art.

Students are required to:

  • Write an essay of approximately 600-800 words that answers one of two questions.
  • Select two artworks from the stimulus book.
  • Justify their viewpoint in response to the question with direct reference to, and discussion of, the selected artworks. 

Question

How do artists of the two selected artworks use familiar subject matter to visually represent and communicate a more complex conceptual meaning?

Response

The artworks selected are Zucchini flowers II by John Honeywill, and Margaret Olley by Ben Quilty. (Images 5 and 7 in the Stimulus book, Supplementary materials)

The complete response below relates to Activity 1, 2 and 3.  



John Honeywill and Ben Quilty have both made artworks using familiar subject matter, each expressing something more than what each work just visually represents. Honeywill and Quilty have focused on the personal context to express their emotional connection, and each communicates a considered respect for their subject in the artwork Zucchini flowers 11’ and ‘Margaret Olley’ respectively.

In ‘Zucchini flowers 11’, Honeywill paints a realistic still life collection of everyday objects. The significant part of the composition is three zucchini, still with their flowers attached, sitting in a blue cup. The cup sits on a lighter blue table in the middle of the painting. The zucchini’s are painted deep green with touches of a lighter green and yellow at the base of the flowers blending to a deep warm yellow to orange at the upper part of the flowers. At the very top, the realistic detail is painted with a more intense orange and appears to capture a moment just before the flowers open. Honeywill paints swirling lines to represent the shape of the flowers which lead our eyes up to the very top of this part of the subject matter.

In contrast, the change of angles around the cup look hard-edged compared to the softness of the flowers. These angles are revealed through the contrasting light tones and shades of blue, creating highlights that give the cup its form and shape. The zucchinis look fresh and young, as if they have just been picked from the vegetable garden.

Honeywill has painted the rest of the composition, the background, in lighter tones of blue and cream. The repetition of colour throughout the still life contribute to the general harmony in this composition. The selection and use of colour creates a sense of calm and serenity around the objects as they sit isolated within the painting. The surrounding space of these central objects is only disturbed by their shadows reflected on the bench surface, adding to the three dimensional quality of the work. The light and shade, shadows and highlights that Honeywill has added to all parts of the painting and contribute to the impression that we are looking at a private moment between the objects themselves. Honeywill refers to still life as expressing the ‘intimate world’ and ‘quiet visual conversations’ www.johnhoneywill.com. This is clear in the way he has placed the still life within the space of this small painting, the realistic detail and use of colour that show the objects as they sit quietly together, left alone only for Honeywill to show them to us.

Ben Quilty won the Archibald prize with his portrait of ‘Margaret Olley’. This painting is on a large canvas and he uses strong mark making with thickly applied paint. Quilty manipulates and forms these strokes of paint to highlight and construct the shape and features of Olley’s face, her hat and the little we can see of her clothing.

He establishes Olley’s eyes as the focal point, as they look with interest straight out beyond the viewer. The composition and colours are used to communicate something that he knows and feels about her, the vibrant interest she has in life.

Olley’s face dominates the composition space which also includes a little section of her hat, her shoulders and her top, all extending beyond the edges and frame of the painting. Quilty has used warm colours in the details around her face, upper part of the body and hair, with a touch of blue to suggest the very limited background.

Olley is portrayed as bright and alive through the use of white for most of her face, details and features in pink, orange and greys with minimal brown.

Quilty uses darker colours only to represent the shadows to the side of the composition and under her hat, so the overall painting is still very light and bright.

Margaret Ollley and Ben Quilty were friends and in this portrait he has expressed his impression of her personality through colour and composition.

Ben Quilty and John Honeywill have both made a painting about their subject that expresses something more than just the subject matter. As a personal interpretation, each has communicated the qualities of their subject. Quilty has shown us the larger-than-life personality of a woman he greatly respects. Honeywill has shown us the very quiet and personal space in which this still life exists.

Activity 1

Response

The same response has been included below.

The artworks selected are Zucchini flowers II by John Honeywill, and Margaret Olley by Ben Quilty. (Images 5 and 7 in the Stimulus book, Supplementary materials)

 

John Honeywill and Ben Quilty have both made artworks using familiar subject matter, each expressing something more than what each work just visually represents. Honeywill and Quilty have focused on the personal context to express their emotional connection, and each communicates a considered respect for their subject in the artwork ‘Zucchini flowers 11’ and ‘Margaret Olley’ respectively.

In ‘Zucchini flowers 11’, Honeywill paints a realistic still life collection of everyday objects. The significant part of the composition are three zucchinis, still with their flowers attached, sitting in a blue cup. The cup sits on a lighter blue table in the middle of the painting. The zucchinis are painted deep green with touches of a lighter green and yellow at the base of the flowers blending to a deep warm yellow to orange at the upper part of the flowers. At the very top, the realistic detail is painted with a more intense orange and appears to capture a moment just before the flowers open. Honeywill paints swirling lines to represent the shape of the flowers which lead our eye up to the very top of this part of the subject matter.

In contrast, the change of angles around the cup look hard-edged compared to the softness of the flowers. These angles are revealed through the contrasting light tones and shades of blue, creating highlights that give the cup its form and shape. The zucchinis look fresh and young, as if they have just been picked from the vegetable garden.

Honeywill has painted the rest of the composition, the background, in lighter tones of blue and cream. The repetition of colour throughout the still life contribute to the general harmony in this composition. The selection and use of colour creates a sense of calm and serenity around the objects as they sit isolated within the painting. The surrounding space of these central objects is only disturbed by their shadows reflected on the bench surface, adding to the three dimensional quality of the work. The light and shade, shadows and highlights that Honeywill has added to all parts of the painting and contribute to the impression that we are looking at a private moment between the objects themselves. Honeywill refers to still life as expressing the ‘intimate world’ and ‘quiet visual conversations’ www.johnhoneywill.com. This is clear in the way he has placed the still life within the space of this small painting, the realistic detail and use of colour that show the objects as they sit quietly together, left alone only for Honeywill to show them to us.

Ben Quilty won the Archibald prize with his portrait of ‘Margaret Olley’. This painting is on a large canvas and he uses strong mark making with thickly applied paint. Quilty manipulates and forms these strokes of paint to highlight and construct the shape and features of Olley’s face, her hat and the little we can see of her clothing.

He establishes Olley’s eyes as the focal point, as they look with interest straight out beyond the viewer. The composition and colours are used to communicate something that he knows and feels about her, the vibrant interest she has in life.

Olley’s face dominates the composition space which also includes a little section of her hat, her shoulders and her top, all extending beyond the edges and frame of the painting. Quilty has used warm colours in the details around her face, upper part of the body and hair, with a touch of blue to suggest the very limited background.

Olley is portrayed as bright and alive through the use of white for most of her face, details and features in pink, orange and greys with minimal brown.

Quilty uses darker colours only to represent the shadows to the side of the composition and under her hat, so the overall painting is still very light and bright.

Margaret Ollley and Ben Quilty were friends and in this portrait he has expressed his impression of her personality through colour and composition.

Ben Quilty and John Honeywill have both made a painting about their subject that expresses something more than just the subject matter. As a personal interpretation, each has communicated the qualities of their subject. Quilty has shown us the larger-than-life personality of a woman he greatly respects. Honeywill has shown us the very quiet and personal space in which this still life exists.

 

Activity

Select the best match to complete the stem below, then justify your decision. (100 words)

 

With reference to the question, the response:

(A) synthesises ideas in relation to a given viewpoint.

(B) justifies the given viewpoint.

(C) includes an opinion with reference to the artworks.

Activity 2

Response

The same response has been included below.

The artworks selected are Zucchini flowers II by John Honeywill, and Margaret Olley by Ben Quilty. (Images 5 and 7 in the Stimulus book, Supplementary materials)

 

John Honeywill and Ben Quilty have both made artworks using familiar subject matter, each expressing something more than what each work just visually represents. Honeywill and Quilty have focused on the personal context to express their emotional connection, and each communicates a considered respect for their subject in the artwork ‘Zucchini flowers 11’ and ‘Margaret Olley’ respectively.

In ‘Zucchini flowers 11’, Honeywill paints a realistic still life collection of everyday objects. The significant part of the composition are three zucchinis, still with their flowers attached, sitting in a blue cup. The cup sits on a lighter blue table in the middle of the painting. The zucchinis are painted deep green with touches of a lighter green and yellow at the base of the flowers blending to a deep warm yellow to orange at the upper part of the flowers. At the very top, the realistic detail is painted with a more intense orange and appears to capture a moment just before the flowers open. Honeywill paints swirling lines to represent the shape of the flowers which lead our eye up to the very top of this part of the subject matter.

In contrast, the change of angles around the cup look hard-edged compared to the softness of the flowers. These angles are revealed through the contrasting light tones and shades of blue, creating highlights that give the cup its form and shape. The zucchinis look fresh and young, as if they have just been picked from the vegetable garden.

Honeywill has painted the rest of the composition, the background, in lighter tones of blue and cream. The repetition of colour throughout the still life contribute to the general harmony in this composition. The selection and use of colour creates a sense of calm and serenity around the objects as they sit isolated within the painting. The surrounding space of these central objects is only disturbed by their shadows reflected on the bench surface, adding to the three dimensional quality of the work. The light and shade, shadows and highlights that Honeywill has added to all parts of the painting and contribute to the impression that we are looking at a private moment between the objects themselves. Honeywill refers to still life as expressing the ‘intimate world’ and ‘quiet visual conversations’ www.johnhoneywill.com. This is clear in the way he has placed the still life within the space of this small painting, the realistic detail and use of colour that show the objects as they sit quietly together, left alone only for Honeywill to show them to us.

Ben Quilty won the Archibald prize with his portrait of ‘Margaret Olley’. This painting is on a large canvas and he uses strong mark making with thickly applied paint. Quilty manipulates and forms these strokes of paint to highlight and construct the shape and features of Olley’s face, her hat and the little we can see of her clothing.

He establishes Olley’s eyes as the focal point, as they look with interest straight out beyond the viewer. The composition and colours are used to communicate something that he knows and feels about her, the vibrant interest she has in life.

Olley’s face dominates the composition space which also includes a little section of her hat, her shoulders and her top, all extending beyond the edges and frame of the painting. Quilty has used warm colours in the details around her face, upper part of the body and hair, with a touch of blue to suggest the very limited background.

Olley is portrayed as bright and alive through the use of white for most of her face, details and features in pink, orange and greys with minimal brown.

Quilty uses darker colours only to represent the shadows to the side of the composition and under her hat, so the overall painting is still very light and bright.

Margaret Ollley and Ben Quilty were friends and in this portrait he has expressed his impression of her personality through colour and composition.

Ben Quilty and John Honeywill have both made a painting about their subject that expresses something more than just the subject matter. As a personal interpretation, each has communicated the qualities of their subject. Quilty has shown us the larger-than-life personality of a woman he greatly respects. Honeywill has shown us the very quiet and personal space in which this still life exists.

 

Activity

Select the best match to complete the stem below, then justify your decision. (100 words)

 

With reference to the question, the response:

(A) analyses and interprets visual language and expression.

(B) analyses visual language and expression.

(C) describes artworks.

Activity 3

Response

The same response has been included below.

The artworks selected are Zucchini flowers II by John Honeywill, and Margaret Olley by Ben Quilty. (Images 5 and 7 in the Stimulus book, Supplementary materials)

John Honeywill and Ben Quilty have both made artworks using familiar subject matter, each expressing something more than what each work just visually represents. Honeywill and Quilty have focused on the personal context to express their emotional connection, and each communicates a considered respect for their subject in the artwork ‘Zucchini flowers 11’ and ‘Margaret Olley’ respectively.

In ‘Zucchini flowers 11’, Honeywill paints a realistic still life collection of everyday objects. The significant part of the composition are three zucchinis, still with their flowers attached, sitting in a blue cup. The cup sits on a lighter blue table in the middle of the painting. The zucchinis are painted deep green with touches of a lighter green and yellow at the base of the flowers blending to a deep warm yellow to orange at the upper part of the flowers. At the very top, the realistic detail is painted with a more intense orange and appears to capture a moment just before the flowers open. Honeywill paints swirling lines to represent the shape of the flowers which lead our eye up to the very top of this part of the subject matter.

In contrast, the change of angles around the cup look hard-edged compared to the softness of the flowers. These angles are revealed through the contrasting light tones and shades of blue, creating highlights that give the cup its form and shape. The zucchinis look fresh and young, as if they have just been picked from the vegetable garden.

Honeywill has painted the rest of the composition, the background, in lighter tones of blue and cream. The repetition of colour throughout the still life contribute to the general harmony in this composition. The selection and use of colour creates a sense of calm and serenity around the objects as they sit isolated within the painting. The surrounding space of these central objects is only disturbed by their shadows reflected on the bench surface, adding to the three dimensional quality of the work. The light and shade, shadows and highlights that Honeywill has added to all parts of the painting and contribute to the impression that we are looking at a private moment between the objects themselves. Honeywill refers to still life as expressing the ‘intimate world’ and ‘quiet visual conversations’ www.johnhoneywill.com. This is clear in the way he has placed the still life within the space of this small painting, the realistic detail and use of colour that show the objects as they sit quietly together, left alone only for Honeywill to show them to us.

Ben Quilty won the Archibald prize with his portrait of ‘Margaret Olley’. This painting is on a large canvas and he uses strong mark making with thickly applied paint. Quilty manipulates and forms these strokes of paint to highlight and construct the shape and features of Olley’s face, her hat and the little we can see of her clothing.

He establishes Olley’s eyes as the focal point, as they look with interest straight out beyond the viewer. The composition and colours are used to communicate something that he knows and feels about her, the vibrant interest she has in life.

Olley’s face dominates the composition space which also includes a little section of her hat, her shoulders and her top, all extending beyond the edges and frame of the painting. Quilty has used warm colours in the details around her face, upper part of the body and hair, with a touch of blue to suggest the very limited background.

Olley is portrayed as bright and alive through the use of white for most of her face, details and features in pink, orange and greys with minimal brown.

Quilty uses darker colours only to represent the shadows to the side of the composition and under her hat, so the overall painting is still very light and bright.

Margaret Ollley and Ben Quilty were friends and in this portrait he has expressed his impression of her personality through colour and composition.

Ben Quilty and John Honeywill have both made a painting about their subject that expresses something more than just the subject matter. As a personal interpretation, each has communicated the qualities of their subject. Quilty has shown us the larger-than-life personality of a woman he greatly respects. Honeywill has shown us the very quiet and personal space in which this still life exists.

 

Activity

Select the best match to complete the stem below, then justify your decision. (100 words)

 

With reference to the question, the response has evidence of:

(A) how the use of media/medium, techniques or processes, communicate the concept and context.

(B) analysis of visual language and expression.

(C) descriptions of artworks.

Activity 4

Response

An excerpt of a different response to Activity 3 has been included below.

 

…Honeywill has used a strong light source, from the left, outside the frame. He has painted highlights, reflections, tonal changes and a cast shadow to define the edges and three-dimensional form of the cup, the organic roundness of the vegetables and their detailed flowers.

The repetition of line and curves in the cup and zucchinis draw our eyes around and up to the orange tip of their beautifully formed flowers. This use of orange complements the blue in the lower part of the composition. Similarly, the warm oranges of the flowers and cool blues of the cup are blended and mirrored in paler tones in the background of the painting, drawing the overall composition together. Within the confines of a small canvas, Honeywill has created a sense of private space around these objects.

Honeywill describes still life as linking the 'intimate world with the public [world]' (www.johnhoneywill.com), suggesting that each familiar object within a still life composition has a personal connection. This is revealed to the audience through an intimate observation of his surroundings...

 

Activity

Markers were required to select the best match to complete the stem below.

 

With reference to the question, the response has evidence of:

(A) how the use of media/medium, techniques or processes  communicate the concept and context.

(B) a connection between the media/medium, techniques or processes and the concept and context.

(C) the concept meaning and the context are clear.

 

A marker has incorrectly selected (B) as the best match.  

As a senior marker, you will be required to provide feedback to markers.

In your feedback, identify the option that best matches the evidence in the response. Explain to the marker why it is the best match. (100 words)

Activity 5

Response

An excerpt of a different response to Activity 4 has been included below.

 

…While this painting looks to be made haphazardly, Quilty uses an impasto technique to describe and give form to Olley’s face and clothing in a deliberate way.

The small amount of blue in an otherwise warm colour scheme has been used to separate Olley’s face from the limited background to the left side of the composition. Using various shades of red and orange, Quilty paints her facial features and shadows, in stark contrast to the bright white on the rest of her face. This brightness draws our attention to the qualities of her face, so that Olley’s age and strong sense of self are evident in this slightly abstracted form. When making this work, Quilty responded to the fullness of Margaret Olley’s character and surroundings and the intimacy of their friendship. The influence of her personal context is revealed in his decisions about colour, composition and painting technique…

 

Activity

Markers were required to select the best match to complete the stem below.

 

With reference to the question, the response has evidence of:

(A) analysis and interpretation  of visual language and expression.

(B) analysis of visual language and expression.

(C) description of artworks.

 

A marker has incorrectly selected (B) as the best match.  

As a senior marker, you will be required to provide feedback to markers.

In your feedback, identify the option that best matches the evidence in the response. Explain to the marker why it is the best match. (100 words)

Thank you

Thank you for completing the Online Senior Marker Task.

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