The Underground Railroad in Connecticut

Welcome to the Underground Railroad in Connecticut!

In this course, fourth grade students will explore the Underground Railroad and how it was used in Connecticut.

Following a slide show on the Underground Railroad, students will be able to correctly define important vocabulary words.

Important Vocabulary

What was the Underground Railroad?

*Network of secret routes and safe houses

*Used by slaves to escape

*Led to free states and Canada

*Run by “conductors” and other abolitionists.

The following vocabulary words and definitions will also be included on this slide.

Other Important Words to Know are:

Abolish: to do away with something
Abolitionist: people who wanted to end slavery in the United States
Conductor: an individual who escorted or guided freedom seekers between stations or safe houses.

Discrimination: to make a difference in treatment or favor based on something other than individual merit


Fine: a penalty (usually money) imposed on someone as a punishment


Freedom: the power to do what you want to and not be controlled by another


Fugitive: a person running away to avoid being captured


Prohibit: to forbid something
Property: something that is owned by a person such as land or personal belongings


Slave: a person without freedom who is owned by another and is made to work for free


Matching Activity

  • Underground Railroad
    A network of secret routes and safe houses used by slaves to escape
  • Abolish
    to do away with something
  • Abolitionist
    people who wanted to end slavery in the United States
  • Conductor
    an individual who escorted or guided freedom seekers between stations or safe houses.
  • Discrimination
    to make a difference in treatment or favor based on something other than individual merit
  • Fine
    a penalty (usually money) imposed on someone as a punishment

Use your vocabulary words to fill in the blanks.

 the power to do what you want to and not be controlled by another.  A person running away to avoid being captured
 is a .  To forbid something is to .  A  or a  person without freedom who is owned by another and is made to work for free
 was considered .   is something that is owned by a person such as land or personal belongings.

After viewing a detailed map of slave routes in 1860, students will be able to correctly draw a slave route on a blank map of CT and correctly name both slave and free states within the US.

The U.S. in 1860

Use the blank map of CT provided by your teacher to draw one route a slave would have taken to escape the south.

At the end of the lesson on historical dates, students will be able to create a timeline, correctly listing at least 5 historically relevant dates related to the Underground Railroad in CT.

Check out this site!

 http://teacher.scholastic.com/activities/bhistory/underground_railroad/plantation.htm

Using your notes, drag and drop the important slavery events in sequential order.

  • 1705: Slaves begin to be described as real-estate. Virginia law makers allow owners to leave slaves to relatives in their wills. This law allows masters to kill run away slaves.
  • 1787: Northwest Ordinance bans slavery in the Northwest Territory.
  • 1847: Frederick Douglas, an escaped slave, begins publishing the North Star in Rochester, New York.
  • 1860: Abraham Lincoln is elected, becoming the first Republican to win the United States Presidency.
  • 1865: Slavery is abolished in all states by the 13th Amendment to the United States Constitution.
  • 1775: American Revolution begins.
  • 1793: The Fugitive Slave Act of the United States outlaws any efforts to obstruct the capture of runaway slaves.
  • 1501: African Slaves first arrive in the New World as the result of Spanish settlement in Santo Domingo.
  • 1641: Massachusetts is the first colony to legalize slavery.
  • 1777: Vermont becomes the first state to abolish slavery.
  • 1776: Declaration of Independence is signed.
  • 1817: Frederick Douglas is born into slavery in Tuckahoe, Maryland.
  • 1849: Harriet Tubman escapes to Pennsylvania and later returns south 19 times to rescue more than 300 people.
  • 1838: Frederick Douglass escapes from slavery in Baltimore on September 3.
  • 1852: Uncle Tom's Cabin is published by Harriet Beecher Stowe. This book becomes banned in the South, while northerners turn it into a bestseller.
  • 1864: Slavery is abolished in Maryland.
  • 1863: President Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation becomes effective on January 1, 1863. It frees the slaves in Rebel territory only, and states nothing about the slaves in states that never seceded from the Union, leaving slavery intact in those border states.
  • 1861: United States Civil War begins and lasts until 1865. Claims the lives of over 623,000 people.

After conducting online research, students will be able to successfully identify both of the important figures from CT associated with the Underground Railroad and describe in one detailed paragraph for each person.

Harriet Tubman and William Still

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_iuHO7sCfbs

The William Still video is the first of a four part series.  The narrator of the video is dressed like William Still to give the viewer an authentic experience.  Please watch the first part of the video.  You can come back later to watch the remaining parts.

Write a detailed paragraph explaining the how important Harriet Tubman was to the Underground Railroad.

In the space provided, explain why William Still was known as "The Father of the Underground Railroad."