Travel Safety Quiz 2017

Travel Safety Quiz

Security-Wise Packing

Q1. WHICH OF THE FOLLOWING CAN BE VERY USEFUL FOR YOUR SECURITY WHEN PACKING?

  1. A doorstopper/wedge
  2. A compass
  3. A corkscrew
  4. An extra pillow

Answer: A doorstopper is the lock you never knew you had. Hotel room break-ins can happen to the most seasoned business traveller, even in low risk countries. Used inside of a hotel door, a doorstopper will render the door much more secure. It’s light and takes up so little space; it is great packing addition.

-International SOS

Safe Hotel Rooms

Q2. FROM A SAFETY PERSPECTIVE, WHICH ROOM OF A HOTEL SHOULD YOU PICK?

  1. Ground floor
  2. Between the 2nd and 6th floors, on the opposite side to the lobby
  3. Any room on the business/executive floor
  4. On the top floor

Answer: Choosing a room at the rear of the hotel, between the 2nd and 6th floors is your best bet. A floor that is too high can be a problem in a fire. Rooms on the 1st or ground floor are more apt to be broken into. The back of the hotel is normally safer in the event of an attack, which normally targets the lobby.

-International SOS

Potable Water

Q3. WHICH TYPE OF WATER IS SAFEST TO DRINK?

  1. Tap water
  2. From a mountain stream
  3. Sparkling water
  4. Bottled water

Answer: Sparkling water is the safest bet as it is difficult to fake. In many countries bottled water is a lucrative trade; locals may try to counterfeit and bottle untreated tap water. If you buy bottled water, look for water from well-known makers in sealed containers. Alternatively, tap water can be consumed provided it is boiled for a full minute.

-International SOS

Road Safety

Q4. WHICH OF THE FOLLOWING ROAD USERS ARE THE MOST AT RISK OF HAVING AN ACCIDENT ABROAD?

  1. Pedestrians
  2. Motorcyclists/scooter riders
  3. Bicylists
  4. Vehicle drivers

Answer: All are at risk; however, the majority of accidents abroad involve pedestrians, “People don’t even think about being injured in a traffic collision when they are on foot.” In fact, a lack of familiarity with local road laws and road culture (for example, stop signs and traffic lights are ignored in some countries), combined with poor traffic infrastructure (missing signs, dangerous roads, unsafe vehicles, improper driver training, lack of crosswalks and more) are to blame for the vast majority of road—including pedestrian—accidents.

- Association for Safe International Road Travel

Illness Abroad

Q5. UP TO WHAT % OF TRAVELLERS EXPERIENCE SOME FORM OF ILLNESS WHILE ABROAD?

  1. 25%
  2. 50%
  3. 75%
  4. 100%

Answer: People who travel overseas have up to a 50 per cent chance of suffering a travel-related illness. While most travel-related illness is minor, some very serious infectious diseases are endemic in some parts of the world. All travellers should be prepared for travel and be aware of health issues and measures to protect themselves from sickness.

- Better Health Victoria

Common Illnesses

Q6. WHAT IS THE MOST COMMON ILLNESS EXPERIENCED BY INTERNATIONAL TRAVELLERS?

  1. Diarrhoea.
  2. Flu.
  3. Altitude sickness.
  4. Hepatitis.

Answer: The most common travel-related illnesses are gastrointestinal diseases usually picked up from poorly prepared foods or untreated water. To avoid diarrhoea, stomach pains, nausea and vomiting associated with these illnesses REFER NEXT PAGE:

Traveler Tips to Avoid Getting Sick

Cont.

  • Use boiled or bottled water, or water purifiers or tablets.
  • Avoid ice in drinks.
  • Avoid unpasteurised milk and dairy products.
  • Avoid fruit and vegetables that have been washed in the local water.
  • Eat thick-skinned fruit and vegetables that you can peel yourself, such as bananas, oranges and mandarins.
  • Make sure food is cooked thoroughly and eat it while it’s hot.
  • Avoid shellfish.
  • Take care with personal hygiene.

- Better Health Victoria

Travel Related Issues

Q7. RATE, FROM HIGHEST TO LOWEST, THE TRAVEL RELATED ISSUES INDIVIDUALS ENCOUNTER ON WORK ASSIGNMENTS

  1. Lack of access to Western Medical care
  2. Illness while on assignment
  3. Travel Delays
  4. Opportunistic crime
  5. Civil Unrest
  6. Road accidents

Answer: C,B,A,D,F,E. All answers were in the top ten occurrence of threats to individuals travelling for work*. Travel-related issues (delays and crime), illness and medical care, and accidents (road and work) occur more often than major dangerous political situations, or natural disasters and catastrophes. The most commonly experienced illness- and accident-related threats are also more preventable, and their risks can more easily be managed through awareness and planning.

- International SOS Duty of Care and Travel Risk Management Global Benchmarking Study 2011 *(measured worldwide over 3 years)

Health Risk Rating in Cambodia

Q8. WHAT IS CAMBODIA’S HEALTH RISK RATING?
(According to International SOS’s Health Risk Map 2015)

  1. Low
  2. Medium
  3. High
  4. Large rapidly developing country (mix of high to low)

Answer: High Risk. E.g. countries with limited medical capabilities. Emergency services and dental care may be basic. Access to quality prescription drugs may be limited and, in some cases, counterfeiting and/or improper storage of drugs is an issue. Serious infectious diseases such as typhoid, cholera, dengue fever and malaria may pose a threat

Health Risk Rating in Fiji & Tonga

Q9. WHAT IS FIJI & TONGA’S HEALTH RISK RATING?
(According to International SOS’s Health Risk Map 2015)

  1. Low
  2. Medium
  3. High
  4. Large rapidly developing country (mix of high to low)

Answer: Medium Risk. E.g High or international standard available from selected providers; other providers offer a lower standard of care. Adequate emergency services and dental care usually available. Some risk of food or water-borne diseases. Diseases such as malaria and dengue fever may be present.

Health Risk Rating in Philippines & Indonesia

Q10. WHAT IS INDONESIA & PHILIPPINES’ HEALTH RISK RATING?
(According to International SOS’s Health Risk Map 2015)

  1. Low
  2. Medium
  3. High
  4. Large rapidly developing country (mix of high to low)

Answer: Large rapidly developing country. E.g Selected group of large rapidly developing countries where there is a vast difference between the high quality medical care available in the major cities and the low levels of care generally available throughout the rest of the country. In major cities: The standard of medical care is high or of an international standard from selected providers; other providers offer a lower standard of care. Elsewhere: Medical care, emergency services and dental care may be basic. Access to prescription drugs may be limited and counterfeiting and/or improper storage may be an issue. Serious illness such as dengue, malaria, typhoid and cholera may pose a threat in some regions or throughout the country.

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