Remember Names and Faces Training

Linking Names to Faces

Linking Names to Faces

How to Remember Names and Link them to Faces? It’s a common problem!!

  • Commonly, people complain of constantly forgetting people's names. Images and faces are easy to recall since our brains have an entire section devoted to recognizing faces, either friend or foe, but unfortunately there is no link between faces and names. Complicating this problem is that often we find ourselves in the position where we see many clients throughout the day and some of them may be upset if we don't remember their name! 
  • As anyone in customer service can attest to, there are clients who would take their business elsewhere. The thinking behind this being,"If they cant remember who I am, how much do they care about my business?"
  • So what's the trick?  “mnemonics” 

Linking Names to Faces

"There is no sound so sweet as the sound of one's own name."

- William Shakespeare

  • Try to focus on the results of remembering their name instead of the anxiety involved in being right or not. 
  • Remembering names makes a connection with the person on a very personal level.
  • Often there is only one chance to make a good first impression! Make it count!
  • Always remember what it feels like when people forget your name. No one likes to be forgotten.

Linking Names to Faces

First Step

  • Pay attention
    • ‚ÄčConcentrate on their face and their name. Don't worry about the handshake or what you're going to say next. Just name and face.

Linking Names to Faces

Second Step

  • Meet and repeat.
    • Use their name while you talk to them. This is will help to cement it into the mind. 
    • Don't over do it! Here are some examples.
      • "Hi, Faxson, nice to meet you!"
      • "How long have you been in the medical field, Seleen?"
    • When saying goodbye, be sure to say their name one last time, and be sure to look at their face while you do.

Linking Names to Faces

Third Step

  • Spell it out.
    • Many people are visual, and spelling out their name can help to visualize a name and help to relate it to a face. 
    • If they have a business card, glance at their name while talking to them. This will help to reference their face with other visual clues to help to remember their name.
    • The first chance you get, put them into your contacts. Include some personal information so help clue you into who the person is.
      • "Jesus - Super nice!, Dad is in charge, LOVES sandals."

Linking Names to Faces

Fourth Step

  • Associate.
    • Memory experts, especially the magicians who make their living with memory, use a very easy technique. Associate their name in an alliterative way. This is best explained through some examples.
      • Phil from Maine - Picture Phil filling up a pool in frozen Maine. It's a funny picture, and easy to remember. Most importantly, the action the person is doing is filling a pool, you'll always know his name is Phil.
      • Faxson - kinda nerdy IT guy. Picture Faxson doing fractions on his computer. Since his name sounds like what he is doing (Fraction) it will be easier to see this picture when you see Faxson's face. Also since Faxson's boyhood nickname was fraction he'll find it hilarious, even if you get it wrong.
      • Seleen - always smiling, So picture her smiling. Smiling Seleen. Even tricks as simple as repeating sounds  can help remind you of names.

Linking Names to Faces

Fifth Step

  • Make Connections.
    • Connect people you meet with people you already know. (Famous, Family, or Friends)
      • Kelly, like my sister.
      • Michael who looks kinda like Michael Jordan if you shave his head.
      • Julie who kinda looks like Downtown Julie Brown.
    • It takes a bit longer to make the original association and come up with a quick way to remember, but once it's made, it's locked in for easy recall later.

Linking Names to Faces

Sixth Step

  • Choose to Care.
    • Often when we meet someone there is a lot going on, or maybe you're meeting a number of people at once. Either way we kind of skip over their names and faces. Maybe we don't look at them, or we just figure we will learn their name later. 
    • Make the conscious decision to remember their name. Just the act of determining to remember their name will force you to look at them and find a way to remember them. 
    • Besides remembering their name, people will pick up on the fact that you care about who they are and will feel appreciated and welcomed.

Linking Names to Faces

Making Connections

  • There are two main methods to make connections between names and faces. 
    • The Observation System
    • The Association System'
  • Faces are processed differently than general information, including names. Throughout history it has been very important for humans to be able to recognize friend from foe quickly. In response to this the brain has formed a highly specialized ability to recognize faces. This section of the brain is closely related to the visual system.
  • The key is to translate the name into a visual format that can be stored in the same way as faces get stored.

Linking Names to Faces

The Observational System

  • This system relies on the theory that we visualize names in some way. A name is merely a label with no real meaning to the word. How do you define "Michael"?
  • So the first trick is to break down names into parts that do have meaning.
    • Rosenburg - Rose + Hen + (ice)Burg
    • Johnson - John + Son
    • Greensmith - Green + (black)Smith
  • Some names will be easier than others, but it's another tool for your tool-belt!

Linking Names to Faces

The Observational System

  • Some names are harder than others to alliterate and visualize, but with practice every name and face will have something that comes to mind.
  • This process works on two fronts.
    • Associates a mental image with an abstract concept, like a name.
    • Focuses attention on remembering the name and face, and just taking the time to pay attention is half the battle.
  • At the end of the slides, we will look at some examples.

Linking Names to Faces

The Association system

  • Breaking down names into visual pictures is only part of the process. Most important is to associate those images to a person in a meaningful way for recall later.
  • Pick out a characteristic of the person and link it to the images you have created. 
  • Make a little one line story out of it, and the funnier or more odd, the better.

Linking Names to Faces

Examples

  • Say there is a woman whom you have just been introduced to – who happens to have long, red hair – goes by the name of Miss Fields. All that you need to do would be to simply visualize an image of her lying in a large, green field, with her long red hair. See it twisting around the long, green grass. You might try exaggerating her hair length, this way you associate her hair with the field. When you see her again, remember the hair in the field, and of her name “Fields”.
  • Remembering a man you just met is called Mr. Taylor, first pick out his most outstanding feature (say thick eyebrows) and imagine him with super long eyebrows. Now picture him in a funny setting, like getting measured for a suit at a tailor shop, and the tailor confused about his long eyebrows. So when you think of his eyebrows, you see a tailor shop and know his name!

Linking Names to Faces

Examples

  • In order to remember that the name of a tall, skinny man you just met is Mr. Adamson, maybe try visualizing the biblical first man “Adam” with an infant boy. Adam’s son – Adamson!
  • To remember the name of a young lady named Miss Hill who has a wide forehead, visualize a hill in the middle of her forehead, complete with trees and maybe a few sheep!