Engaging Resistant Students in Science

 

Course information

Course Syllabus

Course Syllabus: Engaging Resistant Students in Science

01/01/2019 to 03/1/2019

 Faculty Contact

Ting Li

[email protected]

 Course Description

K-12 Science teacher professional development course. Investigate reluctant student behaviors, identify 3 Dimension framework strategies to engage students into science learning, and apply those strategies to design lessons for K-12 science students. Evaluate the design based on the data collection after the lesson and improve the design based on the peer-reviewed reflection.

 Course Introduction

There is an obvious gap between performance of students from different backgrounds in science learning. Science teachers have problems engaging all students in the classroom. Students from different background include economically disadvantaged students, students with learning disabilities, racial and ethnic groups, English language learners, students in alternative education, girls, gifted and talented students. Those teachers need to learn specific strategies and how to apply them in the lesson design. Learning how to engage all students in science classrooms will help teachers design more efficient lessons to close the gap between different students.

 Course Outcomes

Course outcomes are in the form of Learning Goals and their related Competencies and Learning Objectives. Learning objectives are the steps to achieving a competency. Competencies are the steps in achieving a learning goal. This course includes the following learning goals:

Module 1

Terminal Objective: Learners will identify students who are having problems to be engaged such as students in poverty, learning disability, ELL, girls.

Enabling Objectives:

1.1. Learners will identify problems they have when they are failing to engage all students.

1.2. Learners will summarize the main factors causing their problem of failing to engage all students.

1.3. Learners will analyze the students’ behaviors in case studies and make connections to their own students.

Module 2

Terminal Objective: Learners will specify strategies used for specific students’ reluctant behaviors.

Enabling Objectives:

1.1. Leaners will compare different strategies used for their students’ groups.

1.2. Learners will choose two or more strategies based on their students’ specific needs.

Module 3

Terminal Objective: Learners will apply strategies to design lessons engaging all students.

Enabling Objectives:

1.1. Learners design a lesson with one or two strategies chosen by themselves to engage students.

1.2. Learners share and revise the lesson plans with feedback from others.

1.3. Learners conduct and reflect their lesson plans. Discuss a rubric and design a second plan to meet the new standard.

Each project contains a complete review of the competencies and learning objectives required to achieve each of the learning goals related to this course.

 Course Materials

The materials will be posted online, and additional materials could be purchased through  

the link: NGSS For All Students 

 

Class Guidelines

To assist you in your efforts to master the knowledge and competencies necessary to be successful, this course is structured according to the following guidelines:

Opportunities for refining and resubmitting work – are provided when you demonstrate on initial submissions an earnest attempt to meet performance requirements. Faculty will work with you if you are struggling to meet performance requirements to earn a passing evaluation. In such situations, the faculty will offer you targeted feedback on specific project-related competencies and direct you to incorporate the feedback and resubmit your project work. More information is contained under Grading Information below.

Communicating regularly with your faculty – is encouraged. Your faculty is interested in your success and is available to respond to questions, discuss details of projects, direct you to additional resources and help you create a plan for moving on to the next course in your program. You can expect faculty to respond to or confirm receipt of your inquiries within twenty-four (24) hours. Check your classroom for guidance on the best way to contact your faculty member.

Remaining actively engaged in the classroom community is important – to build a network of support throughout your program. You are encouraged to get to know other students in the class and engage in an active learning community through online interactions, team work, and participation in opportunities for live online meetings.

 Grading Information

Your project work will be evaluated based on how well you demonstrate your abilities in terms of competencies associated with a project (see Course Outcomes above). Projects are evaluated using a rubric that states the competencies associated with the project. Faculty offer advice on any/all competencies in the rubric, especially when such advice may help you improve your future work. Faculty will provide feedback on projects within four (4) calendar days of submission.

Submitting Work

You are going to use this google classroom to submit your assignments and post your discussions to interact with your instructor and peers. Access to YouTube, google docs, and websites or Apps used to make infographic are required for this class.

Scheduled Due Dates: Assignments have a scheduled due date, as posted in the Class and Submission Schedule and in the Class Calendar. This is the point where faculty members evaluate your entire project submission using a formal rubric for the purposes of determining a final project grade. The faculty member evaluates your performance in relation to all project-related competencies. Feedback and final grades are posted in the gradebook. While there are opportunities for refining and resubmitting work, you are strongly encouraged to meet scheduled due dates. See the guidelines for Resubmission of Work below.

Submit projects with attachments according to the instructions provided in the project steps. Assign filenames as last name first initial-assignment.doc * (with no spaces) e.g., doej-assign1.xls or doej-midterm.doc.

Submit projects to your individual Assignments Folder, unless otherwise specified in the project instructions.

Evaluation Criteria

Assignments are evaluated on the following scale and are defined as:

  • Meets Performance Requirements (MP) - meets all competencies related to a project at a satisfactory level, equating to a grade of B
  • Does not Meet Performance Requirements (NP) – does not meet all competencies related to a project at a satisfactory level, equating to a grade of F

There are two important evaluation (grading) criteria to keep in mind:

  1. You must earn an evaluation of “Meets Performance Requirements” (MP) for all assignment to earn a passing grade.
  2. You must earn an evaluation of MP on all assignments to successfully complete and pass this course.

The project overall grade is assigned by the faculty. Every individual competency must receive at least an MP for the overall assignment to receive an MP. If even one competency is not demonstrated sufficiently to receive at least an MP evaluation, you will be offered advice and an opportunity to rework/resubmit the deliverable provided there is sufficient time remaining before the end of the semester. See the section on Resubmission of Work below for limitations on resubmitting work. If your resubmitted work reflects at least a minimum MP for each related competency, only then will the overall evaluation be assigned. If you decide not to resubmit your work, if there is not sufficient time remaining before the end of the semester to resubmit the work, or if after resubmissions the work still does not meet all performance requirements as specified in the project’s associated competencies, then the evaluation of NP will be assigned.

Resubmission of Work

When a competency is not met, the faculty will record specific comments, advice, and feedback and offer you an opportunity to rework and resubmit your project. You and the faculty will agree upon a resubmission date.

 Project Descriptions

The following describe the projects you will complete in this course:

Module 1: What is the problem? In this module, you will identify students’ reluctant behaviors and the reason behind those behaviors. Such as students in poverty, learning disability, and ELL.

Module 2: 3-D learning framework Module 2 you explore how different types of reluctant behaviors could be addressed through 3-D learning strategies. And analyze how the strategies can help in creating an engaging learning classroom.

Module 3: Design an Engaging Lesson In the final module, you are expected to apply what you’ve discovered through the previous modules. The goal of this assignment is to apply what you have discovered about 3-D framework. You will design a lesson to apply to your class, collect the data from your students, share the data and your reflection with other learners. Design another lesson based on feedback and your reflection.

 Academic Policies

Academic Policies and Guidelines

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY

As a member of the education community that honors integrity and respect for others you are expected to maintain a high level of personal integrity in your academic work at all times. Your work should be original and must not be reused in other courses.

CLASSROOM CIVILITY

Students are expected to work together cooperatively, and treat fellow students and faculty with respect, showing professionalism and courtesy in all interactions.

COURSE EVALUATION SURVEY

We value students' feedback. You will be asked to complete an online evaluation toward the end of the term. The primary purpose of this evaluation process is to assess the effectiveness of classroom instruction in order to provide the best learning experience possible and make continuous improvements to every class. Responses are kept confidential. Please take full advantage of this opportunity to provide your feedback.

GRADING POLICY 

Grading policy

 

LEARNING MANAGEMENT SYSTEM SUPPORT

When have questions about the technology, course sources, and assignment, please e-mail instructor at [email protected] 

 

Class & Assignment Schedule

Engaging Resistant Students in Science 

Timeline of Activities and Due dates

Module 1

Deliverable

Time

Description

 .

Assignment 1.1

Week 1

(Day 3)

List the most common disengage behaviors in your teaching experience and propose some reasons cause those behaviors.

Ass. 1.2

Week 1

(Day 5)

Submit the work for lab ICE in Alcohol. Explain the engaging level of learning experience compare to your own teaching experience.

Ass. 1.3

Week 2

(Day 8)

Submit your summary for the cause of reluctant behaviors in science classrooms.

Module 2 

Deliverable 

Time

Description

Ass. 2.1

Week 2

(Day 10)

Access the Discussion: How did your strategies work in your class to engage students?

Ass. 2.2

Week 3

(Day 15)

Post your infographic to the discussion to summarize the 3-D learning design strategies and compare those strategies to effective strategies you or your peers have used.

Ass. 2.3

Week 3

(Day 21)

Compare the 3-D learning design strategies and the successful strategies in previous lessons you have read in the case studies. Explain how those strategies are used in the case studies.

Ass. 2.4

Week 4

(Day 28)

Choose strategies you are going to use to design a lesson to engage students in science learning. And state the reasons to show the connections between you targeted behaviors and the strategies you choose.

Module 3

Deliverable 

Milestone

Description

Ass 3.1

Week 5

(Day 35)

Design a lesson to engage all students with the strategies you choose, make sure you apply 3-D learning design into your lesson plan.

Ass 3.2

Week 7

(Day 48)

Conduct the lesson plan and collect data from students’ work. Reflect and revise your lesson plan based on the students’ work.

Ass 3.3

Week 8

(Day 52)

Finalize your learning design and state the reasons.

Assignment List and Due Dates


Timeline of Activities and Due dates

Module 1

Deliverable

Time

Description

 .

Assignment 1.1

Week 1

(Day 3)

List the most common disengage behaviors in your teaching experience and propose some reasons cause those behaviors.

Ass. 1.2

Week 1

(Day 5)

Submit the work for lab ICE in Alcohol. Explain the engaging level of learning experience compare to your own teaching experience.

Ass. 1.3

Week 2

(Day 8)

Submit your summary for the cause of reluctant behaviors in science classrooms.

Module 2 

Deliverable 

Time

Description

Ass. 2.1

Week 2

(Day 10)

Access the Discussion: How did your strategies work in your class to engage students?

Ass. 2.2

Week 3

(Day 15)

Post your infographic to the discussion to summarize the 3-D learning design strategies and compare those strategies to effective strategies you or your peers have used.

Ass. 2.3

Week 3

(Day 21)

Compare the 3-D learning design strategies and the successful strategies in previous lessons you have read in the case studies. Explain how those strategies are used in the case studies.

Ass. 2.4

Week 4

(Day 28)

Choose strategies you are going to use to design a lesson to engage students in science learning. And state the reasons to show the connections between you targeted behaviors and the strategies you choose.

Module 3

Deliverable 

Milestone

Description

Ass 3.1

Week 5

(Day 35)

Design a lesson to engage all students with the strategies you choose, make sure you apply 3-D learning design into your lesson plan.

Ass 3.2

Week 7

(Day 48)

Conduct the lesson plan and collect data from students’ work. Reflect and revise your lesson plan based on the students’ work.

Ass 3.3

Week 8

(Day 52)

Finalize your learning design and state the reasons.

Module 1--week 1-2: Identify Resistant Behaviors

What is the problem?

First, we will start with our problems here. Please write down most common disengaged behaviors you have experienced in the past with the probable cause(s) for each behavior. Submit it onto google classroom discussion 1.1. Read at least three other peers’ experiences and then give feedback to the reasons of those behaviors.

Let's do an experiment by yourself.

In order to experience the learning as a student, you are going to do an experiment by yourself here first.

Now watch an experiment of adding ice cubes into alcohol. You will need a piece of blank paper to write down your hypothesis for what will happen next and your explanation of it. Take a photo of your paper after you finish it, insert it into google classroom discussion 1.2 with your answer to the questions listed in the next paragraph.

link for this video click link if you can't access video.

Please give the link to your picture and the answers for the following questions:

What do you think about the activity you just did? Do you think your students will be more engaged in the activities like this one? Why or why not? 

The Nature of Science

What is science, really?


Before you get ready to make a change on your lesson planning through this course, here is a video can remind you the nature of science.  Link for The Nature of Science Video The nature of Science --use link if you can't access the video.

What is in the Next Generation Science Standard

The book NGSS For All Students is a great resource that present the real teaching scenario written by science teachers under NGSS (Next Generation Science Standards). Please using the link above to gain the access to the book and read the chapter 6-12 (this link provides the information of this book, you don’t have to buy the book here). 

After reading seven case studies, you will summarize the causes of reluctant behaviors in science classrooms. In your summary, you will need to include the types of causes of reluctant behaviors and connect the behaviors to the corresponding causes. Use the summary you create to analyze the behavior problems you have from your experiences. Identify the causes of the behavior of your students. Submit the summary and the analysis to discussion 1.3 on google classroom to share with your peers. Give feedback to at least three peers.

Module 2--week 3-4: 3-D Learning--Strategies You Can Use

What Is Your Strategy?

Now you have chosen one or two causes of reluctant behaviors in science learning, you are going to learn the strategies that you can apply to limit those behaviors. Before you start, please think about some strategies that you have used before in your classrooms and how effective they were. How did you use it? Did it work? Why did it work and why didn’t it work? List one or two strategies from your own experience that worked and the reasons why it worked to google classroom discussion 2.1 and leave at least three feedback to your peers' answers.

3D Learning Design

3D learning Design

After you read your peers’ experiences of strategies, go back to NGSS For All Students, read the chapter 1-5. Those chapters will help you understand how the new strategies (3-D LD--Three-Dimensional Learning Design) from the seven case studies fit the NGSS. Three dimensions in learning science are:

1. Science and engineering practices.

2. Crosscutting concepts.

3. Science disciplinary core ideas

Here is a section can help you learn 3-D Learning: Open adaptive learning section

Understand 3-D learning Design framework

Is this 3D learning?

3D or Not 3D learning?

Choose "True" if you think the following statements are 3D learning style or "False" if you think they aren't.

  • Students take a quiz about the notes
  • Ask students to take notes from PowerPoint
  • Students try to explain the lab they just did
  • Students ask questions about what they observed.
  • Students draw a picture to explain the reasons of pollution of a pond
  • Students are doing worksheets
  • Students answer the questions posted by the teacher
  • Students observe a natural phenomenon

3D Learning--Science and engineering practices, Crosscutting concepts, Science disciplinary core ideas.


When learning science, engineering practices are kept in mind and action of learners to help them understand the science concepts and DO science.

Link for picture: Engineering Design Process (.PNG)is provided here if the picture is not shown.

This image shows a flow chart of engineering design process. Each step is connected to next step. “Identify the problem” flow to “brainstorm solutions”, to “select a design”, to “build a model or prototype”, to “test and evaluate”, to “optimize the design”, and then back to “build a model or prototype”. Eventually, to “share the solution”


Building Modes

When learning or studying science, building a model is not only used by scientists and engineers, but also by K-12 school students.


By Neethu 123 - Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0, 

link for picture: Science Project Steps (.PNG) is provided here if the picture is not shown.

This image shows the steps of doing science project. Each step flows to the next step. “project definition” flows to “data collection”, to “data analysis”, to “statistics”, to “modelling”, to “deployment”, and last to “model monitoring”.


What are 3D Learning Design Strategies?

Your summary of strategies

And now think about how 3-D LD was applied in the seven case studies from NGSS For All Students. What are some effective outcomes in the case studies? How did teachers in the case studies applied 3-D LD? Compare the strategies from case studies to the ones from you and your peers. In an infographic, summarize strategies based on your own experience and seven case studies you have read. You can use piktochart.com, a free web tool to make your infographic or use other web tools you feel comfortable with. Submit the infographic to your google classroom 2.2 and leave feedback to at least three peers.

What Did You Do Right?

What Did You Do Right?

Once you receive the feedback from you peers, you will revise your infographic and make it ready to use. Now go back to one or two successful lessons you or your peers had before. Use the infographic to analyze the resistant behaviors and the strategies used in the lesson. Make a comment about how the successful strategies you and your peers used before are connected to the 3-D LD strategies in your summary. Post your comment to google classroom 2.3.

What Is Your New Strategies?

What Is Your New Strategies?

As the last task of this module, you need to pick the strategies you believe are most effective to the causes you have chosen from module one. Pick at least two strategies you will apply in your lesson design in the next module. State the reasons that why you choose those strategies and their connections to your targeted causes of reluctant learning behaviors. Submit the strategies you choose and statement of reasoning to google classroom assignment 2.4.  

Module 3--week 5-8: Design Your Own!

Identify 3-D Learning Tasks in the Case Studies.

Identifying 3-D Learning Tasks in the Case studies.

Go back to read one or more case studies in the book NGSS For All Students. Find the learning tasks written in three-color-coded format.


Look at an example of learning design written for using Ice cubes into Alcohol experiment:

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1Oe7nd2IuDjwstnIJ6WB7MyUFChyicBToyrCMfShdKaQ/edit

Identify the following in the design:

DCI

CCC

SEP

Design your own lesson.

Design a learning plan.

The plan will be used for next one or two weeks in your science class. Please state the grade, science standard the plan is related to, and the strategies you are using in this learning plan. Make sure you are using 3-D LD for this plan and identify assessment for your learning outcome. You will conduct this learning plan after revising and collect the assessment as your materials for later discussion. Upload your learning design to google classroom discussion 3.1 . Read learning plans from your group members. Ask at least one question about each learning plan and give feedback to it.

Just do it!

Conduct your lesson plan.

After answering the questions from your group members and reviewing the feedback, revise your learning design based on the feedback from your group and your instructor. Conduct the learning design with your students. Collect the learning outcomes.

Uploading your revised learning design along with your students’ learning outcomes for discussion 3.2 in google classroom. Review group members’ LD and students’ work. Give feedback to your peers.


Your final work!

Your reflection on your learning design.

Read the feedback from your peers and your instructor. Reflect on your LD, make a final adjustment to your LD. Upload your final LD to the google classroom assignment 3.3. Make sure your reflection includes:

1. The similarity and differences in your LD comparing to your peers.

2. The differences between your old LD with your current one.

3. Your finalized learning design.

Glossary

Glossary

3-D Learning

Cited from:

The National Research Council's (NRC) Framework describes a vision of what it means to be proficient in science; it rests on a view of science as both a body of knowledge and an evidence-based, model and theory building enterprise that continually extends, refines, and revises knowledge. It presents three dimensions that will be combined to form each standard:Dimension 1: PracticesDimension 2: Crosscutting ConceptsDimension 3: Disciplinary Core Ideas


Practices: SCIENTIFIC AND ENGINEERING PRACTICES

Cited from:

To cultivate students’ scientific habits of mind, develop their capability to engage in scientific inquiry, and teach them how to reason in a scientific context [12]. 

Crosscutting Concepts: 

Cited from

Concepts that bridge disciplinary boundaries, having explanatory value throughout much of science and engineering.

Disciplinary Core Ideas:

Cited from:

Important concepts as  in four disciplinary areas: physical sciences; life sciences; earth and space sciences; and engineering, technology, and applications of science

Framework : 

Cited from

The framework identifies the key scientific ideas and practices all students should learn by the end of high school. Designed to make science education more closely resemble the way scientists work and think, the framework envisions that students will gradually deepen their understanding of scientific ideas over time by engaging in practices that scientists and engineers actually use. The framework is also designed to be useful for curriculum and assessment designers, teacher educators, and others who work in K-12 science education.