AXA Complaints Handling Process Test

Purpose - The purpose of this test is to help you test your knowledge about the AXA Complaints Handling Process. You need to know about the process because the FCA has changed the rules about complaints handling, and we have changed our process to stay compliant with the rules. This test is about the new process and about what constitutes a complaint as defined by the FCA. Every customer-facing member of staff must take and pass the test because we need to show that we are compliant with the new rules and that we have made efforts to ensure that our staff know the new rules.

What you need to do - Please attempt all the questions in the test: you’ll be given your score at the end. If you pass, well done! If it’s not so easy first time, please don’t worry; we have some revision modules and other resources to help you remember what you need to know. You can find more information about the new Complaints Handling Process on ONE.

Test structure - The test is a series of multiple choice questions. There are no essay questions. We have chosen some of our questions from real-life examples to make it more relevant to your everyday work.

Good luck and thank you for taking this test. We appreciate your efforts and that you are helping AXA be compliant with the new rules, and helping our customers, too.

Complaints Handling Process (copy)

Who are the FCA?

  • Financial Conduct Authority.
  • Financial Conduct Association.
  • Financial Complaints Authority.
  • Financial Complaints Association.

What is the key change to complaints handling coming into force on 1 July 2016?

  • All expressions of dissatisfaction that meet the FCA definition of a complaint are reportable to the FCA and must therefore be logged onto Respond.
  • All expressions of dissatisfaction must now be logged on to Respond.
  • All complaints that are resolved on the day of receipt don’t need to be logged onto Respond.
  • All complaints must be escalated to a supervisor.

Which of the following is not a criteria for an expression of dissatisfaction being a complaint?

  • It’s from a 3rd party claimant.
  • It’s a verbal expression of dissatisfaction.
  • It’s from a potential customer.
  • It’s caused a customer material inconvenience.
  • It’s about an AXA product or one of our representative’s services.

Is this an example of a complaint? The customer called us because we set up a new policy but accidentally duplicated her direct debit and she incurred bank charges.

  • Yes; because of our error the customer has suffered financial loss and material inconvenience.
  • No, because the customer wasn’t stressed about it.

Is this an example of a complaint? We've given the customer incorrect information about our policy limits and this has caused them to take a day off work to purchase alternative cover but are already covered on our policy. They sound extremely concerned.

  • Yes; because of our error the customer has suffered financial loss, material distress and material inconvenience.
  • Yes; because of our error the customer has suffered financial loss only.
  • Yes; because of our error the customer has suffered material inconvenience only.
  • Yes; because of our error the customer has suffered financial loss and material distress.

Is this an example of a complaint? We declined cover for a customer with a medical condition. As a result the customer decided not to book a holiday. We realised he was covered after all but it was too late for him to book. He was very upset on the phone.

  • Yes; because of our error the customer has suffered material distress.
  • No, because he hadn’t sought out any other cover and it was his decision not to book his trip.

Is this an example of a complaint? The customer has not been provided with a courtesy vehicle from our approved repairer in a timely manner and needed to hire a vehicle herself.

  • Yes, because the customer has suffered material inconvenience and financial loss.
  • No, because it was it was the weekend and she didn’t need a vehicle to get to work.
  • No, because she wasn’t angry and therefore didn’t suffer material distress.

Is this an example of a complaint? One of our staff has a bad day and is rude to a customer who has called to ask for clarification about her policy. The customer hangs up in confusion before she receives the clarification then calls back in tears.

  • Yes; because of our error the customer has suffered material distress and material inconvenience.
  • No, because there was no financial loss.

If we receive a complaint at 3.15 pm on Friday 15th August, by when do we need to resolve it for the complaint to be “informal”?

  • We have until the end of the third working day following the day of receipt of complaint, so that would make it by 5pm on Wednesday 20th August.
  • We have until the end of the third working day including the day of receipt so that would make it by 5pm on Tuesday 19th August.
  • We have until the end of the third day following the date of receipt so that would make it by 5pm on Monday 18th August.
  • We have until the end of the third day including the date of receipt so that would make it by 5pm on Sunday 17th August.

What’s an SRC?

  • Summary Resolution Communication.
  • Service Review Communication.
  • Satisfaction Result Communication.
  • Summary Response Communication.

If we have resolved a complaint on the second day following the date of receipt, what three things do we need to do, for the complaint to be “informal”?

  • Log the complaint on Respond, gain the complainant’s agreement that their complaint has been resolved and send them an SRC.
  • Log the complaint on Respond, gain the complainant’s agreement that their complaint has been resolved, and send them a Final Response letter.
  • Log the complaint locally with the other dissatisfactions, gain the complainant’s agreement that their complaint has been resolved, and send them an SRC.

When should you send an SRC?

  • When you’ve resolved the complaint within three working days following the date of receipt of complaint and the complainant has agreed that their complaint is resolved.
  • When you’ve resolved the complaint within three working days following the date of receipt of complaint.
  • When you’ve resolved the complaint on the same day you received the complaint.

A customer calls and is really angry because he thinks that our on-hold music is annoying. He asks to speak to your senior. Which set of actions do you perform?

  • Apologise to the customer / Pass the customer to your senior / Decide it doesn’t meet the FCA definition of a complaint / Log it locally as a dissatisfaction.
  • Apologise to the customer / Try and resolve it yourself by calling the technical people / Log it as a complaint on Respond as you believe the customer suffered material distress.
  • Apologise to the customer / Pass the customer to your senior / Log it onto Respond.

What’s the process if a complaint remains unresolved after 5pm on the third working day following receipt of complaint?

  • We will send an acknowledgement letter to the complainant, investigate further and then send a Final Response letter within eight weeks from the date of receipt of the complaint.
  • We will investigate further and then send a Final Response letter within six weeks from the date of receipt of the complaint.
  • We will send an acknowledgement letter, investigate further and send an SRC within eight weeks from the date of receipt of the complaint.

Why are the SRC and the Final Response letter so important?

  • They both let the complainant know that we have given them our resolution, and that they have the right to escalate their complaint to the Financial Ombudsman Service and shows them how to do this.
  • They both indicate to the complainant that we are at fault.