User guide: The Harmony Room

                    User guide: We Care                           

                                        Assist students to choose the right tools to self-regulate.

Click the link below to watch the video.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Up93khrGpoc

A 30-minute course for workers to facilitate skills that support self–regulation for the students using the Harmony room. Given what EM school invested on equipment and tools for the Harmony room, the workers need to be taught to use the tools and  strategies accurately by firstly learning what they are and its benefits. The anticipated results is for the workers to be able to assist students with developing the ability to choose the right tools and strategies independently to talk about their feelings, solve problems collaboratively and self-regulate their emotions.                                      

©2015 Elitri  All Rights Reserved        

 

Summarize the theoretical frameworks

Self-regulation method

Self-regulation is the process of how children respond to their environment (Bronson, 2000). It is ability to monitor and manage emotions, thoughts, and behaviors (McClelland, Ponitz, Messersmith, & Tominey, 2010). It's what helps children focus their attention on learning when they might be distracted by others, upset by a problem, or excited about an upcoming event (Community for children, 2015). It refers to both the conscious and unconscious processes that allow us to regulate our thoughts, feelings and actions in service of a goal (Bailey, 2013)

Some benefits include:

  • To have self-control: For children to be their own compass to guide them through their emotions. 
  • Being connected to themselves to govern their behaviours: Coaching children to be attuned to their distress and help them be able to put a pause between feeling and action. Knowing distress is temporary and will pass.
  • Seeing a problem as an opportunity to grow: How emotions are the bridge between problem and solution.

Social emotional learning is related to self-regulation

 Social emotional learning (SEL) is the process through which children and adults acquire and apply the knowledge, attitudes, and skills necessary to understand and manage emotions; set and achieve positive goals; feel and show empathy for others; establish and maintain positive relationships; and make responsible decisions (CASEL, 2015). Children who can self-regulate have skills that help them manage their emotions, behaviours and interact successfully with others—all elements of social-emotional competence (CASEL, 2015).

There is a relationship between self-regulation and emotions (Bailey, 2011). According to Perry (2001) healthy self-regulation is related to the competency  to tolerate the sensations of distress that accompany an unmet need. Self-regulation is the integrative process of that comes about by allowing our unconsciousness emotions to become a conscious feeling. 

The Ruler method

Develops emotional intelligence skills in children and the adults who are involved in their education at school, at home and in their communities.

Emotions matter: Emotions drive learning, decision-making, creativity, relationships, and health.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mkZd2VKpFrU

RULER stands for: 

Mood MeterThe Mood Meter helps students and educators become more aware of how their emotions change throughout the day and how their emotions affect their actions. 

** All feelings are important because feelings matter. ** 

The list of some emotions associated to each quadrant:

Red(High energy-Low pleasantness): Angry, frustrated, concerned, worried, scared, agitated, intimidated, aggravated, focussed

Blue(Low energy- Low energy): Discouraged, sad, guilty, bored, tired, sick, mopey 

Green(Low energy- High pleasantness): Calm, zen, relaxed, , mindful, peaceful, mellow, tranquil, content, comfortable

Yellow (High energy- High pleasantness): Excited, wiggly, silly, fulfilled, empowered, exhilarated, upbeat, delighted, cheerful, happy

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F1sGD1krffM

Meta-Moment

The Meta-Moment encourages both students and adults to pause and think before acting, asking themselves, “How would my ‘best self’ react in this situation? What strategy can I use so that my actions reflect my best self?”

List the benefits of using the ruler method

  • Better school climate
  • Increased emotional intelligence
  • Decreased anxiety and depression
  • Reduced likelihood of bullying
  • Better leadership skills and attention

Mindfulness practice

Describe how it is used for self-regulation

Jon Kabat-Zinn (1976), describes mindfulness as the quality of awareness (paying attention to one’s experience through the senses and the mind); of non-judgment (not labeling things “good” or “bad” but rather observing with a neutral attitude); and of stillness in heart and mind (though the body may be moving). These are all important aspects that build self-relation for children and youth

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rJkj0EEhhr0

List the benefits of using the mindfulness practice

  • Mindfulness is good for the mind: Several studies have found that mindfulness increases positive emotions while reducing negative emotions and stress.
  • Mindfulness changes our brain: Research has found that it increases density of gray matter in brain regions linked to learning, memory, emotion regulation, and empathy.
  • Mindfulness helps us focus: Studies suggest that mindfulness helps us tune out distractions and improves our memory and attention skills.
  • Mindfulness is good for our spirit: Evidence suggests mindfulness reduces anger, hostility, and mood disturbances among children and youth.

Collaborative problem solving

"Kids do well if they can" (Greene, 2013)

If a child cannot do well, then something is getting in their way.  Behind most challenging behaviours is a problem. We need to figure out what are the actual skills they are lacking and work as a team to solve the problem.

What workers can do?

Help kids stay regulated

Facilitate intrinsic motivation

Remember:

KIDS LACK SKILLS NOT WILL

Behaviour modification strategies that do not work:

Operant strategies: Motivates the compliant behavior through incentives, consistent programs of rewards punishment and ignoring.

What is the difference between intrinsic and extrinsic motivation:

Intrinsic: Sense of mastery, autonomy and purpose

Extrinsive: reinforcing the behaviour.

“The more you motivate someone to do something the more you teach them they are not trying hard enough.”

“The more extrinsic is applied the less intrinsive motivation  occurs”

Have you heard these terms before?

Dead-End Explanations

“He is crazy”
“He has ADHD” “She’s adopted”
“He just wants attention”
“She just wants her own way” “He just wants control”
“He’s manipulative”
“She has a mental illness”
“He has a bad attitude”
“She’s making bad choices”
“He won’t cooperate” “He is lazy”

Rather than focusing on a label focus on the needs and the thinking skills the child may be lacking

Different types of thinking skills:

Executive skills:

- Define problems

- Consider range of solutions

- Anticipate likely outcome

Language processing skills:

-Label, categorize and express emotions

-Identify and articulate one’s needs

-Solve problems through give and take

Emotion regulation skills:

-Stay calm in the midst of frustration to think clearly

-Regulate emotions throughout the day (outside the context of frustration)

Cognitive flexibility skills:

-Skills that allow you to see the grays in situations, see the big picture. Go with the flow

- Skills that allow you to interpret information accurately and see the “big picture”

  (Avoid overgeneralizating, personalizing, catastrophizing etc.)

Social thinking skills:

Skills that allow you to interact successfully with others

“You can’t solve a behaviour. You can solve a problem leading to a behaviour.”

Communicating with your child is the first step.

There are different ways to communicate affectively.

Plan A: Impose adult will:

 “Do it right now because I said so”

Goals being pursued: The expectations

Goals not being pursued: Reducing challenging behavior solving problems so they don’t keep coming up. Building skills, confidence, creating or restoring a helping relationship

 

*******Plan B: Solve the problem collaboratively *********

  1. Empathy: Clarify child concern

-Gather information to understand the child’s specific concern or perspective about the problem or issue.

“I noticed that” “It seems like” “It looks as if” ……..”What’s up?”

-Make sure to provide reassurance:

“I’m not saying no” “I’m not saying you have to” I’m just trying to understand”

  1. Share adult concern

To make sure the adult’s concern/ perspective is put on the table.

“And the thing is” “And my concern is” “And what’s important to me is”

Clarify your concerns/ perspectives: Health, safety, learning, and impact of behaviours on others.

**If the child is not ready go back to empathy step. **

  1. Collaborate: Brainstorm, assess and choose solution

To brainstorm solutions together so as to address both concerns, assess them and choose one to try.

“I bet we can think of something that will work” “Do you have any ideas” “Lets think it through together”

Plan C: Drop it (for now, at least)

Activity

Read and respond to the questions above. Keep notes for your own self learning. 

 

Summary

Self regulation: Self-regulation is the process of how children respond to their environment (Bronson, 2000). It's what helps children focus their attention on learning when they might be distracted by others, upset by a problem, or excited about an upcoming event (Community for children, 2015).

There is a relationship between self-regulation and emotions (Bailey, 2011). According to Perry (2001) healthy self-regulation is related to the compact to tolerate the sensations of distress that accompany an unmet need. Self-regulation is the integrative process of that comes about by allowing our unconsciousness emotions to become a conscious feeling. 

Ruler method: Develops emotional intelligence skills in children and the adults who are involved in their education at school, at home and in their communities.

The Meta-Moment encourages both students and adults to pause and think before acting, asking themselves, “How would my ‘best self’ react in this situation? What strategy can I use so that my actions reflect my best self?”

The Mood Meter helps students and educators become more aware of how their emotions change throughout the day and how their emotions affect their actions.

Mindfulness: Jon Kabat-Zinn (1976), describes mindfulness as the quality of awareness (paying attention to one’s experience through the senses and the mind); of non-judgment (not labeling things “good” or “bad” but rather observing with a neutral attitude); and of stillness in heart and mind (though the body may be moving). These are all important aspects that build self-relations for children and youth.

Collaborative problem solving: Back-and-forth communication designed to reach agreement when you and the other side have some interests that are shared and others that are opposed.

Assessment

  • healthy self-regulation is related to the met needs within the unconsciousness.
  • Self-regulation is the process of that comes about by allowing all our emotions to become unconscious feelings.
  • Self-regulation is the integrative process of that comes about by allowing our unconsciousness emotions to become a conscious feeling.
  • Self-regulation is a way that children respond to themselves unconsciously.
Describe Self regulation

Assessment

  • The ruler method helps student s make better physical choices
  • The ruler method helps students face their fears
  • The ruler method increases student's emotional intelligence
  • The ruler method decrease the student's emotional intelligence
Describe why the ruler method is  used within the Harmony room.

Assessment

  • Mindfulness based practice is paying attention to one’s experience through the senses and the mind
  • Mindfulness practice is stillness in heart and mind like a statue
  • Mindfulness based practice is being able to focus on numerous things at the same time while your mind is at a stillness.
  • Mindfulness based practice is paying attention to the stillness of others.
Describe why mindfulness based practice is used within the Harmony room.

Describe the different tools

Pillars

4 Pillars of tools and strategies

The four pillars are grouped tools and strategies categorized by emotionally influenced forms of pro-active self-regulation.  The pillars are labeled as: challenge, create, activate, and calm (see image below). 

Similar to the ruler method, the pillars are for students to have a visual guide to situate their state of mind and respond to their feelings in a proactive way. With the mood meter, there are suggested types of learning activities that reflect each quadrant.  

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qj6AIczvDhg

Applying the Pillars

When using the pillars, the goal is to regulate emotions effectively in a way that they feel suits them best.  The selected activities and tools in the quadrant are not the expected consequence of the identified feelings. For example, if a student is in the red quadrant of the mood meter (low energy and low pleasantness), it does not mean he or she needs to express themselves or relieve the emotion with the "challenging" tools and strategies such as creating a puzzle. The student can select the pillar(s) of preference. The pillars provide them with a visual to guide and situate their preferences to increase self-awareness in regards to self-regulation. Thus, when ready, they can self-regulate their own emotions throughout their daily lives independently. The end result is not for them to only be in the green (feeling: calm, relaxed, zen, etc), rather to assist them to reach their desired feelings, to help them be in a place ready to learn. 

These strategies can be used universally, meaning, it could be used to reward the student when they have worked hard or to simply have them discover their interest in self-regulation.  It should not be used as a consequence to a crisis. In contrast, students should form their own mental tools box of strategies prior to crisis.

List of Tools and Strategies:

The following are a list of tools and strategies that are used within the harmony room. This list is structured as the four pillars, Within these four pillars are areas of focus:  technological (machine based software and hardware), tangible (hands on equipment that focuses on the students) and talkable (communication, relationship building). For a better visual understanding please see the image of how it will be displayed in the room.  

 

 

CHALLENGE

Technological:  brain teasers, problem solving activities, research more about a difficult topic on the computer to solve a problem. Puzzle or strategy building apps

Tangible: Connectors (toy), puzzles, cards, brain teaser games, rubbix cube, the sensory wall. 

Talkable: Have a discussion or a debate, brainstorm ideas to solve the problem, take a meta-moment, take action by talking to someone in charge to help make a difference. 

ACTIVATE

Technical:  Listen and or sign to upbeat music and dance. Follow a movement video. 

Tangible: Mini hockey, ball catch, exercise drills in class or around the school, take a walk, study hard, stretch, eat or drink

Talkable: Group work, group discussions, 

CALM

Technical:  Listen to calming music, 

Tangible: Stress balls, stress release toys, slinky, books, little figurine toys,a alligator pillow, resting in the tent while looking at the bubble wall.

Talkable: Breathing techniques, yoga meditation, mindfulness, crisis intervention strategies, mindfulness practice, muscle-relaxation exercises, find support. 

CREATE

Technical: Create digital art images, videos or music

Tangible: Pencil and markers, paper, paint, clay, moon sand, legos, blocks, moon sand. 

Talkable: Creating a story, poem, music, song, painting drawing. Having a discussion about it 

Watch the video below that summarizes the four pillars:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gMM0vLFHvvE

Materials

Po-motion

Po-motional is an interactive digital media tool that uses projection to bring real objects to life with interactive effects and animations. The actions within the games focus on relaxation, Dance, Hockey, Soccer, Pong, Herd Things, Race, Multiple-Choice Tile Scatter (effect), Squash Things (effect), and Pond (effect). These games will be used for experiential strategies for students to learn how they best cope with their emotions. The selected games will be categorized into the four pillars so student can learn and understand the way in which they self regulate best (see list of tools and strategies).

Oculus Rift (headset)

Oculus Rift headset is a virtual reality tool created by Samsung. EM school will be purchasing one and will be part of a research study on empathy and virtual reality. With the use of this headset, students will have the opportunity to be part of a mindful virtual experience to help the relax during a time of tension. 

Sensory wall

As Tania Piperni stated in an article sent called "Sensory integration and autism"

"Sensory integration problems can manifest themselves as inappropriate behaviours as the child attempts to normalize sensory information. These behaviours are in fact involuntary strategies to cope with stimulation issues; therefore it is unwise to stop these behaviours without learning their true function, then we can try to introduce more acceptable behaviours serving the same function (Piperni, 2015)."

To promote positive sensory integration, EM school will create a sensory wall with real everyday tools materials to help children with special needs. The goal is, not only to use these materials to normalize sensory information, but to also to transfer it to daily living skills.

In fact all children seem to benefit in playing with the wall. It allows them to have an opportunity to practice daily skills in a therapeutic environment.

Bubble wall

The bubble wall is a water framed wall measuring approximently 4x4 that has a multi-coloured lighting component associated to it.  It is a tool to promote visual stimulation used within the harmony room to help increase relaxation and relieve stress. Students will have the option to have the bubble wall lamp on during their time in the room. 

Activity

 

 Think about a student that you work closely with and answer the following questions:

 

Summary

The four pillars:

Goal: To assist students to reach their desired feelings. Thus, when ready, they can self-regulate their own emotions throughout their daily lives independently.

Challenge: 

Technological: (Po-motion games) Bubble popping game, greedy gator.  Puzzle apps, 

Tangible: Connectors (toy), puzzles, cards, brain teaser games, rubbix cube. 

Verbal: Have a discussion or a debate, brainstorm ideas to solve the problem

Activate: Technical: (Po-motion games) Soccer, car follow, dance floor, hockey,

Tangible: Mini hockey, ball catch, exercise drills in class or around the school, take a walk

Verbal: Group work, group discussions, 

Calm:

 Technical: (Po-motion games) Rocky pond, snowy holiday, day-night, water rubble. (youtube) Calming music

Tangible: Stress balls, stress release toys, slinky, books, little figurine toys, resting in the tent while looking at the bubble wall.

Verbal: Breathing techniques, yoga meditation, mindfulness, crisis intervention strategies

Create: 

Technical: (Po-motion games) rainbow cloud, pianio, 

Tangible: Pencil and markers, paper, paint, clay, moon sand, legos, blocks, alligator pillow, 

Verbal: Creating a story, poem, music, song, painting drawing. having a discussion about it or anything else in a relaxing environment. 

Assessment

  • Challenge (intrinsically stimulating), activate (physically active), create (artistic), calm (relaxing)
  • Create (intrinsically stimulating), activate (physically active), Challenge (artistic), calm (relaxing)
  • Create (intrinsically stimulating), calm (physically active), Challenge (artistic), activate (relaxing)
  • Create (relaxing), calm (physically active), Challenge (artistic), activate (intrinsically stimulating)
Describe describe the four pillars:

Assessment

  • sensory wall, po-motion software, exercise ball, bubble wall
  • sensory wall, bubble wall, virtual reality headset, exercise ball
  • po-motion, bubble wall, sensory wall, puzzles, stress balls
  • po-motion, bubble wall, sensory wall, puzzles, stress balls, exercise balls
Name some tools or strategies used in each pillar.

Summarize the intervention procedures

Scenarios

Introduction

Now it is time to put frameworks and strategies into practice. 

The frameworks used within the Harmony Room (unit 1) and the tools and strategies (unit 2) are put together to  help the student(s) self-regulate their emotions. 

**Remember**

The main goal- 

-For the students to self-regulate their emotions independently within their daily lives.

-To transfer what they learnt and apply it in any environment they are in. 

The harmony room: 

- Is an environment for the students to practice their new acquired skills and increase their social emotional competencies. 

- It must be used as a place to practice self-regulating skills before the student is actually in crisis. 

Scenarios: 

The scenarios bellow describe a possible child that you may work with. Please think about these scenarios while learning the materials in this unit. 

Please click the i icon to read the text.

Steps:

The 5 steps below should be applied when working with students.

Scenarios

Steps

Prerequisite:  

Prior to an incident all students that a special education technician or child care worker is assigned to must complete an IEBP (individual education behaviour plan) to properly assess the student and understand them holistically (see additional information in both the e-learning and the learners manual).

IEBP (individual education behaviour plan): An individualized program that describes the student’s areas of concerns and strengths in regards to their behaviour. The focus is on educational, social and personal characteristics. It brakes down the objectives and a goal for the student to focus on. It also identifies the special support needed for the students to reach their goal.  

Students must understand the following terms  (review notes in e-course unit 2 and or learners maual):

  •  Mood meter
  • Meta moments
  • Strategy wall

Step 1: Mood Meter

Prerequisite: Teach the students the four areas in the mood meter:

-With the student list different emotions in each quadrant (look at the feelings wall for assistance in the harmony room.)

 

Have students describe what happens to the body, face, voice when they experience these emotions.

Throughout the school(s) day try identifying of the student experiencing favoured  feelings.

You can create a personalized mood meter using illustrations

 (Backatt, M.A, Caruso, D.R, Stern. R.S. (2013) Emotionally intelligent schools: Ruler method.) 

Step 1:

-Identify where the child is situated on the mood meter 

you could log use the app: 

https://itunes.apple.com/ca/app/mood-meter-building-your-emotional/id825930113?mt=8

-Ask the student to identify himself/herself on the mood meter. They could so so by pointing on the wall poster or using the mood check-in sheet (see page 274 Backatt, M.A, Caruso, D.R, Stern. R.S. (2013). 

- Ask the student to describe what happens to his/her the body, face, voice when they experience these specific emotion(s).

- Identify where the child is expected to be with regards to the mood meter.

- Describe the importance of feeling and understanding all emotions on the mood meter.

-When appropriate, ask students to fill in the mood meter check-in (see additional information section).

Step 2:  Meta-Moment

- Have the student(s) go through the meta-moment steps.

7501. Something happens: Realize a trigger has set off an emotional response.

2. Senses: Recognize the shifts in the thoughts body, and behaviour.

3. Stop: Catch and focus on breathing to avoid being swept up by emotions

4. See your best self: Activate an image of "best self" to change the mindset

5. Strategize: Choose an effective emotion regulation strategy.

**** The harmony room is used for students to practice learning how they like to best self-regulate. This is not used as an escape for children to play and not do their work. 

 6. Succeed: Respond effectively

Step 3:  Strategies

-Determine what strategy(ies) the student chooses. Ask them to identify what category the strategy or tool belongs (pillars) to  and describe its benefits.

At times, the facilitator can suggest a tool that they may see fit for the student. If doing so, before hand, explain the rationale (why and benefits) to the student .

-Create a transference by linking different strategies within a category to tools in their environment. 

Step 4: Collaborative problem solving Approach

***This should only be attempted after the children has calmed down and is ready to discuss the problem at hand. 

Communicate with the child. Help the child find solutions to the problem. 

1. EMPATHY: CLARIFY CHILD CONCERN

“I’ve noticed that ....” (neutral, don’t blame or assume, stick to the facts!)

2. SHARE ADULT CONCERN

“The thing is ...” or “I’m worried that ...”

What are your concerns? Health, safety, learning, impact on others?

3. COLLABORATE: BRAINSTORM, ASSESS & CHOOSE SOLUTION

Frame the problem: “I wonder if there’s a way that....” (repeat their concerns and your concerns)
Give kid first crack at it (“Do you have any ideas?)but provide help if needed If they have trouble coming up with ideas, remember: MAD

o Meet halfway ?
o Ask for help ?
o Do it a different way ?

Any idea is a good idea! “Let’s think it through together”
Litmus test: Does it work for you? Does it work for me? Doable? Bring up any other concerns?
If neither of you has any ideas, come back to it later.
If you do come up with a solution, try it out and then come back and talk about how it worked (When can we talk again to see how it worked?)

Step 5: documentation

Have the student (with assistance), complete a reflection sheet (see additional resources or learners manual booklet). Discuss the process by going through each heading.

Reflection sheet: help students form an understanding to a situation with regards to how the reacted to it along with the behaviours they expressed. 

On your own time, complete an incident report (see additional information or learners manual booklet) if nessesary.

 

Activity

Select one of the three scenarios and go through the 4 steps.

1. Mood meter

2. meta-moment

3. Strategy 

4. Documentation

Send your responses in an email to the instructor ([email protected]). 

Summary

The 5 steps in the intervention procedure when using the harmony room

step 1: Help the student identify where they are situated on the mood meter.

Step 2: Help the student go through the steps of a meta-moment

Step 3: Help students select the best strategy for their specific situation. 

Step 4: Do the paper work involved (reflection sheet, incident report)

 

Assessment

  • step 1: Help the student identify where they are situated on the mood meter. Step 2: Help the student go through the steps of a meta-moment Step 3: Help students select the best strategy for their specific situation. Step 4: Do the paper work involved (reflection sheet, incident report)
  • step 1: Help the student identify where they are situated on the mood meter. Step 2: Help the student go a mega- mindfulness Step 3: Help students select the best strategy for their specific situation. Step 4: Do the paper work involved (reflection sheet, incident report)

Describe the four basic steps in intervention procedures of the Harmony room?

Assessment

  • Having students complete a reflection sheet helps them learn their process in self-regulation.
  • Having students complete a reflection sheet helps them learn more about the harmony room.
Explain why it is important for students to complete the reflection sheet at the end of the intervention?

Additional Information

Glossary

Unit 1:

Self-regulation: The process of how children respond to their environment (Bronson, 2000). It's what helps children focus their attention on learning when they might be distracted by others, upset by a problem, or excited about an upcoming event (Community for children, 2015).

Social emotional learning: The process through which children and adults acquire and apply the knowledge, attitudes, and skills necessary to understand and manage emotions, set and achieve positive goals, feel and show empathy for others, establish and maintain positive relationships, and make responsible decisions (CASEL, 2015).

Mindfulness: The quality of awareness (paying attention to one’s experience through the senses and the mind); of non-judgment (not labeling things “good” or “bad” but rather observing with a neutral attitude); and of stillness in heart and mind (though the body may be moving).

Ruler method: Is the process of the following steps. Recognizes emotions self and others. Understanding the causes and consequences of emotions. Labeling emotions appropriately. Expressing emotions appropriately and regulating emotions effectively. 

Meta moment: Encourages both students and adults to pause and think before acting, asking themselves, “How would my ‘best self’ react in this situation? What strategy can I use so that my actions reflect my best self?”

Mood-meter: Helps students and educators become more aware of how their emotions change throughout the day and how their emotions affect their actions. 

Feelings: It is the expression of the state of emotion

Emotions: A natural instinctive state of mind deriving from one's circumstances, mood, or relationships with others.

Unit 2:

Four pillars: For students to have a visual guide to situate their state of mind and respond to their feelings in a proactive way. They are labelled as: challenge, create, activate, and calm.  The goal is to regulate emotions effectively in a way that they feel suits them best. The four pillars provides them with tools and strategies used within that emotional quadrant to practice positive skills.

Oculus rift headset: A virtual reality tool created by Samsung. 

Sensory wall:  Items placed on a board that are real everyday tools materials to help children with special needs. The goal is no only use these materials to normalize sensory information, but to also transfer it to daily living skills.

Po-motion:  An interactive digital media tool that uses projection to bring real objects to life with interactive effects and animations.

Bubble wall:  A water framed wall measuring approximently 4x4 that has a multi-coloured lighting component associated to it.

Unit 3:

IEBP (individual education behaviour plan): An individualized program that describe the student’s areas of concerns and strengths with regards to their behaviours; with the focus of educational, social and personal characteristics. It brakes down the objectives and a goal for  students to focus on. It also identifies the special support needed for the students to reach their goals.  

Rationale: A set of reasons or a logical basis for a course of action or a particular belief.

Holistic: Characterized by comprehension of the parts of something as intimately interconnected and explicable only by reference to the whole.

Transference: The phenomenon whereby we unconsciously transfer feelings and attitudes from a person or situation in the past on to a person or situation in the present

Reflection sheet: help students form an understanding to a situation with regards to how the reacted to it along with the behaviours they expressed. 

Using Po-motion software

Po-motion

Prior to opening software: In reflection to the strategies determine what game would be best suited for the students (see list of games in strategy list).

Open the laptop.

Open Kinect.

Open internet explorer.

Type in: www.po-motion.com 

Click sign it icon. 

Username: (to be determined)

Password: (to be determined)

 

 

Select a game

***When finished- Remember to sign out and close laptop. 

How to work the bubble wall.

                                                                                              Bubble wall

Turn on or off using the switch.

Make sure to turn off after use.

Never leave bubble wall on over night. 

 

Reflection sheet and IEBP

 


Other resources

http://www.casel.org

http://ei.yale.edu/ruler/

http://thehawnfoundation.org/mindup/

http://consciousdiscipline.com/resources/self_regulation.asp​

http://www.livesinthebalance.org

https://itunes.apple.com/ca/app/mood-meter-building-your-emotional/id825930113?mt=8

Mindfulness and relaxation practice examples

Mindfulness practice exercise:

Duration: 5 minutes

Video here on applying mindfulness as a strategy.

1. “Please get into your ‘mindful bodies’—still and quiet, sitting upright, eyes closed.”

2. “Now place all your attention on the sound you are about to hear. Listen until the sound is completely gone.”

3. Ring a “mindfulness bell,” or have a student ring the bell. Use a bell with a sustained sound or a rainstick to encourage mindful listening.

4. “Please raise your hand when you can no longer hear the sound.”

5. When most or all have raised their hands, you can say, “Now slowly, mindfully, move your hand to your stomach or chest, and just feel your breathing.”

6. You can help students stay focused during the breathing with reminders like, “Just breathing in … just breathing out …”

7. Ring the bell to end.

See more mindfulness exercises:

 

Relaxation exercise: 

Duration: 5 to 10 minutes

-Put on music listed in calm category (optional)

- put on bubble wall (optional)

- have students sit up or lie down.

- follow steps or create your own. 

1) breathing exercise.

2) Muscle relaxation.

3) Visualization

Selected music by pillars

Example soundtracks 

Challenge: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uDki0LmKhkQ

Activate: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dQFxVkJwVdo

Create: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gb-fQ_9UUMo

Calm: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_R4-eL3IdhE

additional:

focusing music: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pmoGdaOeUkQ

Follow-up face-to-face meeting

You are expected to meet with the instructor on a requested date. The goal is to review the activity questions asked in each unit as a follow up on the e-learning course and to review the tools and strategies that are being used in the Harmony room. This is being done using an experiential, hands on approach.

References

References:

Backatt, M.A, Caruso, D.R, Stern. R.S. (2013) Emotionally intelligent schools: Ruler method. www.ruler.yale.edu

Bronson, M.B. 2000. Self-Regulation in Early Childhood: Nature and Nur- ture. New York: Guilford.

CASEL (2013). CASEL — Collaborative for Academic, Social, and Emotional Learning: What is Social Emotional Learning. retrieved from: http://www.casel.org .

Community for Children. (2015). Retrieved from:  http://www.cfchildren.org/second-step/social-emotional-learning/early-learning-self-regulation-skills

McClelland, M. M., Acock, A. C., & Morrison, F. J. (2006). The impact of kindergarten learning-related social skills on academic achievement at the end of elementary school. Early Childhood Research Quarterly, 21, 471–490.

Wong, J.M.(2011). Meditation is good for the body. Retrieved from:  http://greatergood.berkeley.edu/article/research_digest/how_meditation_is_good_for_mind_and_body#how_mindfulness_helps_our_brains_focus

Image references:

Clipart (2011). Cipy frame. Retrieved from:

http://www.cliparthut.com/tool-box-clip-art-clipart-6UiO6k.html

Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rJkj0EEhhr0

Ocal (2007) Man sitting in a chair. Retrieved from: http://www.clker.com/clipart-2455.html

Chuck, E. (2011) Cheese will be testing the virtual reality headset Oculus Rift as part of the family restaurant chain’s birthday packages. (Photo : Creative Commons)

Van, E. 3000 (2008) Children's procession, beguinage of Lier, Flanders, Belgium

Nithi(2014)anandportraidofindianboy.Retrievedfrom: https://www.flickr.com/photos/nithiclicks/15920980069/in/photolist-qfTbGn-jAM3eh-9PjLoQ-gMGYn-6nu7gR-PDWpT-oPK86y-3mQJKg-53AEmY-ocbvEg-mCKsL-4iLMga-o2AQ7k-bn6Uc1-8VWWKz-p9ptRc-4DXVYT-brBawW-d6F1xC-585G72-6RFFu-6Z3qo8-pwRZpE-bCRemA-nUEzLR-tpkuM-nbrHvW-xF8sbK-49F2xw-az8LS-Hsgcd-8uYyJX-d3yiQE-qS33jQ-rN2xxo-bcqGzg-2DPJo-bBhLGk-7Bsju4-qpzJmX-2bojCJ-yyGnuh-8wcKZq-9q3aQD-dLaJv4-anyXUs-4kRSFb-vF4LR-gr2XJ8-5x6FiC

Bliwas,D.B.(2008)Rashawn.Retrievedfrom: https://www.flickr.com/photos/oneworldgallery/3119659084/in/photolist-5KF4XA-rmRzdM-xF8sbK-qjNfKA-9bQesr-dXCu7-dvRtG3-oNidbr-oNiqbu-oNiqgu-j6RBNX-p5NaLi-oNiq9W-b92GY6-4aBoNx-h4dd7Q-z8bh4Q-e3Uu1K-bDCoC4-5LhQtX-qMCYo3-qtNm2U-7UHqow-92Cjyo-uLQCVW-9nXyUo-7GQogm-rt1ZHm-bCZPZ2-DVRVJ-e5rm9G-7CeDbR-wG3HK3-Ak71zc-qisVh3-zfigkr-yTDWGp-pJPpcq-aLh7uH-oUaBYs-yyz8M2-fxXghn-voFdnm-9XxR3w-r9s7jP-oLDkLj-5jfuw1-645j1A-4m2vez-5TLkKT

Bubble wall. (2013). Retrieved from: http://waterfountainscanada.ca/530-indoor-bubble-wall-residential-floating.php

Evaluation (Kirkpatrick Level 1)

Survey

Please complete the survey:

https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/R99JVMB

Thank you!