Interviewing & Hiring

Welcome to the Gordon Food Service Interviewing & Hiring course.

 

At the conclusion of this course you will be able to understand the interview process, effectively deliver an interview, and process a new hire.

This course will take approximately: 2 hrs

Please note: you may stop and return to complete the course.

Let's Get Started!

Understanding the Hiring Process

You will identify the basic hiring process steps.

Your Goal:

Find the most qualified candidate for the role you are hiring for.

 

Although the details of each step of the hiring process will vary for an Associate vs Team Leader or Manager, the steps are the same.

 

Let's take a look at the basic Store Hiring Process.

Store Process Overview

  1. Contact your recruiter informing them of an opening
  2. Position posted by a Talent Acquisition Specialist
  3. Reviewing and Screening of Candidates
  4. Face-to-Face Interview
  5. Second Interview
  6. Debrief
  7. The Offer
  8. Hire

The Recruiting Process Overview

Below is the entire recruiting process.

Identify which steps the Talent Acquisition Specialists own.

Note: this example is for hiring a new Sales Associate.

Store Process 1/3

  1. Begin Hiring Process
    • Inform your Talent Acquisition Specialist in Human Resources of a current opening so they can open a new Requisition for your opening
  2. Reviewing and Screening of Candidates
    • Use the Talent Management Suite to find, review, and screen position applicants

Definitions

Requisition: a holding place that moves applicants through the hiring process for an available position

Applicant: someone who is initially applying for the open position

Candidate: an applicant whose qualifications show that they are a potential fit for the available position

Sourcing: the process of creating a pool of applicants

You have an opening for a Sales Associate and would like to post the open position. What should you do first?

  • Contact your Talent Acquisition Specialist so they can open a requisition for you
  • Go to Monster.com and post the position there
  • Interview people in the office that express interest in the position

Kicking it off!

Applications must be completed online by all applicants.  Applicants can apply at our careers page, under “Current Opportunities”.
The expectation is that the STORE MANAGER is to be engaged in at least one of the interviews as well as the decision making process and use approved interview guides.

Stores should have business cards available to give to candidates inquiring on how to apply. Additional cards can be ordered through Mindwire, under “Store Supplies” and “HR Materials”.

Match the resource with the web location.

  • Candidate application cards
    www.gfsmindwire.com
  • Online employee application
    www.gfs.com/careers
  • Snapshot of who Gordon Food Service Store is
    http://www.gfs.com/en/gfsstore

Store Process 2/3

  1. Face-to-Face Interview
    • Interview candidates in person using approved interview guides
  2. Second Interview
    • If the first interview went well, the candidate should move forward to this step
    • At any point if you determine the candidate is not suitable for the position, select a close out reason in the candidate's application
  3. After Interview
    • Candidate evaluations and debrief with interview team

Fill in the blanks. (one lower-case word per box)

An assistant manager or will conduct the first interview using the approved interview guides.

Read the following statements and choose whether they are true or false.

  • The Store Manager must do at least one of the candidate's interviews.
  • You are allowed to complete an interview without using approved interview guides.
  • Your goal is to find the most qualified candidate for the role you are hiring for.

Store Process 3/3

Definitions

RIAH Drug screen: measures the drug molecules permanently entrapped in the hair following ingestion. The drug screen collection is to be done my a hiring manager in the store. Perform a RIAH drug screen on an associate’s first day of hire or describe the correct process for urine drug screens or body hair sample tests.

  1. The Offer
    • Phone call or face-to-face meeting with candidate to extend offer
    • RIAH Drug screen completed
  2. Hire
    • New Hire paperwork completed

Correctly sort steps 4-8 of the Interview Process

Step 1 - Contact Talent Acquisition Specialist informing them of an opening

Step 2 - Position posted by Talent Acquisition Specialist

Step 3 - Review and Screen Candidates

  • Face-to-Face Interview
    Step 4
  • Second Interview
    Step 5
  • Debrief with interview team
    Step 6
  • The Offer
    Step 7
  • Submit new hire paperwork
    Step 8

Using the Talent Management System

You will be able to view and manage the candidates in Interview Central within Talent Management Suite.

Interview Central is a tab within the TMS that allows you to rate a candidate after they have been interviewed. Using Interview Central, you can compare and contrast your candidates within open Requisitions.

The Talent Management Suite(TMS) will allow you to take a person from applicant to new hire. The TMS will store position requisitions and all materials related to hiring someone.

Recruitment Toolbox

We maintain a variety of recruitment 'tools' which we may deploy to source and hire employees. These methodologies are ever changing and their selection in a recruitment strategy depends on many variables such as position, city (including location within the city), state, cost, past history, etc.

The Recruitment Toolbox contains many of our recruitment tools; however it is not an all inclusive list. Where noted, costs will be billed back to the store.

 

 

Click here for the Recruitment Toolbox

Which of the following Recruitment Toolbox resources should be used when sourcing applicants?

  • In Store display
  • Indeed.com
  • Referral program
  • Career Fairs in prisons
Pick all that apply.

Answer the following statements true or false?

  • Gordon Food Service Careers has a Facebook recruiting page.
  • Jobcentral.com is an online sourcing tool that the stores must pay to use.
  • Internal recruitment bag stuffers are available upon request.

Talent Management Suite walkthough 1/3

Phone Screen document

Applicant Pre-Screening Guide

Watch the following video and answer the corresponding questions to overview TMS and Interview Central.

 

Where do you find TMS?

  • On Homeplate under Applications
  • On Homeplate under Other GFS Sites
  • On Homeplate under the People Services tab

Where can you find the candidate's work history if they did not provide work history in their Application?

Click on the spot in the image that represents your answer.

What is the purpose of the Reviewed tab of the Talent Pipeline?

  • Applicants who have been reviewed and a decision to move forward has not been decided.
  • Candidates who have been interviewed, but are awaiting a hiring decision.
  • A place to order food for the interview.

Talent Management Suite walkthough 2/3

Continue watching the following video and answer the corresponding questions to overview TMS and Interview Central.

 

Phone Screen Guide

Interview Guides 

Answer the following statement True or False.

  • A phone screen is necessary for all candidates.

What are we NOT looking to do in a phone screen?

  • Discover if the candidate has worked or interviewed with Gordon Food Service in the past
  • Go over drug testing policy
  • Discover salary needs
  • Find out what religion the candidate follows

Where do we initially indicate that we have informed the candidate of the Drug Screening Policy?

  • On the Applicant Pre-Screening form
  • On candidate's resume

Talent Management Suite walkthough 3/3

Adding Interviewers

Since there will be more than one manager participating in the interview, taking notes, and rating; additional interviewers must be added to the candidate's process in TMS. See the images below to see how to add interviewers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

In Interview Central, under Interviewers, choose 'Set up Interviewers'

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Choose 'Add' to add additional interviewers for notes and rating.

Watch final video and answer the corresponding questions to overview TMS and Interview Central.

 

Saving Files to F Drive

How to you get your completed Interview Guides into Interview Central?

Scan completed Interview Guides into your computer, save the document to your computer's , click Interview Central, choose candidate, choose , click Interview Notes, click Choose File, locate and upload file.

How can you quickly compare the candidates in Interview Central?

  • Choose applicant and manually rank them the Stack Ranker on right of screen.
  • After candidates have been rated, the system automatically ranks and stacks candidates (highest to lowest).
  • Choose candidate and flag them for ranking in the Candidate Comparison on left of screen.

Preparing for an Interview

You will be able to prepare for the interview by printing the application and interview guide, as well as reviewing the application.

Printing the Application & Resume

The candidate's application and resume will give you a snapshot of their qualifications as they relate to the job and detail their previous experience. The goal of printing the application and resume is to make you more knowledgeable about the candidate.

To print the application and resume:

  1. Open the candidate under Job Requisitions
  2. Choose 'Application' or 'Resume'
  3. Click the printer icon just above the Application/Resume area

Since this candidate has limited previous work experience, where is a good place to look on this resume for qualifications?

Click on the area of the image below that corresponds with your answer.

Reviewing the Application

Reviewing the Application

It is important that you not walk into the interview cold or speak in a mono-tone or robotic manor. Reviewing the candidate's application and resume allows you to instantly build better rapport. Read the application and highlight important points you want the candidate to expand on during an interview.

Here are some key points to look for:

  1. Why the candidate wants to work for Gordon Food Service Store.
    • What are their motivations for wanting to work for us.
  2. Their work experience/history to see if they job hop or have many gaps in employment. 
    • Those who job hop tend not to be dedicated workers.
  3. If no work experience, look for volunteer and extracurricular activities.
    • Volunteer or school extra-curricular activities are a great place to discover candidates' experiences and how they may benefit the role. Especially, if the candidate as little to no real world business experience.
  4. Was the candidate referred by someone?
    • Cultural fit and higher retention – Referred candidates are going to have a better understanding of Gordon Food Service Store and our company culture. They are going to have a desire to work for our company and will most likely stay longer.
  5. What is the candidate's work availability (schedule)?
    • You may have availability needs that may be easily met with this requirement.

What section of this application shows the candidate's previous work experience?

Click on the area of the image below that corresponds with your answer.

Printing the Interview Guide

Locating Approved Interview Guides

  1. Go to Home Plate
  2. Click Gordon Food Service Store menu
  3. Click Human Resources
  4. Locate appropriate Interview Guide under 'Interview Guides'

The Interview Guides will set you up for success during the interview by providing specific behavior-based questions to ask the candidate. 

Every position has designated and approved Interview Guides that must be used. In the case of a hiring a Sales Associate, there is more than one Interview Guide.

First Interview

  1. Has Work Experience:  This guide is to be used at the first interview with a candidate that has current or past work experience.
  2. In High School or has No Work Experience: This guide is to be used at the first interview with a candidate that has no or very limited work experience.

Second Interview (Note: a minimum of 2 interviews should be done before making a hiring decision)

  1. Has Work Experience: This guide is to be used at the second interview with a candidate that has current or past work experience.
  2.  In High School or No Work Experience: This guide is to be used at the second interview with a candidate that has no or very limited work experience.

Preparing Your Interview Team

  1. It is important that your interview team comes prepared for the interview. Decide who will ask which questions during the interview prior to the candidate's arrival.
  2. Inform your team that you will be in an interview and ask not to be interrupted.
  3. Interviews should be scheduled during double manager coverage, as to avoid interruptions.
  4. Due to everyone's ability to interpret answers to questions differently, all members of the interview team should take separate notes.

Important

For legal reasons, it is important to only take notes that relate to the questions asked from the interview guides.

Answer the following statements TRUE or FALSE.

  • An interview team should consist of one Assistant Manager and the Store Manager.
  • An interview team should consist of the Store Manager and the Shift Leader.
  • Decide who will ask which questions during the interview prior to the candidate's arrival.
  • Interviews should be held on the sales floor.
  • Interviews should be scheduled during double manager coverage, as to avoid interruptions.
  • Due to everyone's ability to interpret answers to questions differently, all members of the interview team should take separate notes.

Why do we need to print a copy of the candidate's application/resume?

  • So you can take notes on the application/resume during the interview
  • So we can be knowledgeable about the candidate and refer to details of the candidate's work history
Choose the best answer. 

You will be able to understand proper interview etiquette.

Rapport is the connection between two people; the spoken and unspoken words that say 'there is newly established trust' and ‘we are on the same page’. For many interviewees, this interview is their first look behind the Gordon Food Service curtain. So, first impressions are everything!  

  • Smile when you first see the candidate
  • Establish and maintain eye contact
  • Be the first to say hello and extend your hand
  • Deliver a sincere greeting
  • Use the candidate's name!
  • Avoid illegal topics such as how many children the candidate has or race-related questions. The weather is a good safe topic. (See Asking Appropriate Questions module)

In the interview guide, there is a copy of the position profile. Be sure to highlight this information with the candidate and give them a copy to take with them.

Briefly talk about Gordon Food Service Store and our company culture.

Opening the Interview:

  1. Make them feel welcome and offer them a drink of coffee or water. 
  2. Welcome to Gordon Food Service Store, My name is....
  3. We are here to interview for the ____________ position.
  4. Briefly talk about the company and the company culture. 
  5. Mention the Drug Screen Policy and a brief overview of employee benefits.
  6. We will be taking notes during the interview...

After you build rapport example:

“The purpose of this interview is for us to better get acquainted so that we can understand your capabilities and experience relative to the position of “Retail Sales Associate.”  I’ll begin by discussing your application. Things such as your education and work history (if applicable).  We will then move on to questions that will dive more into your past experiences.  Once we are done with that, we will review more about Gordon Food Service Store and questions that you may have."

Answer the following statements TRUE or FALSE

  • It is okay to take notes at the beginning of the interview while building rapport.
  • You should always briefly talk about the company and the company culture during the opening of the interview.
  • Building rapport is about establishing trust through the understanding that you and the interviewee are on the same page.
  • A good building rapport topic is the weather.

Which explanation for why you will be taking notes during the interview is the best?

  • I'll be taking notes in case you say anything suspicious that we may need to drug test you for. Will that work?
  • I’ll be taking notes during the interview. It’s my way of making sure I get all the information that we discuss so I can make a fair evaluation. I hope it won’t distract you too much.
  • I will be taking notes during this interview so I can compare your answers to other candidates' answers. Is that okay with you?

Things to watch out for

The Talkative Interviewee: When the interviewee talks too much, digresses, or occupies too much of the interview time with "chit-chat", then the interviewer does not have sufficient time left to gain the necessary information about the candidate's skills.

Reliance on Your intuition: Relying on your first impression of the interviewee may push you to give credibility to your natural biases against certain people. Use your intuition to ask questions of the interviewee that yield specific examples that relate to the skills required for the job.

  • Halo/Horn Effect: When a candidate comes in nicely dressed and starts off with a very bubbly personality, you may not dig further into this person and let positive first impression overshadow any negative traits.  This would be the “halo effect”.  On the flip side, a person may not dress well and you focus only on the negative and do not dig further to find the positives on this person.  This would be the “horn effect”. 

Your Memory: No one can remember everything about every person they interview. It is necessary to take notes of an interviewee’s responses to questions.  You will be going back to this information at a later time.

The Closed-ended Questions: Questions that lead to a Yes or No response will cause you to follow up with yet another question. Ask behavioral based questions (see Asking Appropriate Questions module) to get specific and thoughtful responses from the interviewee.

Which is a good refocusing statement(s) to deliver to an overly talkative interviewee?

  • Your cooperation is greatly appreciated, could we please move on?
  • Our time is limited and I want to understand some additional and specific points about your skills.
  • That sounds great! We only have a few more minutes. Do you mind if I ask you a couple more specific questions?
Pick all that may apply.

Understanding Competencies

You will be able to define the competencies of a Gordon Food Service Store employee.

A Competency is the ability of an individual to use existing knowledge, skills, and abilities to do a job properly. It is also the framework for selecting the right person to perform a specific task or function.

Why do we interview against competencies?

Our competencies were selected by a team consisting of Human Resources, Store Managers, Assistant Managers, and District Managers and are the core of our interview process. Generic or vague responses don’t give us enough info about the candidates. So, asking questions like "tell me about yourself" can yield answers that vary greatly. Using competencies allows us to see if the candidate is the best match for our job.

Competencies for hiring a Store Sales Associate:
Work Experience Non Work Experience
Service Oriented Integrity
Results Oriented Results Oriented
Sales Oriented Teamwork
Living the Culture Communication
Teamwork  
Integrity  
Communication  

Why do we have different competencies based on experience?

Someone that has never had a job will not be able to answer questions on service, but can talk to a time they've been on a sports team, school project, etc.

Click here for Competency Definitions

What is a competency? (one lower-case word per box)

A Competency is the of an individual to use existing , skills, and abilities to do a job properly.

Why is the statement, "Tell me about yourself", a perfect statement to discover that the candidate is the right person for the job?

  • The candidate will open up and tell you everything that you need to know about their knowledge, skills, and abilities.
  • It isn't. "Tell me about yourself" can yield generic and vague responses that will not help you during an interview.
  • Not only is it a great way to build rapport, but it's one question that will help you gauge if the candidate is a good culture-fit.

Why do we have different competencies for people with work experience verses no work experience?

  • To make it easier to choose an interview guide. If the candidate is in high school, I can just choose the High School interview guide.
  • Someone that has never had a job will not be able to answer questions on Service, but can talk to a time they've been on a sports team, school project, etc.
Choose the best answer.

Match the individual contributor competencies up with their definitions. 1/2

  • - Strives to understand and meet the needs of customers, employees and suppliers
    Service Oriented
  • - Effective in managing execution of their work
    Results Oriented
  • - Deals with issues directly and with truth
    Integrity
  • - Participates collaboratively in their work environment
    Teamwork

Match the individual contributor competencies up with their definitions. 2/2

  • -­ Explores customers needs
    Sales Oriented
  • -­ Individually contributes to company’s overall mission
    Living the Culture
  • -­ Expresses thoughts clearly and concisely
    Communication

You will be able to define our Cornerstone Values.

Our customers come first. We’re driven to exceed their expectations by listening, leading, solving problems, and delivering what we promise. Strong relationships break down barriers and promote innovation and cooperation. By working as an open-minded, responsive team, we achieve excellence.
Our future depends on the success of each employee. In an atmosphere of dignity and diversity, our appreciation for each other’s talents and contributions keeps us at our best. We encourage productivity and efficiency, and there are rewards for jobs well done. Sometimes it’s a financial incentive, other times an award, always a genuine thank-you.
Our single-minded quest to maximize customer satisfaction leads us to be a low-cost producer that emphasizes results. The best relationships are founded on honesty, trust, and respect. We say what we will do, and then we do it.
Personal and professional growth depends on teamwork. By sharing knowledge, skills, ideas, and effort, we benefit our customers, ourselves, and our communities.  

 

Our purpose is to serve our customers with the highest-quality food service products and services. We achieve this purpose through innovative systems and the spirit and integrity of our people.

Our Cornerstone Values are the principles we believe in and follow in every interaction, and how we evaluate our performance and measure our success. 

We encourage productivity and efficiency, and there are rewards for jobs well done. Sometimes it’s a financial incentive, other times an award, always a genuine thank-you.

Choose the Cornerstone Value that matches the statement above.

Our future depends on the success of each employee. In an atmosphere of dignity and diversity, our appreciation for each other’s talents and contributions keeps us at our best.

Choose the Cornerstone Value that matches the statement above.

Asking Appropriate Questions

You will be able to identify key elements of the candidate’s application and guide the conversation using behavior-based questions from the Interview Guide.

You are now going to learn about the interview questions as these are the heart of our interview.  It is good to review work and school history with a candidate but your interview questions are going to help you learn more about the candidate and what they can do on the job.

Let’s start by learning about behavioral and situational questions.

What is a Behavioral question?

​Behavioral interview questions are past-oriented in that they ask respondents to relate what they did in past jobs or life situations that are relevant to that particular job’s knowledge, skills, and abilities required for success.

Based on the image above, all things being equal, where do you predict the next arrow will land?

The idea is that past behavior is the best predictor of future performance in similar situations.

By asking questions about how job applicants have handled situation in the past that are similar to those they will face on the job, employers can gauge how they might perform in future situations.

Behavioral questions begin with statements such as:

  • Have you ever...
  • Tell me a time when...
  • Give me a specific situation when...
  • Describe a time when...
Pick all that may apply.

What is a Situational question?

Situational interview questions ask job applicants to imagine a set of circumstances and then indicate how they would respond in that situation or a similar situation.

An advantage is that situational questions allow respondents who have had no direct job experience relevant to a particular question to provide a hypothetical response. 

Set the candidate up for success

Open the behavioral section of your interview with statements like this:

  • "I will now be asking you questions to get to know more about your experience. As I ask these questions, I will be looking for specific examples of the situation you faced or were in, what you did in that situation, and how things turned out.”
  • “In this next section of questions, I will be looking for specific examples, kind of like you will be telling me a story.”

Situational questions will begin with statements such as:

  • How would you handle...
  • Give me an example of...
  • What would you do...
Pick all that may apply.

Probing for missing or incomplete information

Remember to acknowledge your candidate's responses with positive reinforcement. This will encouragement more responses from your candidates. For example:

  • "Sounds like that was a rewarding experience."
  • Inaudible - smile
  • "Sounds like you really helped that customer."

There may be times where you encounter an incomplete application or resume. Explore these gaps with probing questions like... 

  • “It says here that while working at Bob’s Grocery Store that you were a cashier.  Tell me more about that.”

  • “I noticed a gap in jobs between 2011 and 2012. What can you tell me about that?"

  • For people with little or no work experience, ask questions regarding school: “What did/do you like most about school?”

You will be able to explain a proper Situation, Action, Result response.

It is important to learn how to get a proper answer to your behavioral question as we are looking for a specific example to something a person has done. To find out how someone has behaved in a situation you may have to probe and ask Follow-up questions. When we ask behavioral questions in an interview, we often get vague responses.

In Other Words

  1. Situation: What happened?
  2. Action: What work did you specifically do?
  3. Result: What was the outcome of your response?

The purpose of this process is to discover if the candidate is the best fit for the job by using specific and targeted questions. Stick to the Situation, Action, Result flow and you will have success.

You will be able to prompt for a full Situation, Action, Result response from candidate.

When a candidate answers your questions, you should always ask yourself: "Did I get all three of the key elements of the interview question?"

If you didn't, feel free to follow-up with the candidate by asking them to give you the missing parts. A follow-up question is an open-ended question that is going to help you get all the components of your interview question.

Example: "It sounds like the Situation was...and you took the Action of...  What was the Result of what you did?"

Drag and drop the follow-up questions under their proper area.

  • Describe that to me...
  • What exactly did you do...
  • How did that turn out...

Drag and drop the follow-up questions under their proper area.

  • Tell me a specific time that you did...
  • Tell me the steps that you took to...
  • What happened...

Drag and drop the follow-up questions under their proper area.

  • Give me an instance when you did that...
  • What was your specific role in this...
  • What was the outcome...

Following-up 1/2

Next we are going to look at some examples of interviews and asking follow-up questions.

You ask a behavioral question and the candidate tells you about the Situation that they are involved in but do not provide you with any more information.  That is only part of the story. You will need to ask the candidate additional questions to learn what was their Action and/or Result.  

Here's an example.

Behavioral Question: Tell me about a time you went above and beyond for a customer.

Candidates Response: I just had one recently where I was able to help an elderly lady that had come into our restaurant with a walker and was struggling to get her food to the table.

What component do we need follow-up on? 

In this instance, we have the Situation, but the candidate has not given us their specific Action or the Result to the situation.  You now need to probe by asking a follow-up question.  Follow up questions can be very simple statements to draw more information out of the candidate.

Following-up 2/2

Your next probing question: What was the Result?

Candidates Response: She was very thankful for the help.  This lady actually comes in every Tuesday and I help her with her food.

Do we need further follow-up on the original interview question?

No. We have all the components to understand the whole story.

Situation: Candidate noticed a customer who needed assistance getting food to their table.

Action: Candidate helped customer with their tray and got them seated.

Result: Customer was very thankful for the help and comes back weekly because of the service.

Your next probe: Tell me more about that.

Candidates Response: She had come to the counter to order and was using a walker and was struggling to get her food to the table so I went and helped her with her tray and got her seated at a table.

What component do we need follow-up on? 

We now have more on her Situation and Action taken but don’t know the final outcome or result. Another follow-up question is needed.

Which element(s) do we have in the following exchange?

  • Situation
  • Action
  • Result
  • No Elements

Behavioral Question: Tell me something unique you have done to promote or sell a product or service at your job.

Candidates Response: Oh, I do that all the time.

What is your first follow up question? (one lower-case word)

Can you give me a  time that you promoted a product or service?

What element(s) do we have now?

  • Situation
  • Action
  • Result
  • All Elements

Your first probing question: Can you give me a specific time that you promoted a product or service?

Candidates Response: Yes, there was one selling contest that I won.

What is a good next probing question getting the candidate to be more specific?

  • Tell me more.
  • Tell me more about the contest an what exactly did you do to win?
  • You are being a bit vague. Be more specific.
Pick all that may apply.

What element(s) has the candidate given us in this response? (Pick all that may apply)

  • Situation
  • Action
  • Result

Candidates Response: While I was working at the restaurant we had a contest to see who could sell the most desserts in one week and I won. I made sure to talk to all my tables about our new deserts and brought out a tray of sample deserts so they could see how good they looked.  I also talked about my new favorite one which was a chocolate chip cheesecake.  I ended up selling that one the most and sold the most deserts for the week.

Closed-ended questions

Any question that can be answered with a simple  response is a closed-ended question. Any question that requires   is open-ended.

Probing questions

Closed-ended question: “Do you enjoy working with customers?”

Answer: “Yes.”

Open-ended questions: “Tell me about an enjoyable customer interaction that you had.”

Answer: There was a time….

The two words “what” and “describe” are key elements of open-ended questions that help avoid vague responses.

What element(s) has the candidate given us in this response?

  • Situation
  • Action
  • Result
  • No Elements

Behavioral question (Service Oriented): Tell me about a time that you went above and beyond for a customer. What did you do?
Candidate’s response: I researched the product and worked with customer to bring in a special item for her. She told my manager how thankful she was that we could get what she needed.  She places the same order every week now.

What is the best follow-up question to this candidate statement?

  • What did the customer need?
  • How did that make you feel?
  • What did you order for them.
"I researched the product and worked with the customer to bring in a special item in for her. She told my manager how thankful she was that we could get what she needed.  She places the same order every week now."

You will be able to differentiate between legal and illegal topics and questions.

FYI

Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 is a federal law which prohibits employers, with at least fifteen employees, from discriminating in employment based on race, color, religion, sex (gender), age, disability and national origin.  
Other laws that need to be taken into consideration are The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), Age Discrimination in Employment Act (ADEA), and Pregnancy Discrimination Act. Finally, Gordon Food Service does not require any form of physical abilities test.

 

What are the key learns from the Interviewing Do's and Don'ts video?

  • Prepare in advance
  • Only Ask questions related to the candidate's ability to do the job
  • Listen more than you talk
  • Take detailed notes
  • To stay within our legal bounds, do not ask questions that may reveal marital status, age, race, color, religion, sexual orientation, disability, and national origin. If any of that information is revealed, do not note it.
Pick all that may apply.

Follow the Interview Guides

Teamwork

Rate the Competency: 5=Superior, 4= Above Average, 3=Acceptable, 2=Below Average, 1=Unacceptable 

Tell me about something you’ve done to help a team member to improve their performance.

Situation -

Action -

Result -

The Interview Guides are designed to get you asking the best questions and noting the answers in an easy manner. See example below.

Confirm that these questions are legal to ask. 1/3

  • How many children do you have?
  • Can you work from 7 AM to 2 PM on Saturday?
  • What country are you or your family from?
  • What is your native language?
  • Are you able to lift up to 50 pounds of product and move it from shopping cart to shopping cart?
  • How tall are you?

If the question is legal, answer TRUE.

If the question is illegal, answer FALSE.

Confirm that these questions are legal to ask. 2/3

  • Have you ever been arrested?
  • Do you own a car?
  • What hours and days can you work?
  • How old are you?
  • What church do you attend?
  • When did you graduate from High School?

If the question is legal, answer TRUE.

If the question is illegal, answer FALSE.

The Law on Interview Questions

You may also find at times that despite carefully crafted questions, an applicant will volunteer information about his or her life that could be grounds for a discrimination suit.

Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 is a federal law which prohibits employers, with at least fifteen employees, from discriminating in employment based on race, color, religion, sex (gender), age, disability and national origin. 

Other laws that need to be taken into consideration are The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), Age Discrimination in Employment Act (ADEA), and Pregnancy Discrimination Act.

"The best defense is to not acknowledge that you heard it” and do NOT write it down.

 

If you are “curious” about something, you are better off not asking it.  “Curiosity” most likely will lead to an unintended, illegal question. The best way to avoid illegal questions is to stick to your interview guide.  

Play the video below to see an in-exhaustive list of "no-no" questions.

Confirm that these questions are legal to ask. 3/3

  • Are you a United States citizen?
  • Can you perform the duties of the job you are applying for?
  • What are your child care arrangements?
  • What disabilities do you have?

If the question is legal, answer TRUE.

If the question is illegal, answer FALSE.

Note Taking

Short hand tips

When taking notes, the candidate may respond with lots of detail that is difficult to write quickly. Try using the following short hand tips to speed up your note taking.

It is important to take notes. You will need to go back to your notes to review the candidates with the other managers. You will need to be able to compare each candidate so you need to remember what was said.

Note taking during the interview process is a necessary step to gather the information that is given by a job candidate.  

Important things to remember:

  • Inform the candidate that you will be taking notes in order to recall the information that they are sharing.
  • Don't trust your own memory, let your notes remember pertinent information for you.
  • Use the structure of Situation, Action, Result in the Interview Guides to note the candidate's response.
  • Stay on topic and note positive and negative responses.
  • Write down what they say; not your opinion of what they said.
  • If you have a talkative candidate or the candidate is not giving you a specific example, stop writing.

Is the following note a Good Note or a Bad Note?

  • Good Note
  • Bad Note
Note: Candidate looks disheveled and in their mid-50's.

Is the following note a Good Note or a Bad Note?

  • Good Note
  • Bad Note
Note: Sucesfly mediated disgrment betwn 2 emp.

Is the following note a Good Note or a Bad Note?

  • Good Note
  • Bad Note
Note: Candidate has 2 kids.

Is the following note a Good Note or a Bad Note?

  • Good Note
  • Bad Note
Note: Sugg better product to meet the cust need.

Scoring an Interview

You will be able to properly score candidates responses.

Now that your interview is complete and the candidate has left, you need to score your candidate’s responses.  Each interviewer is responsible for scoring their own interview guide.

If you are the first interviewer, you will need to score your candidate’s responses and make a decision to forward the candidate on for another interview or close the candidate out.

Scoring the responses

Each question on your guide should be given a score. 

On your interview guide, there is a section next to the competency name where you can circle your score and a page later in the guide where you can record your scores together.

Scores

5 - Superior Answer - What would one expect or want an outstanding candidate to give as the best possible answer?

4 - Above Average  

3 - Acceptable - What is an acceptable answer that one would expect a qualified candidate to give?

2- Below Average

1 – Unacceptable - What would one expect as a poor answer from a candidate who shows little aptitude or skill on this job requirement?

5 = Best possible answer. A person that goes above and beyond with all that they attempt.

4 = Fantastic answer. Someone who has Shift Leader potential.

3 = Status quo. Doing what you are supposed to do for the job.

2 = Not the most optimal answer. Seriously think about why you are considering hiring this person.

What are some reasons for closing a candidate from the interview process?

  • If they take too many pauses while answering our questions.
  • If we score the candidate with a majority of ratings below a "3".
  • If the candidate uses foul language during the interview.
  • Shows poor eye contact or is inappropriately dressed.
Pick all that apply.

If you close a candidate based on foul language or being inappropriately dressed, you must...

  • note your reasons in the interview guide.
  • let the candidate know during the interview that they will not be selected to continue with the hiring process.
  • draw an "X" on their application.

After Scoring

Now that you have scored your candidate, you will need to use this information to determine it the candidate will receive a second interview (note, all stores should be doing a minimum of 2 interviews before making a hiring decision.)

  • Closing out a candidate: If your scoring determines that you will close out the candidate, enter a rejection code in TMS.
  • Moving a candidate on: If your scoring determines that you will move your candidate on for a second interview, you will schedule them with another manager (the Store Manager must complete one of the 2 interviews).
  • Interview Debrief: After the second interview is completed, you and the other manager need to schedule a time to do an interview debrief.  An interview debrief needs to be completed whenever two (or more) interviews have been conducted.

Each interviewer should give their scoring information to the other interviewer and they should discuss some of the responses received during their interviews.  If there are any questions or concerns, this is your chance to discuss them as a team.

Once both interviewers have discussed their scoring, a hiring decision can be made.  

Why is it important to conduct an interview debrief?

  • Get two different perspectives of the candidate.
  • Decide whether a 3rd interview is necessary.
  • Get more buy in from the other participating managers.
Answer the statements below TRUE or FALSE.

Scoring Exercise 1/4

Read the Candidate Response to the Behavioral Interview question below and give the candidate’s response a numerical score, using the rating system under the competency name.

Click the appropriate competency rating for the candidate's response.

Note: all answers contain the three elements of – Situation/Action/Result.

Scoring Exercise 2/4

Read the Candidate Response to the Behavioral Interview question below and give the candidate’s response a numerical score, using the rating system under the competency name.

Click the appropriate competency rating for the candidate's response.

Note: all answers contain the three elements of – Situation/Action/Result.

Scoring Exercise 3/4

Read the Candidate Response to the Behavioral Interview question below and give the candidate’s response a numerical score, using the rating system under the competency name.

Click the appropriate competency rating for the candidate's response.

Note: all answers contain the three elements of – Situation/Action/Result.

Scoring Exercise 4/4

Read the Candidate Response to the Behavioral Interview question below and give the candidate’s response a numerical score, using the rating system under the competency name.

Click the appropriate competency rating for the candidate's response.

Note: all answers contain the three elements of – Situation/Action/Result.

Click Yes or No for whether the candidate should continue to a Second Interview based on the following scores.

Click Yes or No for whether the candidate would make a good hire based on the following post second interview scores.

Processing a New Employee

Processing Introduction

Let's be real. We know processing paperwork can be boring at times; but we also recognize that in the boring is a massive amount of important information to help you get your new employee ready for their first day. Let's take the journey together!

New Hires

New Hire Paperwork

Due to the frequency of which laws change, New Hire Paperwork should be freshly printed for each new hire. New Hire Paperwork is located on HomePlate under Gordon Food Service Store/Human Resources/New Hire[store only], select New Hire Rehire Packets – Part Time.  Please ensure that you select the appropriate state checklist for your store.

(Hint: You may also search in Google Drive, enter “New Hire Rehire Packets”)

Note, if your Sales Associate lives in a different state than your store (i.e. Clarksville IN store, employee lives in KY) you will need to have the employee complete tax forms for the state that they live in.

Print checklist for your position and state and follow provided steps.

Compliance Center

Any new hire paperwork to be completed by new hire must be completed using Compliance Center. Watch the following video for details on Compliance Center.

 

Applications: Record Keeping Requirements

Applications and documentation regarding the employment process must be kept for all INTERVIEWED candidates. 

  • If a candidate has been interviewed, we must keep their information for three years.  
  • Applications and interview notes for candidates that have been interviewed and not hired should be sent up to Store Human Resources.
  • Along with the printed application you must send any support materials such as pre-screening forms, interview guides, and references stapled to the application.  Be sure to document the reason for not hiring the individual on a separate piece of paper.  Do not write on applications!
  •  Please note the month and year that the application was received.

Employee Personnel Files

Personnel files are maintained electronically in OnBase. For instruction on how to view and upload documents to OnBase, click the link below.

Medical Record Files

Although most documents for each employee can be retained in single personnel file, the following types of documents must be kept separately. The store must ensure that all employee medical records and information remains confidential and protected from unauthorized use and disclosure. Medical records may include all of the following

  • Last page of the original pre-employment drug test including employee signature.
  • Family and medical leave request forms when an employee voluntarily discloses the nature of his or her illness on the form.
  • Return to work releases.
  • Workers' compensation records.
  • Information about disabilities being accommodated under the ADA.
  • Any other records that relate in any way to an employee's medical history. These can be doctor’s notes, drug tests, etc.

As a rule, if you are unsure if a particular health related document is to be placed in the medical file or not, place the document in the medical file by uploading document(s) to OnBase.

Due to the frequency of which laws change, New Hire Paperwork should be freshly printed for each new hire. Where can you find the New Hire Paperwork?

  • Homeplate/Gordon Food Service Store/Human Resources...Choose New Hire[Store Only]/New Hire Rehire Packets
  • Archived in your store filing cabinet
  • Go to GoogleDrive and perform search for 'New Hire Rehire'

Putting it All Together

Final Assessment

You are ready to begin your final assessment.

The purpose of this section of the Interviewing and Hiring eLearning is to review the key points taught in this course.

This assessment is not timed.

Good Luck!

What is the goal of interviewing and hiring?

  • Find the candidate with the most open availability.
  • Find the most qualified candidate for the role you are hiring for.
  • Find the best candidate.

What is the first step of the interview process?

  • The Offer
  • Debrief
  • First Interview
  • Contact your recruiter informing them of an opening

Where does the RIAH drug screen take place for Stores?

  • Gordon Food Service Home Office after the offer is given
  • Your local Urgent Care on the first day of hire
  • In the store on the first day of hire

How many interviews should a candidate go through before a hiring decision is made?

  • 2
  • 1
  • 3

How many interviews should the Store Manager participate in?

  • The first interview
  • The second interview
  • The first, second, or both interviews

Where do you order Candidate Application cards?

  • Homeplate
  • Gordon Food Service Careers page
  • Mindwire

When should the interview team debrief take place?

  • After the first interview
  • After the second interview
  • You don't need to debrief

Where do you find Interview Central?

  • On the Talent Management Suite in the Recruiting section
  • On Homeplate/Gordon Food Service Stores/Human Resources and choose Interview Resources
  • In your store computer's Start Menu under Apps

According to this screenshot, how many candidates are in the Second Interview phase?

Click on the area that represents your answer.

You have chosen to interview a candidate who is still in high school and has no job experience. Which Interview Guide are you going to use?

  • Associate Guide - HS No Experience 1
  • Associate Guide - HS No Experience 2
  • Associate Guide - Work Experience 1
  • Associate Guide - Work Experience 2

You have chosen to give a second interview to a candidate who has experience working for a grocery store and a restaurant over the past 3 years. Which Interview Guide are you going to use?

  • Associate Guide - Work Experience 1
  • Associate Guide - Work Experience 2
  • Associate Guide - HS No Experience 1
  • Associate Guide - HS No Experience 2

What do we click to add additional interviewers in the Talent Management Suite?

Click the area that represents your answer.

Where do we scan completed Interview Guides to?

  • A Drive
  • C Drive
  • F Drive

Answer the following statements TRUE or FALSE.

  • During an interview, only take notes that relate to the questions from the Interview Guides.
  • During an interview, one manager should be taking notes while the other asks the questions.
  • Applications, pre-screening documents, and interview notes for candidates that have been interviewed and not hired should be sent up to Store Human Resources.

The candidate comes in nicely dressed and starts off with a very bubbly personality. You choose not to dig further into this person and let the positive first impression overshadow any negative traits.

  • Horn-halo Effect
  • Halo-horn Effect
  • Mystical Unicorn Effect
What is this an example of?

Questions that lead to a Yes or No response that cause you to follow up with yet another question.

  • Close-ended questions
  • Open-ended questions
  • General probes
What is this a definition of?

Which competency is defined by these points?

  • Teamwork
  • Service Oriented
  • Communication
  • Integrity
  • Responds quickly to requests with a sense of urgency
  • Builds positive relationships
  • Strives to understand and meet the needs of customers, employees and suppliers

Which competency is defined by these points?

  • Teamwork
  • Integrity
  • Results Oriented
  • Living the Culture
  • Participates collaboratively in their work environment
  • Takes initiative and makes decisions to support team objectives
  • Able to resolve interpersonal conflicts

Fill in the blanks in the following statement.

​Behavioral interview questions are   in that they ask respondents to relate what they did in jobs or that are relevant to that particular job’s required for success.

“How would you handle…” and “What would you do…” are examples of what type of interview questions?

  • Situational
  • Behavioral
  • Probing for missing or incomplete information

“I noticed a gap in jobs between 2011 and 2012 what can you tell me about that?" is an example of what type of interview question?

  • Behavioral
  • Situational
  • Probing for missing or incomplete information

What is the proper response structure we look for when asking behavior-based questions?

  • Action
  • Result
  • Situation

“Tell me the steps you took to..” is a follow up statement to get the candidate to answer which part of the behavior-based question response?

  • Situation
  • Action
  • Response

Identify the legal question(s):

Choose the answer(s) that represent your answer.

What score is this the definition for?

  • 1 - Unacceptable
  • 3 - Acceptable
  • 5 - Superior
An answer that one would expect a qualified candidate to give.

If we score the candidate with a majority of ratings below a "3", what should we do with the candidate?

  • Note your reason in the interview guide.
  • Close the candidate out of the interview process in the Talent Management Suite.
  • Close them out of the interview process in the Talent Management Suite and note your reason in the interview guide.
  • Call the candidate and give them their scores.

Scoring Exercise

Read the Candidate Response to the Behavioral Interview question below and give the candidate’s response a numerical score, using the rating system under the competency name.

Click the appropriate competency rating for the candidate's response.

YOU MADE IT!

You have completed your assessment. At this point, you should be able to understand the interview process, effectively deliver an interview, and process a new hire.

The final module of this course will give you contact information and resources for finding help on Interviewing and Hiring.

Finding Help

You will be able to reference who your Talent Acquisition Specialists are.

Our Talent Acquisition team is here to assist you with your hiring needs.

Locate your recruiter's information on this contact sheet.

Department Requests & Service Level Agreements sheet

You will be able to find hard copies of Interviewing and Hiring Documentations.

What's NEXT

  1. Work with the Management team to become involved in the next round of interviews
    • Observe (3) interview’s with a potential Sales Associate
  2. Sit in with the Manager issuing the interview
    • Participate in any follow-up discussion with the Management team after the interviews have taken place
  3. Work side-by-side with your Assistant/Store Manager during the New Hire Paperwork and RIAH Drug Screen process for the next new hire Sales Associate
    • Assist with organizing the proper paperwork
    • Assist with administering the RIAH drug screen, filling out the drug screen paperwork, and preparing to mail the paperwork

Congratulations on completing the Gordon Food Service Store Interviewing & Hiring eLearning. Below is a link to helpful resources that will help you move forward.

Recruitment Documents

Click here to view recruitment documents on Homeplate

Completing this Course

When you complete all the modules in this course, please return to the Home page by clicking the Home button(upper left)

then click the Finish Course button(upper right) to complete the course and submit your score to the LMS.