2017 OSHA

Welcome to the Patriots' Path Council 2017 OSHA training!

Do you know which chemicals you work with? Where do you find that info? Take the time now to review the course and you will get the basics of workplace safety.

The four modules are required. Once you complete the four modules, submit your results and you're complete!

Lockout/Tagout

Introduction

Introduction

This training applies to activities such as, but not limited to constructing, installing, setting up, adjusting, inspecting, modifying, and maintaining and/or servicing machines or equipment, and energy sources such as, but not limited to electrical, mechanical, hydraulic, pneumatic, and potential energy from suspended parts (gravity).

Responsibility

Responsibility

The Patriots’ Path Council has the responsibility of maintaining equipment and machinery at your workplace. Some employees have this responsibility as part of their job description, they are “authorized” employees. “Authorized” employees are responsible for lockout/tagout of any broken equipment or equipment while maintenance is being performed. If you do not have equipment repair/maintenance as part of your job, you are not an “authorized” employee. Your responsibility is to report broken equipment to your supervisor.

The employee who locks or tags a machine before performing service or maintenance (the authorized employee) must notify all affected employees (those who work on or in the area of the machine that is being locked/tagged out) before applying lockout and tagout devices.

Authorized Employees

Authorized Employees

Lock or tag each energy control device in a “safe” or “off” position. If a tag is used on equipment capable of being locked out, attach it where the lock would have been attached. The tag must clearly indicate that operating or moving energy isolating devices is prohibited. If the tag cannot be applied directly to the energy-isolating device, it must be located as close as possible to the energy isolating device in a position that will be immediately obvious to anyone attempting to operate the equipment.

Verify that the machine has been isolated from the energy source and has been de-energized.

Before removing the lock or tag, ensure that all nonessential items have been removed and that the machine is operationally intact; check that all employees are safely positioned; and notify all affected employees that these devices have been removed.

Except in emergencies, locks and tags must be removed from each energy source by the employee who applied them.

Tagout devices shall warn against the hazardous conditions that will occur if the machine is energized and include a warning such as DO NOT START or DO NOT OPEN.

Employee Training

Employee Training

All authorized employees must be able to recognize hazardous energy sources, the type and magnitude of energy in the workplace, and the methods of isolating and controlling energy.

All affected employees must understand the purpose and use of the energy control procedures (lockout/tagout)

All employees who are or may be in an area where an energy control procedure may be used must understand the procedure and the fact that attempting to restart of re-energize locked or tagged-out machines is prohibited.

Employees must be aware that a tag is not a physical restraint. They must understand the importance of having only authorized personnel remove tags and of tags being legible and understandable. They must know the durability requirements of tags and be aware of the false sense of security that tagout systems can present.

Any affected employees must be retrained whenever the job, machines, process, or energy control procedure changes. An employee must be retrained when periodic inspection reveals inadequacies in the employee’s knowledge or use of the energy control procedure(s).

The employer must certify that employee training has been accomplished. Certification must include the names of all employees participating and the date of training.

Lockout devices must be substantial enough to prevent removal without the excessive use of force or unusual techniques, while tagout devices must possess a minimum unlocking strength of 50 pounds.

Lockout and tagout devices must identify the employee applying the device.

A Lockout Device is a device that positively prevents a machine from being:

  • Becoming electrically energized
  • Started up
  • Turned on
  • All of the above

The employees that need LO/TO Training are? (check all that apply)

  • Affected Employees
  • Authorized Employees
  • Other employees
Check all that apply

Lockout/Tagout devices must be labeled to identify the specific employees authorized to apply & remove them.

  • True
  • False

Review

Review

The lockout/tagout system has been put in place to prevent injury/harm to employees from equipment/machinery that is potentially dangerous.

Lockout/tagout is performed by an “authorized” employee

Lockout/tagout is only removed by the employee who applied it

Right to Know

Intent

Intent

Establish SDS availability, establish labeling requirements, requires initial and annual training of employees, allow an employee to refuse to work with a hazardous substance if the employer fails to provide the employee with a SDS, or fail to furnish proof of a diligent effort to obtain the SDS.

Essentially, you have the “Right to Know” the hazards of the chemicals you work with and how to protect yourself!

As an employee, you have a right to know about the chemicals/hazards at your workplace.

  • True
  • False

Routes of Entry

Routes of Entry

Inhalation - Breathing in vapors, dust, fumes or mist - Avoid whenever possible, wear the appropriate protective gear

Ingestion - Swallowing of a chemical - Keep separate areas for eating and working - Take the appropriate cleanliness measures (washing hands after chemicals, before eating, etc.)

Absorption - Passing of chemicals through the skin/eyes -  Use protective equipment to prevent chemicals from coming in contact with skin

Protective Equipment

Protective Equipment

Gloves, boots, lab coats, coveralls, jump suit

Splash goggles

Safety glasses

Emergency drench shower and eyewash station

Respirators

Labeling

Labeling 

Type of information the employee would expect to see on the new labels, including the 

Product identifier: how the hazardous chemical is identified. This can be (but is not limited to) the chemical name, code number or batch number. The manufacturer, importer or distributor can decide the appropriate product identifier. The same product identifier must be both on the label and in Section 1 of the SDS (Identification). 

Signal word: used to indicate the relative level of severity of hazard and alert the reader to a potential hazard on the label. There are only two signal words, “Danger” and “Warning.” Within a specific hazard class, “Danger” is used for the more severe hazards and “Warning” is used for the less severe hazards. There will only be one  signal word on the label no matter how many hazards a chemical may have. If one of the hazards warrants a “Danger” signal word and another warrants the signal word “Warning,” then only “Danger” should appear on the label. Pictogram: OSHA’s required pictograms must be in the shape of a square set at a point and include a black hazard symbol on a white background with a red frame sufficiently wide enough to be clearly visible. A square red frame set at a point without a hazard symbol is not a pictogram and is not permitted on the label. OSHA has designated eight pictograms under this standard for application to a hazard category. 

Hazard statement(s): describe the nature of the hazard(s) of a chemical, including, where appropriate, the degree of hazard. For example: “Causes damage to kidneys through prolonged or repeated exposure when absorbed through the skin.” All of the applicable hazard statements must appear on the label. Hazard statements may be combined where appropriate to reduce redundancies and improve readability. The hazard statements are specific to the hazard classification categories, and chemical users should always see the same statement for the same hazards, no matter what the chemical is or who produces it. Precautionary statement(s): means a phrase that describes recommended measures that should be taken to minimize or prevent adverse effects resulting from exposure to a hazardous chemical or improper storage or handling. 

Name, address and phone number of the chemical manufacturer, distributor, or importer

Explosive

 

Unstable explosives 

Explosives, divisions 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4 

Self-reactive substances and mixtures, types A, B 

Organic peroxides, types A, B

Flamable

Flammable gases, category 1

Flammable aerosols, categories 1, 2

Flammable liquids, categories 1, 2, 3

Flammable solids, categories 1, 2

Self-reactive substances and mixtures, types B, C, D, E, F

Pyrophoric liquids, category 1

Pyrophoric solids, category 1

Self-heating substances and mixtures, categories 1, 2

Substances and mixtures, which in contact with water, emit flammable gases, categories 1, 2, 3

Organic peroxides, types B, C, D, E, F

Oxidizer

 

Oxidizing gases, category 1

Oxidizing liquids, categories 1, 2, 3

Oxidizing solids, categories 1, 2, 3

Compressed Gas

Compressed gases

Liquefied gases

Refrigerated liquefied gases

Dissolved gases

Corrosive

Corrosive to metals, category 1

Explosives, divisions 1.5, 1.6

Flammable gases, category 2

Self-reactive substances and mixtures, type G 

Organic peroxides, type G

Skin corrosion, categories 1A, 1B, 1C

Serious eye damage, category 1

 

Toxic

 

Acute toxicity (oral, dermal, inhalation), categories 1, 2, 3

Harmful

Acute toxicity (oral, dermal, inhalation), category 4

Skin irritation, categories 2, 3

Eye irritation, category 2A

Skin sensitization, category 1

Specific target organ toxicity following single exposure, category 3

Respiratory tract irritation

Narcotic effects

Health Hazard

Respiratory sensitization, category 1

Germ cell mutagenicity, categories 1A, 1B, 2

Carcinogenicity, categories 1A, 1B, 2

Reproductive toxicity, categories 1A, 1B, 2

Specific target organ toxicity following single exposure, categories 1, 2

Specific target organ toxicity following repeated exposure, categories 1, 2

Aspiration hazard, categories 1, 2

Environmental

 

Acute hazards to the aquatic environment, category 1

Chronic hazards to the aquatic environment, categories 1, 2

Uses

Uses

How an employee might use the labels in the workplace. For example:

  • Explain how information on the label can be used to ensure proper storage of hazardous chemicals. 
  • Explain how the information on the label might be used to quickly locate information on first aid when needed by employees or emergency personnel. 
  • General understanding of how the elements work together on a label. For example, 
    • Explain that where a chemical has multiple hazards, different pictograms are used to identify the various hazards. The employee should expect to see the appropriate pictogram for the corresponding hazard class. 
    • Explain that when there are similar precautionary statements, the one providing the most protective information will be included on the label.

Which of the following is a signal word on a chemical?

  • CAUTION
  • CAUSTIC
  • HELP POLICE
  • WARNING

Exemptions

Exemptions

Substances bought for personal use or consumption such as foodstuffs, cosmetics and prescriptions are not required to be labeled/listed/accounted for with a SDS

Employer Responsibilities

Employer Responsibilities

Employers have the responsibility:

  • To evaluate chemical hazards in the work place.
  • To create and make available a written hazard communication program.
  • To provide education and training on chemical substance use.
  • To make available in the work area all current SDS’s for the chemicals that employees may be exposed to.
  • To label all hazardous containers.
  • To provide requested copies of SDS’s.
  • To keep records of training, including dates, names, trainers name and description of training

Conclusion

Conclusion

You have the “Right to Know” the hazards of the chemicals you work with and how to protect yourself!

Always read labels and follow the instructions on them, be familiar with the location of SDS, know about the potential hazards of substances in your workplace, stay current with your “Right to Know” training – including the chemicals and hazards you work with.

Working together we can make our workplace as safe as possible.

 Questions – contact Keith Dlugosz

Emergency Procedures

Introduction

Introduction

Despite the best intentions and efforts there will be occasions when emergencies occur at the Boy Scouts of America (BSA), Patriots’ Path Council, Council Service Center, Cedar Knolls, NJ. Types of emergencies could include, fire, medical, civil disturbance, earthquake, or bomb threat. Serious situations could arise necessitating the evacuation of the building.

The effects of potential emergencies need to be controlled by the implementation of emergency preplanning and safety procedures. The purpose of this Emergency Action Plan is to help minimize as much as possible the extent of injuries and property damage resulting from an emergency.

Emergency Coordination

Emergency Coordination

Aides to Physically Disabled Persons

An appropriate number of Aides are designated depending on the number of physically disabled employees  involved. Temporary disabilities such as an ankle sprain need to be considered as significant as permanent disabilities during an emergency. When an alarm sounds, aides assist their assigned person to the nearest exit. Aides need to be prepared to carry the disabled person to the designated assembly area.

Emergency Coordinators

Mike Sass and William Markert are the Emergency Coordinators in our office.


Training

Training

Emergency procedures and responsibilities involved should be reviewed periodically by the Emergency Coordinator with employees.

All employees should receive training in the proper and safe use of portable fire extinguishers.

Reporting and Evacuation

Reporting and Evacuation

When conditions permit, report the emergency to the Emergency Coordinator. The Emergency Coordinator will announce over the phone paging system the need for immediate evacuation AND call the emergency phone number.

When it is not possible to report emergency to the Emergency Coordinator, employee who first observes the emergency shall call the emergency phone number reporting the company name, location and nature of emergency.

Employee will then notify all employees of the emergency and the need to evacuate over the phone paging system. All employees should leave via the exit closest to them. Evacuation shall be conducted in a calm, orderly and business like fashion. A timely evacuation is important but speed is not the answer. A safe evacuation is the better objective.

Once outside, proceed directly to the designated assembly area(s) so a head count can be taken to ensure everyone is safely out.

Please remain in the designated area until notified by a supervisor or designated back-up to return to the workplace.

Alarm Systems and Emergency Numbers

Alarm Systems

In the event of an emergency, employees shall be notified to evacuate through the following alarm system(s):

Phone Paging System 

Word Of Mouth

Emergency Phone Numbers

Emergency phone numbers have been posted at telephones and/or employee bulletin boards throughout our premises. When the telephone is used to place emergency calls, all emergency messages shall have priority.

9-1-1 is the emergency telephone number for all Fire, Medical and Police Emergencies

Employee Training

Employee Training

Employees will receive training on emergency evacuation procedures. Unannounced emergency evacuation drills will also be conducted at least annually to practice evacuation procedures. A critique session will be held after each emergency evacuation drill and actual emergency to identify and correct any weakness or problems that were observed.

Assembly Areas: The corner of Horsehill Road and Saddle Road is our designated assembly area.

Emergency Coordinator will be responsible for performing a headcount of employees at the assembly area.

Medical Emergencies

Medical Emergencies

Do not move the person. If qualified, you may administer first aid.

Dial 9-1-1

Tell them the address and details of incident.

Bomb Threat

Bomb Threat

Although many bomb threats turn out to be hoaxes, the small percentage that are not could have disastrous results. Thus, all bomb threats should be treated as though they are real. If a bomb threat is received over the telephone, the receptionist should:

Obtain as much information as possible from the caller. The receptionist should attempt to find out how many devices are involved and at what time the devices are due to explode.

Fill out the Bomb Threat Checklist (appendix I).

Caution the caller that many innocent people may be injured.

Notify the building’s Emergency Coordinator.

Once a bomb threat has been received, the Emergency Coordinator should:

Announce an evacuation of the building.

Notify local outside agencies such as the police and fire departments.

If a bomb is found, searchers should immediately notify the Emergency Safety Coordinator. They should not touch the bomb. The Emergency Coordinator should:

Notify trained disposal experts.

Alert medical personnel to stand by.

Emergency plans for dealing with bomb threats should not be widely publicized. Only those key persons who are assigned specific duties should be made aware of them.

Bloodborne Pathogens

Introduction and terms

Exposure to Bloodborne Diseases has always been a serious concern in today's society. As a result, OSHA created the "Bloodborne Pathogens" Standard. This law is designed to protect employees from diseases such as Hepatitis B and AIDS.

Let's begin with some terminology:

Blood is defined as Human blood, Human blood components, Products made from human blood.

Bloodborne Pathogens refer to microorganisms present in blood that can cause disease.

Other Potentially Infectious Materials include Human body fluids (semen, amniotic fluid, etc.), Contaminated body materials, Hard to differentiate body fluids, Unfixed human tissue or organs, HIV and HBV cultures, Infected experimental animals.

Contaminated means having potentially infectious materials on an item or surface.

Regulated Waste refers to liquid or semi-liquid blood or other potentially infectious material, contaminated items that would release infectious materials if compressed, items that are caked with dried infectious material, contaminated "sharps", waste containing infectious materials.

Source Individual means an individual whose potentially infectious materials may be a source of exposure.

Universal Precautions means approaching all human blood and other body fluids as if they contain bloodborne pathogens.

Types of pathogens

Types of pathogens

Hepatitis is a liver disease, resulting in inflammation of the liver, and frequently leads to cirrhosis and liver cancer.

Hepatitis A

A liver infection caused by the Hepatitis A virus (HAV). Hepatitis A is highly contagious. It is usually transmitted by the fecal-oral route, either through person-to-person contact or consumption of contaminated food or water. Hepatitis A is a self-limited disease that does not result in chronic infection. More than 80% of adults with Hepatitis A have symptoms but the majority of children do not have symptoms or have an unrecognized infection. Antibodies produced in response to Hepatitis A last for life and protect against reinfection. The best way to prevent Hepatitis A is by getting vaccinated.

Hepatitis B

A liver infection caused by the Hepatitis B virus (HBV). Hepatitis B is transmitted when blood, semen, or another body fluid from a person infected with the Hepatitis B virus enters the body of someone who is not infected. This can happen through sexual contact; sharing needles, syringes, or other drug-injection equipment; or from mother to baby at birth. For some people, hepatitis B is an acute, or short-term, illness but for others, it can become a long-term, chronic infection. Risk for chronic infection is related to age at infection: approximately 90% of infected infants become chronically infected, compared with 2%–6% of adults. Chronic Hepatitis B can lead to serious health issues, like cirrhosis or liver cancer. The best way to prevent Hepatitis B is by getting vaccinated.

Hepatitis C

A liver infection caused by the Hepatitis C virus (HCV). Hepatitis C is a blood-borne virus. Today, most people become infected with the Hepatitis C virus by sharing needles or other equipment to inject drugs. For some people, hepatitis C is a short-term illness but for 70%–85% of people who become infected with Hepatitis C, it becomes a long-term, chronic infection. Chronic Hepatitis C is a serious disease than can result in long-term health problems, even death. The majority of infected persons might not be aware of their infection because they are not clinically ill. There is no vaccine for Hepatitis C. The best way to prevent Hepatitis C is by avoiding behaviors that can spread the disease, especially injecting drugs.

HIV

HIV is a virus spread through certain body fluids that attacks the body’s immune system, specifically the CD4 cells, often called T cells. Over time, HIV can destroy so many of these cells that the body can’t fight off infections and disease. These special cells help the immune system fight off infections. Untreated, HIV reduces the number of CD4 cells (T cells) in the body. This damage to the immune system makes it harder and harder for the body to fight off infections and some other diseases. Opportunistic infections or cancers take advantage of a very weak immune system and signal that the person has AIDS. 

Exposure

Most exposure to bloodborne diseases is "parenteral", occurring through breaks in the skin or breaks in mucous membrane.

Parenteral Exposures include infectious material getting into existing cuts or abrasions, needle sticks, human bites.

Bloodborne Pathogens can enter the body several ways

  • Direct Contact
  • Indirect Contact
  • Airborne Contact
  • Vector Borne Contact

There are several ways to recognize activities involving potential exposure. Seeing biohazard warning labels, knowing which jobs that involve contact with blood or other body fluids, and consulting the list of job classifications and activities in the facility's Exposure Control Plan.

You might expect to encounter bloodborne pathogens in many industrial situations including emptying trash, performing other cleaning duties, and refilling first aid supply cabinets.

There are a number of ways to reduce exposure by using:

  • Universal Precautions.
  • Engineering Controls.
  • Work Practice Controls.
  • Personal Protective Equipment.
  • Appropriate housekeeping practices.

Engineering Controls refer to equipment that can be used to limit exposure, such as using a dustpan and broom to pick up trash and using tongs to pick up contaminated broken glass.

Work Practice Controls are safer ways to perform tasks.

Hand washing is an important work practice control. It must be done immediately after removing gloves and personal protective equipment. It also must be done after contact with blood/other potentially infectious material. Mucous membranes must also be flushed with water after potential exposure situations.

Housekeeping practices are addressed in the regulation, too. All potential exposure areas must be cleaned periodically and written cleaning schedules are required. Equipment and other surfaces must also be decontaminated after contact with potentially infectious materials. Appropriate disinfectants must be used. Protective equipment coverings and bags in waste baskets or other trash containers must be changed if they become contaminated.

Prevention

Prevention

OSHA regards the use of personal protective equipment as one of the most important requirements in the regulation. It must be worn whenever there is a chance of exposure.

Gloves are the most often used protective equipment.  They must be used whenever hand contact is anticipated.  Disposable gloves must be replaced as soon as possible after contamination (they cannot be reused).  Other gloves can be reused if they are decontaminated. All gloves must be discarded if they become cracked, peeled or otherwise damaged.

Masks and eye protection are also important.  They should be worn if fluids can splash or splatter you.

Safety glasses can protect you from direct exposure (side shields should also be used).  Safety goggles provide complete eye area protection.

Face shields protect the entire face.

Pocket and face masks protect the mouth and lip areas. These should be worn whenever eye protection is used.

Clothing can protect much of the body. It should be selected based on the degree and circumstance of exposure.

 Personal protective equipment is available in all work areas.

You can obtain information about the locations where this equipment can be found from your supervisors, if necessary. Employees should also know the procedures for handling protective equipment once it has been used.

 Take off the equipment before leaving the work area. Know where collection and disposal points are located, and use them. Despite being careful, accidents with potentially infectious materials can occur.


Prevention

Prevention

Bloodborne pathogens are dangerous, but exposure can be greatly reduced by using engineering controls, employing good work practices, using personal protective equipment and participating in your facility's free vaccination program. OSHA regards the use of personal protective equipment as one of the most important requirements in the regulation.

Personal Protective Equipment must be worn whenever there is a chance of exposure. Gloves are the most often used protective equipment. They must be used whenever hand contact is anticipated. Disposable gloves must be replaced as soon as possible after contamination (they cannot be reused). All gloves must be discarded if they become cracked, peeled or otherwise damaged.

Masks and eye protection are also important. They should be worn if fluids can splash or splatter you. Safety glasses can protect you from direct exposure (side shields should also be used). Safety goggles provide complete eye area protection. Face shields protect the entire face. Pocket and face masks protect the mouth and lip areas. These should be worn whenever eye protection is used.

Clothing can protect much of the body. It should be selected based on the degree and circumstance of exposure.

Personal protective equipment is available in all work areas. You can obtain information about the locations where this equipment can be found from your supervisors, if necessary.

Gloves

Masks

Goggles

Emergency Steps

Emergency Steps

It's important to know what to do in case of an emergency. The first steps that should be taken are:

Wash any areas of contact with soap and water as quickly as possible.

Contain infectious material using absorbent barriers.

Remove any remaining material with additional absorbent.

Clean the spill area using an approved disinfectant.

Dispose of contaminated materials in approved waste containers.

Discard or recycle contaminated personal protective equipment.

Several people will need to be notified as well.

Supervisors.

Your Safety/Health Department.

An incident report will also need to be completed. This helps your facility provide information about the incident, and helps to determine what needs to be done medically.

A number of steps will be taken for you if you are involved in an exposure incident. Your employer will provide a written description of the incident, the routes of exposure and the identity of the source individual (if known).

Your employer will provide the healthcare professional with information including the type of work that was being done leading up to the exposure. A description of the incident. The results of the source individual's blood test (if it is known). Your relevant medical records.


Post Exposure

Post Exposure

Employees should also know the procedures for handling protective equipment once it has been used.

Take off the equipment before leaving the work area.

Know where collection and disposal points are located, and use them.

Despite being careful, accidents with potentially infectious materials can occur. It's important to know what to do in case of an emergency. The first steps that should be taken are:

Wash any areas of contact with soap and water as quickly as possible.

Contain infectious material using absorbent barriers.

Remove any remaining material with additional absorbent.

Clean the spill area using an approved disinfectant.

Dispose of contaminated materials in approved waste containers.

Discard or recycle contaminated personal protective equipment.

Several people will need to be notified as including your direct supervisor.


Choose the most appropriate answer

Direct contact can occur by , but not by .

Match the terms with the appropriate definitions

  • Direct Contact
    Touching blood or body fluids
  • Indirect Contact
    Touching blood soaked or soiled clothing
  • Airborne Contact
    Exposure through sneezing or coughing
  • Vectorborne Contact
    Exposure through insects/animals

You can reduce your chance of exposure by doing which of the following?

  • Directly touching blood or other body fluids
  • Wearing personal protective equipment
  • Always treating an ill/injured person before taking universal precautions

Handwashing is an important part of work practice control.

  • True
  • False

OSHA regards the use of personal protective equipment as one of the most important requirements in the regulation.

  • True
  • False

All of the following are examples of personal protective equipment except:

  • Goggles
  • Work/Leather Gloves
  • Masks/Face Shield

Buddy List

2016 Buddy List

2016 OSHA Buddy List


Adams, Will                               Maratea, Marc

Capen, Bridget                         Dorn, John

Capen, Mary Lynne                VanCarpels, Cindy

Cristofich, Adam                     Capen, Mary Lynne

Dadaian, Carol                         Zinky, William

Dorn, John                                Capen, Bridget

Gonnella, Joseph                    Volz, Jennifer

Hemenetz, George                 Thomas, Al

Joiner, Andrew                         Neyman, Wayne

Kohl, Dennis                             Schwartz, Amy

Lobdell, Art                               Wellech, Michael

Luciani, Anthony                   Capen, Mary Lynne

Macaluso, Scott                      Turdiu, Rigel

Mahon, Charlene                   SanFilippo, Billy

Maratea, Marc                         Adams, Will

Markert, William                    Sass, Mike

Mellars, Barbara                     Porter, Camilla

Miller-Porter, Beth                Spaldo, Mark

Morris, Bob                             Wickham, Debbie

Neyman, Wayne                    Joiner, Andrew

Porter, Camilla                      Mellars, Barbara

SanFilippo, Billy                    Mahon, Charlene

Sass, Mike                                Markert, William

Schwartz, Amy                       Kohl, Dennis

Sonzogni, Brenda                 Verdeflor, Natalie

Spaldo, Mark                          Miller-Porter, Beth

Thomas, Al                              Hemenetz, George

Treubig, Gary                         Capen, Mary Lynne

Turdiu, Rigel                          Macaluso, Scott

VanCarpels, Cindy              Capen, Mary Lynne

Verdeflor, Natalie                 Sonzogni, Brenda

Volz, Jennifer                        Gonnella, Joseph

Wellech, Michael                Lobdell, Art

Wickham, Debbie               Morris, Bob

Zinky, William                      Dadaian, Carol