Field View - Project Administrator Training

Welcome to the Field View Project Administrator Training Course.

This course will walk you through using Field View to:

This course covers all functionality that is available - so remember, you may not be using some functions on your project.

Field View - Project Administrator Exam

Once you have finished the reading material you can take an Exam to validate your learning. The exam covers all the topics in the reading material and will produce a random set of 80 questions - 60 of which must be answered correctly to pass (75%).

The Exam is Open Book - your reading material will be available to you in a separate tab and we would encourage you to refer to it during the exam. Remember - we want you to be able to use  Field  View  effectively and to use the Training  Material as a guide and reminder of how to do things.

The exam is timed - you have 1 1/2 hours to complete it - and you can only take it once.  So please make sure that when you take the exam you have set aside some dedicated time.

Core Knowledge : Setting Up a Project in Field View - Getting Started

Administrator Roles in Field View. What is a Business Administrator?

Business Administrators

A Business Administrator is responsible for configuration decisions for multiple projects across a business. They setup workflows and templates that will form standards for your company, create Forms, Devices and Users and act as a decision maker for Field View in your business.

The Business Administrator role should ideally be taken by someone different to the Project Administrator but for a small project - or when Field View is new to a business - the Business Administrator role and the Project Administrator role may be combined and covered by one person.

As your business uses Field View more and more we would recommend that you split the Business Administrator and Project Administrator roles to be separate people. This will help determine what work each person should be doing.

Roles and Responsibilities

Business Administrators create new things for use on multiple projects – they don’t assign them to projects. They create new things like users, tasks, forms, devices etc at the Business level for Project Administrators to assign to their projects.

Business Administrators do not configure single projects - i.e. setup Geometry and Drawings, run daily reports etc.

Administrator Roles in Field View. What is a Project Administrator?

Project Administrators

A Project Administrator is responsible for configuring and maintenance of one or more projects. They setup and configure the drawings that you will use to snag on and raise forms and they manage Users and Subcontractors on a project.

Roles and Responsibilities

Project Administrators assign things to a project – they don’t create them. They select from a pool of created items (users, tasks, forms, devices etc) and assign them onto their projects.

Project Administrators will should also be managing day-to-day tasks for a project - for example:

  • Updating Subcontractor details as required
  • Helping to produce reports from the Field View website.
  • Updating drawings as required.
  • Adding new areas to a project as required.

Administrator Roles in Field View. How much administration does a Field View Project need?

Administrators and Field View

Sometimes a Project may not need a full Project Administrator – this is usually for smaller projects where the configuration (i.e. the drawings and the locations on your site) are unlikely to change over the remaining length of the project.

As a minimum each project should have someone who will be responsible for managing Users and Subcontractors as they will need to:

  • make changes to email addresses, 
  • add new subcontractors 
  • manage user requests. (forgotten password etc) 

This person should also be familiar with the reporting functions of Field View on the web to be able to help other users get to the information that they need such as:

  • Producing a snagging list for a particular subcontractor
  • Producing a report of outstanding work for weekly meetings

Minimum requirements

Every project – no matter what size – must have a Field View Expert User to be able to effectively manage their day-to-day use of Field View. Expert Users will have been trained as part of the General User training session.

An Expert User should expect to spend around an hour a day maintaining their Field View project and wouldn't be required to setup additional locations or revise drawings.

Ideal requirements

Ideally each project will have a full Project Administrator. This will allow a project to make full use of their Field View installation as well as allowing each project to not only maintain their system but to expand and change as required. For example:

  • Revise and update drawings where needed.
  • Add new locations to a project.

A Project Administrator should expect to spend around an hour a day maintaining their Field View project with greater time on-demand needed for setting up new parts of a project.

Definitions - Standard Field View Roles

  • Project Editor. Project Editor’s are the main users of Field View and will normally by out on site using the tablets - but can manage and track work from the office as well using a laptop or PC. Project Editors in Field View can do most things except configure projects and delete things. The can add, edit and manage Tasks (Snags) and Forms for their Project. 
  • Project Administrator. Project Administrators setup and configure Projects in Field View as well as maintain and update them. Project Administrators will usually be using the Field View website rather than the tablets. 
  • Business Administrator. Business Administrators are the Superusers of Field View. They take decisions about how Field View should be set up for your business rather than setup projects and will usually be using the Field View website.

What do the different Roles in Field View do?

Business Administrators

A Business Administrator is responsible for configuration decisions for multiple projects across a business. They setup workflows and templates that will form standards for your company, create Forms, Devices and Users and act as a decision maker for Field View in your business.

Project Administrators

Project Administrators add things to a project. They select from a pool of created items (users, tasks, forms, devices etc) and add them onto their projects.

Project Administrators will should also be managing day-to-day tasks for a project such as updating Subcontractor details as required, Helping to produce reports from the Field View website, updating drawings as required and adding new areas to a project as required.

.

Project Editors

Project Editor’s are the main users of Field View and will normally by out on site using the tablets - but can manage and track work from the office as well using a laptop or PC. Project Editors in Field View can do most things except configure projects and delete things. The can add, edit and manage Tasks (Snags) and Forms for their Project. 

Match the correct action to the appropriate Role.

  • Business Administrators
    Create things
  • Project Administrators
    Assign things
  • Project Editors
    Raise things

Core Knowledge : Field View on the Web

Introducing the Field View Website - www.viewpoint.com

Introducing the Field View website

Where Field View Users will mainly use the tablet to perform their role – administrators will mainly use the Field View website.

Field View can be accessed through the main Viewpoint website at www.viewpoint.com. Make sure you’ve set your region correctly and then click on the Login button.

Our aim is for everyone to access their Viewpoint software using one login and password (Single Sign On) – a feature which is currently under development.

Introducing the Field View Website - www.priority1.uk.net

Field View Website

Clicking on the Field View option will bring you to the Field View login page.

You can see here that this is still under our old website address of:

www.priority1.uk.net

You can bookmark this page for quick access for now to save a few additional clicks to get here.

Introducing the Field View Website - New Web

Field View - New Web

We are currently upgrading the Field View website to a new “look and feel” – so when you log in you will see two versions of the website.

New Web looks like this. It has a modern, streamlined interface which will form a “standard” for how Viewpoint products look.

Currently only User functions have been moved– that is reporting functions for Tasks, Forms, Processes and Assets – but these functions now have upgraded capabilities compared to the older versions.

Introducing the Field View Website - Classic Web

Classic Field View

Clicking on the Field View Classic link on the New Web will take you to the older version of our website – and this is where you will currently find all the Administrator functions.

Different parts of the website will be converted to the new version over the coming months. We are doing this step by step to make sure that we don’t introduce too much change at once.

It also gives us the opportunity to review functionality on the website to see if we can make it better.

Introducing the Field View Website - How your Role affects the website

How your Role affects the Field View website

The Field View website consists of two main types of menu and some supplementary menus (like the Help menu). What menu’s you can see (and what you can see in them) is controlled by your User Role. As a general rule: 

  • Business Administrators can see all options in all menus. 
  • Project Administrators can see most options in most menus. 
  • Project Editors can see some options in some menus. 
  • Subcontractors can see the least options in the least menus.

Reporting Menus

There are four reporting menus in Field View – Tasks, Forms, Assets and Process.

Each of these menus allows you to view information about items created on your Project and create printable reports as well as giving you the ability to add information to your Tasks and Forms on the website.

  • Business Administrators and Project Administrators can use all functions in these menus – including deleting items. 
  • Project Editors can use all functions in these menus – apart from deleting items 
  • Subcontractors can use most functions in these menus – they will only see items that have been assigned to them

Configuration Menus

There are two configuration menus in Field View – Project Setup and Business Setup

These menus allow you to setup the information needed for a project, allow you to manage day-to-day configuration for a project and setup templates and business-wide items for your company.

  • Business Administrators can see both these menus use all the functions. 
  • Project Administrators can see both menus but can only use some functions in the Business Setup menu. 
  • Project Editors and Subcontractors can see the Project Setup menu but can only use some functions in it.

The Analyse Menu

The Analyse menu is primarily a Business Administrator menu although it can be granted to other Roles.

This menu allows you to collate Task and Form information across multiple projects into one place for export and analysis. Remember – Field View is not a Business Intelligence tool. Generating graphs, dashboards or Insight information needs to be done externally to Field View.

  • Business Administrators can see this menu by default 
  • Project Administrators and Project Editors can be granted permissions to see this menu. 
  • Subcontractors will not have access to this menu.

My Field View Menu

The My Field View menu is available to all users and contains mostly the same options for everyone.

The My Field View menu allows you to access your personal details, change your password and, for Project Administrators, allows you to enter your Viewpoint for Projects details to download drawings directly from your VfP Enterprise when setting up your project.

Help Menu

The Help menus are available to all users and contains the same options for everyone.

The Help menu allows you to contact our Support Team, look up information and guides on our Wiki page and allows you to make Suggestions for new features or improvements to current ones.

More Menu

The More menu is primarily used for logging off but also contains some additional functions for Business Administrators and Project Administrators.

This menu allows you to access the System lists of Causes, Organisations, Organisation Types and Project Types.

  • Business Administrators can see all items in this menu 
  • Project Administrators can see Causes and Organisations only. 
  • Project Editors and Subcontractors can only see the Logout option.

Administrators should take care with these menus as they are System wide – i.e. will be available to all users of Field View.

Introducing the Field View Website - How changes on the website affect the Tablet

How changes on the website affect the tablet.

When you change something on the website it will update immediately and be available to view. Remember, however, that changes will not be visible on Tablets until they are synced.

Common examples of this are:

  • New drawings / locations added. 
  • New Users added to a Project.

As a Project Administrator you should be encouraging your Users to sync their tablets regularly to make sure that they have the latest information available to them.

Introducing the Field View Website - The Login Screen

The Login Screen

As an administrator you will be using the Field View website to:

  • Configure your project 
  • Manage your subcontractors 
  • Manage your users 
  • Produce reports

You can also view statistics about your Project, edit and add information to your Tasks and Forms and change the status of your Tasks and Forms directly from the website.

To access the Field View website go to:

www.priority1.uk.net

The login screen will be the first screen that you see. As well as fields to enter your User Name and Password you can see Viewpoint news and information, check the service status of Field View and reset your User Name or Password if you have forgotten them.

Your User Name and Password will be issued to you by your Business Administrator. It is the same password that you used to login on the tablet.

Field View Service Status

Clicking the link to the Field View service status will show you whether there are any knows issues with the Field View website or application.

You can also subscribe to information from this page so that you will get alerts if any problems occur.

Scrolling down the page will also display information about any planned maintenance to our system.

Introducing the Field View Website - The Login Screen - Reset Your Password

Resetting your Password

If you forget your Field View password you can easily reset it by clicking on the Forgotten Password link on the login screen.

This will open the Reset Password screen.

To reset your Password you will need your Field View username. Enter your User Name and an email will be sent to the email address registered to your User Name with a new password.

Remember – the new password will not be active on your tablet until you synchronise the device.

Introducing the Field View Website - The Login Screen - Reset Your Username

Resetting your Username

If you can’t remember your User Name then you can get this emailed to you by clicking the Forgotten User Name link from the login screen or the Forgot your username link from the Reset Your Password screen.

To get your User Name sent to you enter the email address associated with your Field View account. You will then be sent an email containing your User Name.

If you have also forgotten your password you can then use your User Name to reset your password.

Introducing the Field View Website - The Login Screen - Logging In

Logging In

To access the Field View website enter your User Name and Password on the login screen and then click the Log In button.

You will then be taken to the Dashboard page for your Project in New Web.

What website do I use to log into Field View?

You can currently access the Field View website directly by going to . You can also access the Field View website by going to the Viewpoint website at  and clicking on the Login button at the top of the page.

Viewpoint are moving to a single-sign on login (one username and password for all Viewpoint services) so in future you will probably access Field View through the  website only.

What's the difference between New Field View and Classic Field View?

  • New Field View
    contains reporting menus and is mainly used by Field Users to view and manage Tasks and Forms that they've raised on a Project.
  • Classic Field View
    contains reporting and administration menus and is mainly used by Administrators to create and configure information on projects.

What menu options can different Roles see?

  • Reporting Menus. Tasks, Forms, Assets and Processes
    Subcontractors can see all menus but only items that have been assigned to them.
  • Business Setup and Project Setup Menus
    Business Administrators can see both menus and see all items.
  • Analyse Menu
    Business Administrators can see this by default - but it can be granted to Project Administrators to.
  • My Field View Menu
    Available to all users and contains mostly the same options for everyone.
  • Help Menu
    Available to all users and contains the same options for everyone.
  • More Menu
    Available to all users but contains additional functions for Business Administrators and Project Administrators.

What information do you need to reset your Password?

Pick one answer only

  • Your email address
  • Your password
  • Your Field View PIN
  • Your User Name

What information do you need to reset your User Name?

Pick one answer only

  • Your email address
  • Your password
  • Your Field View PIN
  • Your User Name

Core Knowledge : Learning where everything is

Learn the product - not the website

Learn the product, not the website

Field View is a very flexible product and can be configured in lots of different ways. The website has 4 reporting menus, 2 administration menus, 1 analysis menu and 3 miscellaneous menus. This makes for a lot of things to click !

Because of it’s flexibility it’s important that you understand how to use Field View – that you understand the general principles of why we do things so that you can apply them to any project that you come across.

What we will be doing in this training is concentrating less on what you need to click on and more on the “why”. Learning where each menu option is will come with practice - your "muscle memory" will improve the more you use Field View.

We will try to condense everything that you do in Field View down to two basic options:

  • The only menu option that you need to remember is Project Setup ? Locations and Assets > Locations and Assets - Drawing Calibration.
  • To access a menu option to do something - try right-clicking on it.

We'll see more on these simple rules a little later.

We will look at some example projects to see standard configuration options that you can then use as a basis for your own projects as well as some rules and conventions that will make setting up projects a little easier.

We will also look at the background information that you need to assign to your project to make it work and how you can set this up to make things faster for your Users.

What is the best way to learn Field View?

It's important to understand how to  Field View rather than remembering all the different menus and that you understand  we do things - so that you can apply this to any project that you come across.

 

What is the main menu option that you need to remember?

To get to the main menu option that you need to remember you need to click on  followed by  followed by 

What is the quickest way to access menu options in Classic Field View?

Pick one answer

  • Click on one of the menu options at the top
  • Right-click on things
  • Select the Overflow Menu

Core Knowledge : Setting Up A Project in Field View - Step 1. Adding Locations

Setting Up a Project in Field View - Step 1.

Setting Up a Project In Field View - Step 1. Locations

Although there's no "best way" to set up a Field View project there are certain things that can be considered "mandatory" - i.e. you will need to complete these items to ensure that you project functions correctly.

To get a list of these items we're going to use the Project Setup > Locations and Assets > Locations And Assets - Drawing Calibration menu.

Mandatory Items

On the left hand side of the Locations and Assets - Drawing Calibration page is a tree structure showing you all the information and items that are contained in your project.

We are going to use this as a guide to what we need to complete.

All items from Locations and Assets down to Devices should be considered mandatory.

  • You need Locations on your project to have somewhere to raise Tasks and Forms.
  • You need Packages and Organisations (Subcontractors) to have someone to raise Tasks and Forms to.
  • You need Users so that you have someone to raise Tasks and Forms.
  • You need Task Types, Causes and Library Tasks to help you populate Task information quickly.
  • And you need Devices if you want to be able to raise Tasks and Forms in the Field.

Once you have completed these items your project is ready to go. 

In this step we are going to look at Locations and Assets.

Non Mandatory Items

All items from Form Templates to Processes can be considered Non Mandatory. They are nice to have on your project - but you don't need to have them to be able to use your Project.

What are the Mandatory and Non Mandatory items needed when creating a Project?

  • Locations and Assets are a
    mandatory item
  • Form Templates are a
    non mandatory item
  • Task Types are a
    mandatory item
  • Users are a
    mandatory item
  • Processes are a
    non mandatory item
  • Packages and Organisations are a
    mandatory item
  • Causes are a
    mandatory item
  • Library Tasks are a
    mandatory item
  • Communication Plan is a
    non mandatory item
  • Devices are a
    mandatory item

Core Knowledge: Drawings, Locations and Calibrations

Definitions

  • Location. A location is a unique part of your project. This could be a Room, a Floor, a riser – any physical area of your project can be represented by a Location. 
  • Calibration. A calibration tells Field View which part of the drawing represents a particular location in the Geometry. You can have one calibration per location. 
  • Drawings. Drawings in Field View are basically a map of your project. You won’t be using them to help you build things correctly – just to identify where you are in the project.

Finding your way around the website quickly

What menu should I look in?

We’re going to use a simple rule to help you decide what menu option to look in to find what you need to do.

Remember from our Administrator definitions earlier:

  • Business Admin’s create things 
  • Project Admin’s assign things. 

Functions that a Business Administrator should use can be found in the Business Setup menu. So it follows that if you want to create something – you can do this in Business Setup menu

Business Administrators

Functions that a Business Administrator needs are found in the Business Setup menu. Here you can:

  • Create new Users 
  • Create new Devices 
  • Create Form Templates 
  • Etc 

Remember – Business Administrators create things. So if you need a new “something” then the menu option that you need is most likely to be found in the Business Setup menu.

In the same way functions that a Project Administrator should use can be found in the Project Setup menu. Project Administrators setup and configure items specifically for their projects – so here we can find:

  • Adding, Configuring and updating drawings. 
  • Managing Subcontractors 
  • Adding things to your project 
  • Setting up and managing Users on your project. 

Project Administrators assign things to their projects - so it follows that if you want to assign something – you can do this in Project Setup menu

Project Administrators

Functions that a Project Administrator needs are found in the Project Setup menu. Here you can:

  • Assign new Users to your project 
  • Setup and manage your Subcontractors 
  • Assign Form Templates to your project 
  • Etc 

Remember – Project Administrators assign things. So if you need to add “something” to your project then the menu option that you need is most likely to be found in the Project Setup menu.

Project Geometry

Project Geometry

The next pane shows you your Project Geometry – this is a text based breakdown of your project in a tree structure. Starting at the top of the project and then going into finer and finer detail.

This geometry structure will be unique to your project and will almost certainly vary from project to project – even on similar projects.

Primary Skill

Learning how to think your way around project geometries is the main skill involved in being a Project Administrator.


Project Geometry as a Reporting Tool

Project Geometry as a Reporting Tool

As well as describing your project’s physical structure the project Geometry is also a reporting tool. Reports can be filtered by Location – so the detail that you put into your Geometry will control the detail that you can then report on.

In our residential example if I only need to report on “how many snags I have in my apartments” then the lowest level of Geometry needs to be the apartment number.

If I need to report on “how many snags do I have in my bathrooms” then the lowest level of Geometry needs to include Bathrooms.

Geometry Best Practice

Field View is a location-based snagging tool and, as such, works best when you set it up this way. Being a flexible system however means that you can use different configuration methods – for example Systems (e.g. M&E) or Multiple sites per project.

Caution should be exercised when considering setting up a project in Field View in a non-standard way. As a general rule of thumb any configuration that is not location-based will mean that you have to make a compromise. You should make sure that you understand what the compromise is and decide whether you are prepared to accept the compromise.

If you are unsure– contact Field View before setting up the project as it is generally very difficult to undo and reset configurations on this kind of project.

Project Geometry - different configurations for different locations.

Using different Geometry configurations

Different areas of your Project can be configured in different ways and you can have different branches of your Geometry for different parts or even phases of your project.

In our residential example the configuration that we decide on for internal Fit Out is not going to make sense to someone snagging the foundations. So you might need two “branches” to your project – one for Fit Out (and configured one way) and one for Substructure (configured another way)

Remember – there is no right or wrong way to setup geometry. Only what makes sense for your project.

Geometry decisions

Ultimately the decider of whether project Geometry makes sense or not should be your site team. If what they are looking at on the tablet screen doesn’t make sense then they will be less likely to use the tablets.

In our residential example we can see that after Level 01 we choose between Apartments or Communal areas. If your site Teams are, however, working to Zones or Clusters and this isn’t included in your geometry then it might not make sense to them.

The decisions you make here will need to be a balance between your Users requirements and your Companies reporting requirements.

Project Geometry - Things to Remember

Project Geometry - Things to remember

Project Geometry splits your project area into smaller and smaller areas in a hierarchical (tree) structure.

The lowest level of this structure will define the highest level of reporting detail that you need for your project.

As a Project Administrator you should guide your site teams to make geometry configuration decisions that will make Field View work for them – remembering to take their requirements into consideration.

Remember your Best Practice information for non-standard geometry configurations. Field View is designed to work and work well a certain way. It’s flexibility allows you to step outside this but doing so will inevitably mean you have to make a compromise.

Project Examples - Residential Projects

Residential Projects

Residential projects come in all sorts of flavours. The most common you will see in Field View are:

  • Plots of Houses. (a new housing estate for example) 
  • 1 tower block 
  • Many tower blocks

Each of these will be configured in similar ways – but each will have their own variations depending on size and layout.

Project Examples - Residential Projects - Plots

Residential Projects - Plots

Projects like this are usually structured by Plot Number and each Plot will usually have a Type.

Each plot type will have it’s own set of drawings – GAs for the internal floor plans and some elevation drawings (usually Front, Back and sides)

This means that you will use one set of drawings in multiple locations on this type of project as Plots 3-4,15,24-28 and 30 may all be Type A1 plots – and they will all use the one set of drawings.

Residential Projects - Plots - Geometry Structure

Plots tend to have a smaller amount of internal locations compared to other projects so we will usually put every location into the geometry tree.

So the internal geometry structure will have a folder for each floor and each floor will have every location listed.

Very occasionally you will see balconies or terraces in these types of projects. Although, technically speaking, they are outside the building as they appear on the internal GA they are usually set up as part of the internal structure.

Plots - typical configuration

Here’s what a typical Plot configuration looks like.

We have two plots side by side and on the selected plot we can see the each area is distinctly marked out (in this example we have selected the Living Room)

Plots - Question to Ask

When thinking about how to set up a project that involves Plots there are a few questions that you need to ask to help you understand how to set up the Geometry. 

  • How many Plots are in this development? 
  • Are the Plots organized into any type of grouping? 
  • Are there Plot Types? 
  • Does each Plot Type have it’s own drawing? 
  • Elevation drawings are usually Front and Back – should there be one calibration per floor or one calibration covering the whole of the elevation? 
  • Is a Site Drawing needed?

Project Examples - Residential Projects - Apartment Block

Residential Projects - Apartment Blocks

For a single apartment block we use a standard geometry configuration to help site teams work out which area they need to select. This is:

  • Internals. Everything inside the building 
  • Externals. Everything outside the building 
  • Elevations. The sides of the building. 

There will be some things that you need to check with the site team – for example if there is a Roof drawing should this go in Internals or Externals?

Most apartment blocks that you set up will follow this configuration.

Residential Projects - Apartment Blocks - Geometry Structure

The Internals folder is then split into floors – check with your site team as some will refer to them as Levels (e.g. Level 00) some will refer to them as Floors (e.g. Ground Floor). Make sure that you use terminology that your site recognizes.

The Externals folder will usually contain a Roof drawing and also a Site Plan.

The Elevations folder will be broken down into each distinct elevation sheet. For a square building this will usually be a variant on N-S-E-W but there could be more – depending on the shape of the building.

For each floor we try to make it easier for the site team to quickly select the location that they are working at. Your general rule should be:

  • Use the minimum amount of clicks to do something 

However some buildings have 20-30 apartments on each floor – that’s before you include stairs, lifts, corridors etc. So just having those as a list inside the Floor container will mean that you have to do a lot of scrolling to find what you need.

To make this easier we split each floor into Apartments and Communal.

  • Apartments. These are the individual rooms in your project. Different projects may call them different things – Apartments, Flats, Rooms, Plots etc but what ever they are called we mean a residential area. 
  • Communal. Communal areas are the “other” parts of the project i.e. non-residential locations. These can be corridors, risers, stairs etc.

Geometry - Further Detail

In the Apartments folder each apartment is listed separately so that you can find them quickly.

We then come to one of the primary configuration choices for apartment blocks. The level of detail that we need in the geometry for each apartment.

Remember our geometry structure is also a reporting tool so the more detail that we build in here the more detail you can report on.

Let’s look at the three standard apartment configurations that we use.

All Locations Apartment Geometry

In this example we have included every location within the apartment as distinct areas. This is the highest level of detail that you can put in the geometry.

This type of configuration is useful for when you want to report like this:

  • I need to see all of the Snags in by Bathrooms across the project.

As individual bathrooms are included in the geometry you can filter your project by Bathrooms to run reports.

All Locations - Plan View

Here’s what this would look like on a project. We can see that each area is distinctly marked out (in this example we’ve selected the Kitchen)

Partial Locations Apartment Geometry

In this example we have included any areas where Snags are most likely to occur – in apartments this will be areas that have M&E Services such as Bathrooms and Kitchens. For this configuration we will include:

  •  All bathrooms separately (including En Suites)
  •  The kitchen separately 
  • All other locations are counted as one. (We call this Apartment General) 

This is a nice middle ground and allows you to have detailed reports on areas with the most snags without having to set up all the detail for every location in the apartment.

Partial Location - Plan View

Here’s what this would look like on a project. In this example we have an apartment split into two bedrooms and then everything else. The red, selected area is the Apartment General location in the geometry.

Whole Apartment Geometry

The third configuration option is a Whole Apartment geometry. This is where we do not split the apartment down into it’s individual locations.

This is useful if you want to report as follows:

  • I just need to know how many snags are in my apartments. I’ll look on the plan to find out exactly where they are. 

This is the most time-effective configuration as with less geometry to setup you can create the geometry structure quickly.

Whole Apartment - Plan View

Here we can see what this looks like on a project. In this case there are no individual rooms marked out – just the whole apartment.

Questions to Ask

When thinking about how to set up a project that involves Apartment Blocks there are a few questions that you need to ask to help you understand how to set up the Geometry. 

  • How many Blocks are in this development? 
  • What do the drawings look like? Is it one floor per block to a drawing or is it one floor for more than one block per drawing? 
  • What level of detail does the project need for its reporting? Whole Apartment? Completely Split?
  • Elevation drawings. Should there be one calibration per floor? One calibration per two floors?

Project Examples - Residential Projects - Student Accommodation

Residential Projects - Student Accommodation

Finally we have Student Accommodation type residential projects.

Typically Student Accommodation will be buildings that contain a large number of individual apartments (so Whole Apartment geometry).

Student Accommodation projects can include some different grouping to a floor – so rooms may be organized into Clusters. This will usually be indicated by the room reference number (e.g. 12/1 is room 1, cluster 12)

You should always check with the site team to make sure that the geometry reflects how they’re snagging on site.

Student Accommodation - Plan View

Here we can see what this looks like on a project. Here we can see that each individual room is calibrated and organised into a cluster.

Different terminology for this can be used on different projects. Cluster, Zone, etc.

Project Examples - Hotel Project

Hotel Project

Hotel projects tend to look the same – no matter what hotel they are.

Generally a hotel will consist of 1 or 2 floors of general rooms (imagine the ground floor with a reception area, a restaurant, etc) followed by many floors of rooms.

Some hotels will have the same layout on each floor, just different room numbers. This can allow us to use the Clone facility to quickly create large numbers of floors.

Let’s have a look at a typical Hotel project.

Hotel Project - Ground Floor Geometry

The Ground floor will usually consist of Communal areas – the reception, retail units, restaurants etc. while the upper floors will consist of the hotel rooms.

Hotel Project - First Floor Geometry

Typically Hotels will be buildings that contain a large number of individual rooms (so Whole Apartment geometry).

Depending on the size of the hotel it could be split into wings or zones.

Hotel Project - Plan View

Here we can see what this looks like on a project.

Large hotels can sometimes contain a huge number of rooms to calibrate. In this case we have been fortunate as most of the rooms on the floor are square – meaning we can use the square calibration tool to go around them quickly.

Hotels do have one distinguishing feature that can make calibration a little slower. Let’s have a look at this

Hotel Risers

We’ve all been to a hotel – so picture yourself walking down the corridor to your room. As you pass each door there’s a cupboard on the wall in between each room.

These are the risers that pass between floors and this has the effect of making the room not square (as you can see in the picture opposite).

This will slow down the calibration of the project as you will need to use the Polygon tool to go around each riser.

Questions to Ask

When thinking about how to set up a project that involves a Hotel there are a few questions that you need to ask to help you understand how to set up the Geometry. 

  • How many floors are in the hotel? 
  • Is there one drawing for each floor or does one drawing cover many floors? 
  • Are there any Zones or Wings? 
  • Elevation drawings – should there be one calibration per floor or one calibration covering the whole of the elevation?

Project Examples - Hospital Project

Hospital Project

Hospital projects tend to be unique – based on the type of hospital that it is.

Generally a hospital will consist of a small number floors organized into areas (for example A&E, Beds, X-Ray etc) but overall hospitals tend to have a far larger number of rooms than other projects. This means that they tend to take a little longer to set up.

Let’s have a look at a typical Hospital project

Hospital Project - Geometry

Typically Hospitals will be buildings that contain a large number of individual rooms – generally organised by Room Numbers.

Depending on the hospital you may see specific areas in the project (such as A&E Department, X-Ray Department) which may need to be taken into consideration when you set up the project geometry.

Hospital Project - Plan View

Here we can see the typical scale of a hospital project – small number of floors (2 for this particular project) but lots of rooms (160 on this floor alone)

Just like hotels – hospitals can take a little longer to setup due to the large number of locations involved.

Questions to Ask

When thinking about how to set up a project that involves a Hospital there are a few questions that you need to ask to help you understand how to set up the Geometry. 

  • How many floors are in the hospital? 
  • Is there one drawing for each floor or more than one drawing per floor? 
  • Are there any Zones or Wings? 
  • Elevation drawings – should there be one calibration per floor or one calibration covering the whole of the elevation?

Project Examples - School Project

School Project

School projects tend to broadly fall between two categories:

  • Primary and Secondary Schools 
  • Colleges and Universities

Primary and Secondary schools tend to be smaller buildings with smaller number of floors (typically 2).

Colleges tend to be a bit bigger (in terms of overall locations) but roughly the same in terms of floors. While University projects are the largest and can contain multiple buildings.

Primary School - Geometry

Typically Primary Schools will be buildings that contain a small number of individual rooms – and are usually grouped by discipline (you’ll see all the KS1 rooms together – for example)

Primary School rooms tend to be square – which makes them easier to calibrate as you can use the Square tool to quickly complete them.

Primary School - Plan View

Here we can see a typical Primary School project – small number of floors (2 for this particular project) and large, square rooms … which make them easier to calibrate.

On this drawing we can see a particular feature of education-type buildings is that disciplines are colour coded. Here we can see that KS1 and KS2 classrooms are coloured orange.

Unless there’s a specific reason for doing so we will leave the drawings as the coloured version. More on this later.

Secondary School - Geometry

Just like Primary Schools room are usually grouped into disciplines and are identified by unique room identifiers.

Secondary School rooms tend to be square – which makes them easier to calibrate as you can use the Square tool to quickly complete them.

Secondary School - Plan View

Here we can see a typical Secondary School project – more floors (4 for this particular project) and more rooms but still large, square rooms … which make them easier to calibrate.

This is a modern, new build project in which rooms are arranged in a horse-shoe shape around the central core.

College - Geometry

Just like before College room are usually grouped into disciplines and are identified by unique room identifiers.

The structure of the building is usually more complicated – which makes them a little longer to calibrate as you can’t use the Square tool to quickly complete them.

College - Plan View

Here we can see a typical College project – 4 or 5 floors and more rooms (around 120 per floor) but now the structure of the building is a little more complicated … which make them longer to calibrate.

This is a modern, new build project hence it’s non-traditional shape.

University - Geometry

Just like before University rooms are usually grouped into disciplines and are identified by unique room identifiers.

University projects tend to be a little larger in scope with one project concentrating on one building or phase of the project. You will also see residential projects as Universities are now tending to build their own Halls of Residence.

University - Plan View

Here we can see a typical University project – 5 floors in this case split across two Zones (one zone per drawing)  and a large amount of rooms (around 100 per floor) but now the structure of the building is a little more complicated.

Here we can see that each room is a square room – making it easier to calibrate with the Square tool.

Questions To Ask

When thinking about how to set up a project that involves a School or University there are a few questions that you need to ask to help you understand how to set up the Geometry. 

  • How many buildings are there? 
  • How many floors in each building are there? 
  • Is there one drawing for each floor or more than one drawing per floor? 
  • Are there any Zones or Wings? 
  • Elevation drawings – should there be one calibration per floor or one calibration covering the whole of the elevation?

Let's look at some definitions

  • A Location is
    a unique part of your project.
  • a Calibration is
    the way that Field View understands which part of the drawing represents a particular location in your project.
  • a Drawing is
    a way of identifying where you are in your project.

What menu options should each Administrator use?

Business Admin's  things and they work, mainly, in the  menu.

Project Admin's  things and they work, mainly, in the 

What is the primary skill that a Project Administrator needs?

Pick one answer only

  • Able to upload and revise drawings
  • Able to setup and maintain subcontractor Packages
  • Able to understand and construct project geometry
  • Able to create and edit new Users

How should you use Field View on your Project?

  • Field View is a location-based snagging tool. It's used for collecting information and managing my project - but not for building it.
  • Field View is a building tool. It's used for viewing drawings and measurements and ensuring that I build my building properly

Who should make the final decision on what your Project Geometry should look like?

Pick one answer

  • Project Administrators. They understand how Field View works and are best placed to make the decision.
  • Business Administrators. They are the Field View experts and are responsible for all decisions in the Business.
  • Project Editors. Site Teams understand how they will be working on a project and what they would expect to see on the tablet. They are best placed to make the decision.

Can different bits of a Project have different Geometry configurations?

  • Yes - different parts of the project will have different structures and Field View allows you to set up a unique structure for each part.
  • No - different parts of the project may have different structures but Field View does not allow you to set up multiple structures.

How does using the Geometry tree as a reporting tool work?

The  level of the Geometry structure defines the  level of reporting detail that you need for your project.

Can you use Field View's Geometry Folder structure in different ways? For example to create a document storage system?

  • Yes you can - Field View's flexibility means that you can make it work in different ways - but stepping outside Field View's core functionality means that you will have to make a compromise on performance.
  • No you can't - Field View's Geometry structure is only designed to work a certain way.

Which of these shows a typical Residential Plot configuration?

Which of these shows a typical School configuration?

Which of these shows a typical Hotel configuration?

Core Knowledge: Geometry Rules and Conventions

Geometry rules and conventions

Geometry rules and conventions.

While each project configuration will be unique there are some basic rules and conventions that you can apply to every project that will help you arrive at a project Geometry quickly.

Using these rules and conventions, rather than relying on examples, will allow you to configure any Field View project – whether you have seen something like it before or not.

Building Basics

Building Basics

Generally speaking every building is the same. It has an inside and an outside. We use this as a simple Geometry structure to define most of our Projects. Our first level of Geometry becomes:

  • Internals. Everything inside the building 
  • Externals. Everything outside the building. This includes Roof drawings and site drawings. 
  • Elevations. Everything around the building. 

The way you structure this will depend entirely on the drawings that you are using.

Building Basics - One building to a drawing

Building basics - one building to a drawing

Now let’s look at our Internals Folder. How you configure this will be dependent on whether you have one or more buildings in the project. For single buildings the next level of Geometry will be simple:

  • Internals 
    • Ground Floor 
    • First Floor 

The next lowest level of detail to Internals will be a Floor.

Depending on your Project you could call them Levels or Floors. Check with the Project Team.

What’s on your drawing will determine where you put it in the geometry structure and to an extend how the geometry structure will look. In our single building example we would put drawings at:

  • Internals 
    • Ground Floor. <- Drawing goes here
    • First Floor. <- Drawing goes here.

So it makes sense for our Geometry to go Internals > Floor.

But what happens when we have two buildings on the same drawing like the example to the right?

Building Basics - Two buildings to a drawing

Building basics - two buildings to a drawing

In this example the left hand side of the drawing is Block B and the right hand side is Block A. We could set up the geometry as follows:

  • Internals 
    • Block A 
      • Ground Floor. <- Drawing goes here 
    • Block B 
      • Ground Floor. <- Same Drawing goes here. 

Doing it this way however means that we have to upload the same drawing twice (once for each block) and calibrate only half of it each time. This is not efficient.

.

A better way to do this would be to flip the first to levels of the Geometry Round and put the drawing in a slightly different place.

  • Internals 
    • Ground Floor. <- Drawing goes here 
      • Block A 
        • Room 1 
      • Block B 
        • Room 1

This is much more efficient as it means that you only have to upload the drawing once (Once at the ground floor level covering both blocks) and you can set up both Block A and B at the same time and on the same drawing.

Unique Locations

Unique locations

Every location in Field View has to have it’s own unique ID. Here we can see a series of Classroom, each with it’s own Room Reference number. This will make setting up your Geometry easy as you can quickly see what room is what.

Sometimes, however, the drawing will show just four rooms called “Classroom”. You will need to differentiate between them to setup the geometry. You could do this by:

  • Checking with the project to see if they have updated drawings. 
  • Assigning a temporary name to each (e.g. Classroom 1, Classroom 2) until the project is able to allocate unique IDs

Ideally there will be a newer set of drawings available which have unique reference numbers on – you should always get these to setup the project with if possible.

If there are no other drawings available right now you will need to remember that:

  • At some point the rooms will need to be edited and given the correct names. 
  • The drawings will need to be revised to reflect the change.

Let’s look at an example

Unique locations - using unique room numbers

Here we can see that we have 6 rooms all called “Driver”. However each room has a unique room reference in the box underneath it. This makes it easy to set up the geometry for this location as it will be:

  • H03 : 00 : A.01 Driver 
  • H03 : 00 : A.02 Driver 
  • Etc

Room number will often follow a convention. Here we can see that this room is in Building H03, Floor 00.

Now let’s look at what happens when there are no references.

Unique locations - Creating your own classification

Here we can see that we have 6 rooms all called “Driver”. However in this case we do not have unique numbers for the rooms – and we can’t have 6 rooms called “Driver”.

If there is no available classification for the room then you will need to create your own – just so that the geometry can be build. It will look something like this:

  • Driver 1 
  • Driver 2 
  • Etc

You will need to confirm to the project how you have arranged this (i.e. start at the left and work right).

Unique locations - identifying room numbers

Room Numbers can be presented in a variety of ways – and not all of them are obvious. We’ve seen in the previous example a room number in a box underneath the room name.

We could also have the room number written next to the room name.

Sometimes, however, there is no room “name” just the room number. In the example here we can see that underneath each room Type we have a Room Number.

If in doubt always ask the project as they will know where the information is on the drawings.

Unique Locations - Risers

Unique locations - risers

Risers tend to have a similar problem when you look at the drawing. Sometimes they will be clearly named with a unique reference number – and sometimes not. There are a few ways that you can deal with this.

In this example we have a clearly named set of risers:

LTHW | CWS | IT | ELEC | SMOKE

In this case we can go ahead and create these as unique locations as we can clearly identify them.

But what happens if we have another set of risers in another part of the floor that have the same name?

In this case we would reference the risers against the location that they are closest to. In this particular case we can see that these risers are in Core 3. So our Geometry would be: 

  • Internals 
    • Floor 
      • Core 3 
        • LTHW Riser 
        • CWS Riser 
        • IR Riser 
        • Elec Riser 
        • Smoke Riser

But what happens when the risers are not named?

In the example here you can see that there are risers in between rooms – in fact 5 in this corridor. And all of them are not named. What do you do?

You could give each one a name – Riser 1, Riser 2 etc – but this is likely to become time consuming. In this case it is probably simpler as they do not have unique names to count them as part of the corridor. In all likelihood that is how the project team will snag them.

As always – if you are unsure you should check with the Project Team for their opinion.

Unique Locations - Open Plan Areas

Unique locations - open plan areas

Sometimes it’s not obvious where one area ends and another one starts. This is particularly prevalent in School projects – which tend to have open, communal areas.

Take a look at this example. Here we can see that we have a unique reference for this location “Collaborative + Social Dining”. But which bit is the Circulation and which bit is the Social Dining ?

In situations like this you will have to seek advice from the Project Team for them to mark out exactly how they need this area configured. Ask them to mark up the plan to show you what area is what.

Once they have shown you want area on the drawing describes the location it will make it easier for you to create your Geometry. 

In this case the project have decided that anything within the blue area is the Dining area and anything outside that in the red area is the Collaborative area. 

This makes our Geometry: 

  • Internals 
    • Floor 
      • Collaborative Area 
      • Dining Area

Unique Locations - Lifts

Unique Locations - Lifts

Lifts can pose some interesting questions when setting up geometries as the configuration that you will need to use is very dependent on the Project Team.

In this example here we can see that Core 3 has two lifts – Lift 1 and Lift 2 which are clearly named. We could easily set up our Geometry as:

  • Internals 
    • Floor 
      • Core 3 
        • Lift 1 
        • Lift 2

However, Project Teams usually snag the lift shaft, rather than each individual lift. In which case it would make more sense to them to see:

  • Internals 
    • Floor 
      • Core 3 
        • Lifts  

Examples like this highlight why it is vital to speak to the Project Team – the Geometry that is available to them on the tablet must make sense to the way that they work.

Unique Locations - Elevations

Unique Locations - Elevations

A similar kind of idea applies to Elevation drawings.

Elevation drawings are usually clearly marked – with each floor individually labelled. You can choose to create each individual floor in your Geometry – like this:

  • Elevations 
    • North Elevation 
      • Level 00 
      • Level 01 
      • Etc 

Remember what we said earlier about Level and Floor? You should try to be consistent with what is says on the drawing

Your project may not need that level of reporting detail for the elevations – so the next typical Geometry configuration would be in pairs of floors. Like this:

  • Elevations 
    • North Elevation 
      • Level 00 – Level 02 
      • Level 02 – Level 04 
      • Etc

This will reduce the work that you need to do and may be just as suitable for your Project Team to work on.

Project Geometry Flexibility

Project Geometry flexibility

As you have seen you can use Field View’s Geometry structure to configure a project in several different way – depending on your needs. This does, however, tempt you into creating complicated structure just because you can.

Stop. Field View works best when you keep it simple. Field View has a core set of functionally which works exceptionally well but it’s flexibility allows you to take one or more steps outside this functionality – which will almost certainly mean that you will have to make compromises to achieve what you want.

 If it feels like you’re pushing to get the system to do something or it seems more complicated than necessary – then you’ve probably stepped outside core functionality already and you should look to see what you can do to simplify the system

What would my basic Geometry structure be when I have 1 building to a drawing?

  • With one building to a drawing I would expect the Geometry to be Internals > Floors
  • With one building to a drawing I would expect the Geometry to be Floors > Building

What is the better Geometry structure when I have 2 buildings to a drawing?

In this example the left hand side of the drawing is Building B and the right hand side of the drawing is Building A

  • In the case of two buildings to one drawing I would expect my geometry to be Internals Block A Ground Floor <- drawing uploaded here Block B Ground Floor <- drawing uploaded here
  • In the case of two buildings to one drawings I would expect my geometry to be: Internals Ground Floor <- drawing goes here to cover both buildings at the same time Block A Room 1 Block B Room 1

Can different locations have the same name?

  • Yes - different locations at the same point in the Geometry structure can have the same name
  • No - different locations at the same point in the Geometry structure must have unique names.

Core Knowledge: Locations and Assets Drawing Calibration Menu

Finding things on the Field View website

Finding things on the website

As a Project Administrator you will have access to most of the available menu’s on the Field View website. This can seem a little daunting at first – don’t worry! When you get started as an Administrator it’s more important that you understand why you’re doing things rather than how you do them.

Learning where things are on the website then just becomes a matter of practice.

The one and only menu that you need to remember is this one:

Project Setup > Locations and Assets > Locations and Assets – Drawing Calibration

It’s the first menu option in the Project Setup menu. Remember – you are a Project Administrator so the functions that you will need are in the Project Setup menu.

The Drawing Calibration Screen

The Drawing Calibration screen

Here is our first look at the Drawing Calibration Screen. As you can see it is split into three sections.

  • Section 1. Project Information Pane. 
  • Section 2. Project Geometry Pane 
  • Section 3. Project Calibration Pane 

Each of these panes allows you access to various functions that you will need to set up your project.


The Drawing Calibration Screen - Project Information Pane

The Project Information pane

The Project Information Pane is the main reason that we recommend that this is the main menu option that you need to remember.

It gives you a list of everything that makes up your Project – locations, subcontractors, users, Devices, Forms etc But more importantly you can click on each item to go to the setup screen for that item.

This will save you having to remember a lot of menu’s at the beginning.

It also gives you an handy way to setup a project - follow this list, in this order to complete the setup of your project.

Hiding the Project Information pane

In the top right-hand corner of the Project Information pane is a small arrow that you can use to collapse the pane into the left hand side of the screen - giving you more room to see the project Geometry and the Calibration Pane.

Clicking on the arrow again will expand the Project Information pane back to it's original size.

Locations

Every project needs at least one location – otherwise you won’t have anywhere to raise your Tasks and Forms to.

The exact breakdown of these locations is called the Project Geometry and is shown in the next pane along.

Creating and setting up your locations, drawings and their calibrations is the longest part of setting up a project and will take around 80% of your time to do. The entire remainder of the setup is covered in the next 20%

Locations are a mandatory item to be able to use your Project.

Organisations and Packages

Once you have some locations to issue Tasks on you need someone to issue Tasks to. Field View manages your subcontractors through Packages. A Package consists of:

  • The email address of the person that’s doing the work 
  • The company that they work for 
  • The Trade that they represent. 

Each Package is configured specifically for your Project and subcontractors can be invited to collaborate on the system – logging in and managing their own Tasks via the website.

Packages is a mandatory item to be able to use your Project.

Users

Once you have someone to issue Tasks to you need someone to issue the Tasks!

This means that you will need some users on your Project. When we talk about Users in Field View we are always referring to Main Contractor Users rather than subcontractors. This is an important distinction as we will see later when inviting people to your Project.

Users is a mandatory item to be able to use your Project.

Standard Information

Field View is designed to stop you typing out Tasks – which slows you down. So we will need to add some standard pick lists to the Project. There are three main lists that are added to each project:

  • Task Types. These allow you to categorise your Tasks for reporting purposes. 
  • Causes. Why something happened. Allows you to record the reason that work occurred. 
  • Library Tasks. These are standard jobs for each trade, allowing your Site Team to pick Tasks from a list.

These pick lists are mandatory and are needed to be able to use your Project.

Devices

Now that we have somewhere to issue Tasks to, someone to issue them to, someone to issue them and some pick lists to allow you to issue them quickly we also need something to issue them on.

Every tablet that you use on your project needs a unique ID and password to be able to download your Project. The tablet can be assigned to your Project and can then be used by your Site Team.

Devices are a mandatory item that is needed to be able to use your Project. This is the last of the mandatory items – once you have added all these things your Project can be used.

Supplementary Items

There are also three supplementary items that can add items to your project. These are:

  • Form Templates. These are electronic versions of the forms that you use on your project. 
  • Communication Plan. This controls what notifications that you receive. 
  • Processes. Processes are a list of Tasks that are repeated across multiple locations. For example every apartment might need 1st fix carpentry followed by 1st fix M&E followed by 1st fix drylining etc. 

You do not need these to be able to start your project but they can add additional functionality to the system.

The Drawing Calibration Screen - Project Geometry Pane

The Project Geometry Pane

The second Pane is the Project Geometry pane. The icons in the top part allow you to select certain functions and the lower part contains the Geometry tree. This is the breakdown of the locations in your Project.

The first step in creating your Project is creating the Geometry tree.

You should, by now, have an understanding of what is needed on the Project to create the geometry tree. We will now run through each of the functions that you can use to create your Project Geometry so that we can see what they do.

The right-click menu

The next thing that you need to remember – to save having to remember where each and every function is – is the following rule:

  • When in doubt – right click!

In the Classic View in Field View most functions can be accessed by right-clicking on an item. This will activate a contextual menu – i.e. the menu options will change depending on the item that you clicked on.

Here we can see all of the options that you can access by right-clicking on the project Geometry. 

The Drawing Calibration Screen - Project Geometry Pane - Right Click Menu - Add a Location

The Right Click Menu - Add

Selecting Add will open the Add Geometry menu. This is where you will create new locations in your Geometry. The location you create will appear underneath the location you right-clicked on – like this:

  • Internals <- you right clicked here 
    • Level 00 <- your location will be created here.

If you then right-click and Add a new location on Internals your new location will be created at the same level as Level 00.

If you right-click and Add a new location on Level 00 your new location will be created underneath Level 00.

Description Field

There is only one mandatory field on this screen – and that is the Description field (indicated by a *). This name must be unique for the particular Geometry level that you create it at. Let’s look at how this works.

If my geometry structure looks like this:

  • Internals 
    • Level 00 
      • Room 1 
      • Room 1 <- you cannot create a duplicate here.

I cannot right-click on Level 00 and create another Room 1 as this already exists at this level.

If my geometry structure looks like this:

Internals 

  • Level 00 
    • Room 1 
      • Room 1 <- you can create a duplicate here.

As the second Room 1 location is not on the same level as the first then I can create a duplicate name here.

If you try to create a location with a name that already exists at that level you will receive a warning notification and the location will not be created.

Remaining fields - Reference

Most of the remaining fields on this screen are not used and are part of a way that we used to set up Field View – so may be removed in a future release. There are, however, 3 fields that are worth noting so that you know what they do.

The first is Reference.

Field View can generate a unique barcode for your locations that you can print out. You could then, for example, stick the barcode to the door of a room and use Field View to scan it – you can then access the location directly without having to search for it.

Each of these barcodes contains a unique reference number that identifies that location. These reference numbers are generated internally by Field View and cannot be viewed.

However, if you want to use your own reference for your locations you can enter a reference number in the Reference field and tick the Use Reference As Unique Number tickbox.

Field View will now use your reference instead when generating barcodes for your locations.

Remaining Fields - Type

The next useful field is the Type field. Clicking on the drop-down menu shows us that when using the Add menu you can create either a Location or an Asset.

An Asset is a “thing” that exists in that location. For example a table, a generator, a cooker, etc.

This field will default to Location for creating new items.

We will look at creating an Asset next.

Remaining Fields - Classification

The last of the useful fields is the Classification field. This allows you to “tag” your location and group things together. You could, for example, classify Room 1, 2 and 3 as “Apartment”.

This feature is used when assigning a Process to your project and allows you to quickly select areas to assign a Process to. For example “assign to all Apartments”.

If you are not using Processes on your project then you don’t need to use this feature.

Once you have selected your options for your location click Save to add the new location to your Geometry tree.

In this way you can continue to build up the Geometry structure until you have created all the locations that you need in your project.

The Drawing Calibration Screen - Project Geometry Pane - Right Click Menu - Adding an Asset

Adding an Asset

Next let’s add some Assets. Assets in Field View are fixed assets – i.e. they cannot be moved from where you create them. The primary use for Assets in Field View is asset checking – making sure that an asset has been installed or not, or checked or not.

Location Icon

Locations use a folder icon like this

Assets Icon

Assets use a tag icon like this.

It’s important to check every now and then that you have created locations as locations and not as assets as they have slightly different functionality and checking regularly will save issues further down the line.

Creating an Asset

Create your location as before by right-clicking on a location and selecting Add. This time enter a description and then click on Type.

Change the Type to Asset and press Save. Your Asset will now be created inside the location that you selected.

Updating your project on the website AND the tablet

Updating your project on the website AND the tablet

Remember – when you update something on the website (like creating new Geometry locations) – they won’t show up on the tablet until you press the sync button on the tablet.

This will download any new information from the website to your tablet.

If a tablet user tells you that they cannot see something on the tablet your first action should be to ensure that they sync their tablet.

The Drawing Calibration Screen - Project Geometry Pane - Right Click Menu - Editing a Location or Asset

Editing Locations and Assets

Now that we’ve added some Locations and Assets to our project we will want at some point to make some changes to them.

To do this right-click on the location that you want to change and select Edit.

What you can change

You can change any of the fields in the Add Geometry screen at any time.

The typical reason for using the Edit menu is when there has been a change to room reference numbers. You can right-click and Edit the location and just change the room number. Syncing the tablet will then update the room numbers for users in the Field.

You can also change a Location to and Asset and an Asset to a Location as well as changing the Classification of a location.

If you change a Location to an Asset (or the other way around) the icon in the Project Geometry won't update until after you have refreshed the screen

The Drawing Calibration Screen - Project Geometry Pane - Right Click Menu - Deleting Locations and Assets

Deleting Locations and Assets

Occasionally you will create a location by mistake or you will decide that you don’t need an area any more. You can remove things from the Geometry tree by right-clicking on a Location and selecting Delete.

A word of warning here about Field View terminology. There is a clear distinction between deleting something and de-activating something.

Deleting something is permanent – there is no recovery option. De-activating something just makes it invisible – it just needs to be re-activated to see it again.

Be clear about whether you’re clicking on delete or not.

Confirming Actions

The Delete has two fail-safe options to give you a last change before making a drastic change to your project.

The first is a Delete confirmation pop-up box.

When you delete a location you will be asked “are you sure you want to delete the selected geometry?”. If you have done this in error then just click No to be returned to the main screen.

If you select Yes you will receive no further prompts and that location will be deleted. Deleted locations can be recovered in some circumstances but you will need to let the Field View Support Team know immediately.

Deleting Locations or Assets with raised Tasks or Forms

The next fail-safe option occurs a little later on in your Project development – specifically when you have created Tasks or Forms at a location.

If you try to delete a Location that has existing Tasks or Forms you will receive a prompt to let you know that you cannot delete the location without removing the Tasks or Forms first.

Now would be a good time to look at how some of the items that make up our Geometry setup link together to help us understand what we can delete and when.

Location Structure

Location Structure - Drawings

There are three inter-connected things that make up the Location structure of your Project:

  • Drawings 
  • Locations 
  • Calibrations 

It helps to think of how they link together like this.

Drawings are the bottom “layer” of your structure. Your drawing will define what locations are going to be needed for your project.

Location Structure - Locations

The next “layer” of your structure is your Locations. Your location sits in the middle of your structure and defines what "bits" of your drawing exists. It doesn't link to your drawing as the location doesn't define what part of the drawing is covered - that's what the calibration is for.

The number of locations on your drawing will define how detailed your Geometry structure is. You can also “group” your locations – for example if 5 apartments make up a cluster then you can put all 5 apartments in a Location called “Cluster” and group them together.

All the locations in your Geometry structure should completely define your drawing

Location Structure - Calibrations

The final “layer” of your structure are the Calibrations. Calibrations are the unique way that Field View defines what part of a drawing relates to a specific location.

Each location on your project can have one location and one only. This makes sense as the calibration is showing you what part of the drawing applies to the location – it can’t be in two places at once!

Just like your locations all calibrations should define the complete area of your drawing.

Why look at the structure this way? Well it will help you understand what you can change without affecting anything else.

The Location Layer does not affect the drawing layer unless there is a calibration attached to the location.

Likewise the Drawing Layer does not affect the Location layer unless there is a calibration attached to the location.

Let’s see how this works in practice.

Changing a location

If I create a Geometry Structure like this:

  • Internals 
    • Level 00 <- drawing attached here 
      • Room 01 

And I change the Room name to Room 02.

I can do this without affecting the drawing. The Room may still be called Room 01 on the drawing but it does not affect the Location layer.

This is because the Location is not linked to the drawing - it just tells us what "bits" make up the drawing.

Replacing a drawing

Likewise – in the same structure:

  • Internals 
    • Level 00 <- drawing attached here 
      • Room 01 

If I replace the drawing at Level 00 (or even delete it) it will not affect the Location. Room 01 will still be Room 01 as we have not defined any link to the drawing (we do this with a calibration).

Let’s see what happens when I attach a calibration to my location.

Changing a Location with an attached Calibration

If I create a Geometry Structure like this:

  • Internals 
    • Level 00 <- drawing attached here 
      • Room 01 <- calibration attached here

You can see from the picture above a link has now been formed between the calibration and the drawing - not the calibration and the location.

What happens if you change the Room 01 name to Room 02?

You can do this as the area marked out on the drawing has not changed – only what we’re calling it. This allows you to make changes to Location names without affecting anything else.

Removing a drawing with an attached calibration

If I create a Geometry Structure like this:

  • Internals 
    • Level 00 <- drawing attached here 
      • Room 01 <- calibration attached here

And I remove the drawing at Level 00 - Field View will now warn me that I’m about to make a major change. 

As my calibration marks out a specific part of the drawing if I remove the drawing then Field View does not know where the calibration belongs – and so will delete the calibration as well.

As before if there are Tasks or Forms raised to a calibration you will not be able to remove the drawing.

Deleting a drawing and a location at the same time.

If you choose to delete a drawing (rather than remove it) just like deleting a location Field View will ask for confirmation - if you select Yes then the drawing, location and any attached calibrations will be deleted.

As before if there are Tasks or Forms raised to a calibration or location you will not be able to delete the drawing and the location.

Changing a location name with a Task attached to a calibration

When we add a Task or a Form we will generally be adding it to the Calibration layer.

  • Internals 
    • Level 00 <- drawing attached here 
      • Room 01 <- calibration attached here 
        • Task <- attached to the calibration 

If I now change the Room 01 location to Room 02 this is ok – as I am not changing the location of the calibration, just what the Location is called.

Deleting a drawing with a task attached to a calibration

If I try to delete the drawing Field View will now let me know that I am about to make a major change.

Our calibration has a link to the drawing as it specifies what part of the drawing applies to a particular location. As we saw previously if you delete the drawing it will also delete the calibration. However, in this case, because there is a Task attached to the Calibration you cannot delete the Calibration – and therefore you cannot delete the drawing.

Deleting a Calibration with an attached Task.

Finally if I try to delete the Calibration Field View will warn you that you about to make a major change.

The Task is linked to the Calibration and so Field View will not allow you to delete the calibration with it still there.

You would need to either delete the Task or move it somewhere else to be able to delete the calibration.

Adding a Task directly to a Location

You can also add a Task to a Location – even if it hasn’t got a calibration.

  • Internals 
    • Level 00 <- drawing attached here
      • Room 01 <- Task attached here

In this case the Task will be linked directly to the drawing. Now if I try to change the Location name this is still ok – it doesn’t affect the drawing.

However if I try to delete the drawing Field View will warn me that I am about to make a major change.

As the Task is attached to the drawing I cannot delete the drawing without first doing something about the Task.

I could either delete it or move it to another location before deleting the drawing

The Drawing Calibration Screen - Project Geometry Pane - Right Click Menu - Adding a Drawing from your Computer

Adding a Drawing

Now that we know how some of these things link together let’s look at how to add a drawing to our project.

There are two ways to add a drawing – either by uploading from your computer or by uploading from a Viewpoint for Project.

We’ve understood from our previous discussion on Geometry structure where we need to upload our drawing. To upload a drawing right-click on the location that you want to add it to and select Add Drawing.

Ways of uploading a drawing

Now that we know how some of these things link together let’s look at how to add a drawing to our project.

There are two ways to add a drawing – either by uploading from your computer or by uploading from a Viewpoint for Project.

We’ve understood from our previous discussion on Geometry structure where we need to upload our drawing. To upload a drawing right-click on the location that you want to add it to and select Add Drawing.

Uploading a drawing from your computer

There are three options on the upload screen:

  • Convert to Greyscale 
  • Upload at DPI
  • Upload

Convert to Greyscale will convert any colours in your drawing into shades of grey. This could have some benefit for some drawings and the calibrations will appear as red boxes on the tablet. If you have any red lines on the drawing it can be confusing when overlayed by the calibrations.

That said generally speaking you should leave the drawing as it is when you upload it. If it looks ok then it looks ok !

Upload at DPI will allow you to lower the resolution of the drawing when you upload it. When Field View uploads the drawing it will create a file called a Deep Zoom. The size of the Deep Zoom file is related to the size of the drawing and the level of detail (DPI) that it was created at.

This function was included when internal storage on tablets was at a premium. This is not the case anymore and is likely to be removed in a future release.

In any case we recommend that you upload drawings at the highest resolution so that they maintain their detail when you zoom in.

To select the drawing that you want to upload click on the Upload button in the bottom right hand corner.

You will now be presented with a standard file dialogue box. Search through your files to find the drawing that you need and then click the Open button in the bottom right-hand corner.

You can upload either PDF files or JPEG files to Field View.

Field View will now begin to upload your drawing. You will see a progress bar showing you how far through the process the file upload is.

Once the file has been uploaded the notification will change to “Image Being Processed”. Field View is now converting your drawing into a Deep Zoom file. This allows the drawing to work like Google Maps – allowing you to zoom in to areas on your drawing.

Once your drawing has finished being converted into a Deep Zoom file you will be returned to the main screen.

You can now see your drawing in the third pane – the Calibration pane.

Now that you have a drawing attached to your project there are now a few additional features and options that you can select.

Location Icons

Locations with drawings

Locations that have drawings attached to them will have a slightly different icon to other locations.

You can see here that the Location icon for Level 00 now has a small blue icon in the bottom right hand corner.

This indicates that there is a drawing in this location.

Locations with Calibrations

Locations that have calibrations attached to them will have a slightly different icon again.

You can see here that the Location icon for Room 1 now has a small solid blue (different to the drawing icon) icon in the bottom right hand corner.

This indicates that there is a calibration in this location.

If the location has a drawing and a calibration then the icon will be the solid blue icon of the calibration.

The Drawing Calibration Screen - Project Geometry Pane - Right Click Menu - Adding a Drawing from Viewpoint

Adding a drawing from Viewpoint

Now that we know how to add a drawing from your computer let’s have a look at the other option – Add Drawing  From Viewpoint.

Two things will need to be enabled first so that this feature works. This first is that Viewpoint Features have to be enabled for your business. This has to be done by a  Business Administrator.

If you want to be able to upload drawings to Field View from Viewpoint for Projects then check with your Business Administrator that this function is enabled.

Once Viewpoint Features are enabled you will need to enter your Viewpoint for Projects password into Field View to link both systems.

Make sure that you are in the Classic Field View menu options and click on the My Field View menu on the left hand side.

Click on the Viewpoint For Project Credentials menu to enter your Username and Password. Once you have entered your details click Save. If successful the message at the top will change to Login Access to Viewpoint is Valid.

You will now need to log out and back in to Field View.

Go back to Locations and Assets > Locations and Assets – Drawing Calibration and expand your Geometry tree again until you can see the location that you want to add your drawing to again.

Right-click on that location and this time select Add Drawing from Viewpoint.

Similar to the upload from your computer you will now see the VfP Enterprises that you have access to in the pane on the left hand side.

Navigate through the structure until you find the container with the drawing that you want. Select the drawing from the right-hand side and then click the Upload button in the bottom right hand corner.

Uploading a drawing from VfP gives us one additional option a bit later when we are looking at Replacing a drawing – specifically, like we can see here, the drawing will be uploaded and will remember what revision was uploaded.

Just like adding a drawing from your Computer Field View will take a little while to generate a Deep Zoom of the drawing and the you will be taken back to the Drawing Calibration screen with you drawing now showing in the calibration pane.

The Drawing Calibration Screen - Project Geometry Pane - Right Click Menu - Replacing a Drawing

Replacing drawings.

As we've seen you cannot remove a drawing when there are Tasks or Forms assigned to a calibration linked to that drawing. This can be inconvenient when you need to update a drawing to reflect recent changes. There are two circumstances to consider when replacing a drawing:

  • Cosmetic changes. For example - Room 01 is now called Room 02
  • Major Structural changes. For example - Room 01 has been knocked through to Room 02

Each of these has one thing in common - that you can replace the drawing currently uploaded to Field View with a new one. But each one has it's own set of considerations that you will need to think about when making the change.

Replacing a drawing originally uploaded from your computer

Clicking on Replace Drawing will open the Replace Drawing screen. There are 4 actions to complete on this screen:

  • Upload the replacement drawing
  • Specify two locations on the original drawing to use as sizing anchor points.
  • Specify the same locations on the replacement drawing to use as sizing anchor points.
  • Replace the drawing.

Step 1 - Selecting a drawing to upload

Click on the Upload  Drawing button in the top left to start the upload process.

As before you can choose between replacing with a drawing from Viewpoint or replacing with a drawing from your computer. In this example we are going to replace with a drawing from your computer.

As before you can select your drawing and then click Upload to save the replacement drawing to Viewpoint. 

Once the upload is complete you will be returned to the Replace Drawing screen and your replacement drawing will now be loaded on the right-hand side.

Step 2 - Set anchor points on the original drawing

Now you need to set some anchor points on the original drawing. This will make sure that any changes in size from the original drawing to the replacement will be updated to the calibrations - so that they stay in the same location as the original.

Zoom in on the drawing on the left-hand side and select an easily identifiable point in the top left-hand corner of the drawing. Drag the Green arrow to that point on the drawing.

Now zoom out and then move and zoom in on an easily identifiable point in the bottom right hand corner of the drawing.

Drag the Blue arrow to that point on the drawing.

If you need to step back, click on the red X button to remove the last anchor arrow that you added.

Step 3. Add anchor points to the replacement drawing

Now that you've added the anchor points to the original drawing you need to repeat the same process with the replacement drawing.

  • Select the same point in the top left of the replacement drawing that you did on the original drawing and drag the Green arrow there.
  • Select the same point in the bottom right of the replacement drawing that you did on the original drawing and drag the Blue arrow there.

You should now have a set of anchor arrows on each drawing.

Step 4. Replace Drawing

Once you have added all four anchor points a final button will appear in the top right - Confirm Drawing Replacement.

Once you press this the process is irreversible.

The replace drawing process will take a little while as Field View calculates the positioning of any Calibrations, Tasks and Forms on the original drawing and uses the anchor points to make any adjustments so that they remain in the same location on the replacement drawing.

Once the process is complete you will be returned to the Drawing Calibration screen with the replacement drawing displayed.

Replacing a drawing with a drawing from Viewpoint.

You can also replace an existing drawing with a replacement drawing directly from Viewpoint for Projects. To do this, select Replace Drawing in the right-click menu, click on Step 1 - Upload Drawing and then select Replace With Drawing From Viewpoint.

Just like when adding a drawing for the first time the Replace With Drawing From Viewpoint option will open a dialogue box showing you the Enterprises that you have access to.

Navigate through the folder structure and select the drawing that you want to use.

Field View will now upload this and then return you to the Replace Drawing screen. You can now replace the drawing in exactly the same way as before.

Replacing a drawing that was originally added from Viewpoint for  Projects

As we mentioned earlier if you added a drawing through Viewpoint for Projects then you get an additional option when using the Replace Drawing feature.

As we can see, Field View recognises that the original drawing came from Viewpoint for Projects and contains revision information. Selecting Replace With Current Revision Drawing From Viewpoint will get Field View to check the drawing revision information in Viewpoint for Projects and automatically upload the latest, published revision of that document.

Current drawing is the latest revision

If the drawing that its being used in Field View is the current revision of the drawing then you will get a notification that the drawing is the current revision and the upload will not go ahead.

Current drawing is not the latest version

If there is a newer version of the drawing on Viewpoint for Projects then Field View will automatically upload the newer version. 

You will then be returned to the Replace Drawing screen with the uploaded revision displayed in the right-hand pane.

You can now continue to replace the drawing as before.

Things to consider when replacing a drawing

Drawings for snagging - not drawings for construction

It can be easy to get carried away revising drawings in Field View - and this is usually unnecessary. Consider this:

In a construction sense you always want to have the latest version of the drawing - because you are using it to build your building. Even minor changes can have a major impact on your building.

In a snagging sense you don't have to have the latest version of the drawing. If the only difference between Revision A and Revision B is a small comment in the bottom right-hand corner what difference is this going to make for snagging?

Minor changes

Consider a minor change - Room 01 is now called Room A01 - and the drawing has been up-reved from Version A to Version B.

Looking at the drawing Room 01 is still in the same place and is still the same shape and size. So the only thing in Field View that needs to change is the Location name. The drawing and the calibration can still remain the same as there have been no changes that affect them.

You might want to revise the drawing if the fact that the drawing says Room 01 but you need to tap Room A01 on the tablet is confusing for the site team - but remember you don't have to replace the drawing for every minor change. This will save you considerable time in the long run.

Major Changes

Consider a major change - Room 01 has now been knocked into Room 02 to make a completely new room. The drawing has been up-reved from Version A to Version B.

Looking at the drawing Room 01 is still in the same place, is still called Room 01 but the shape and size are now completely different. This will affect the calibration as it does not now cover the Room 01 location on the drawing.

You now need to revise both the drawing and the calibration to account for this change. You can use the Replace Drawing function to update the drawing to the latest revision and you will need to use the Project Calibration tools to change the calibrated area to reflect the new shape of the room.

Major changes to locations with existing Tasks and Forms

As we've seen - you cannot make changes to calibrated locations where there are existing Tasks or Forms - you must deal with them first. You have two options to do this - each has it's own benefit and drawback.

Option 1. Use the Tablet to move each Task or Form to a new, temporary location

Using the Cut and Paste functions on the tablet you could move each Task or Form to an adjacent room temporarily. Once all items have been moved you can replace the drawing and update the calibration. Syncing the tablet will then draw down the new information and you can then Cut and Paste the items back to their original locations.

Benefit: This will allow you to retain the Pin on the drawing.

Drawback: Very manual process and you will need to make a record of where the Tasks or Forms were originally to be able to move the pin back to that location.

Option 2. Use the website to move the Tasks or Forms to a new, temporary Location.

You can edit each Task or Form on the website and change the location quickly to a different one (for example if the Task was raised on Level 01 > Room 01 you could change it to Level 02 temporarily). Once all items have been moved you can replace the drawing and update the calibration. You will now need to repeat the process on the website and move the Tasks or Forms back to their original Location.

Benefit: Slightly less manual process than using the tablet

Drawback: This option will mean that you will lose the Task or Form Pin on the Tablet. Items will still be reporting as being in the correct location but will not show a pin on the Plan View. You will need to use Location Summary to see the list of items.

Careful consideration should be given to each option to decide what will work best in each circumstance. A possible "best case" scenario would be to move Closed tasks or form using the website as the pin is not important for these and use the Tablet to move Open or Complete tasks only - which will retain the location Pin for these items.

The Drawing Calibration Screen - Project Geometry Pane - Right Click Menu - Removing a Drawing

The Drawing Calibration Screen - Project Geometry Pane - Right Click Menu - Deactivating an Area

Deactivating a Location

Once you have created your locations in your Geometry Tree it's possible that you will reach a point in the project where you no longer need specific areas. Like we saw in Location Structure, once you have raised Tasks or Forms to a location you cannot delete that location without deleting the associated items.

The alternative is to Deactivate an area. As we've said previously:

  • Delete is a hard delete. Once you select this option and confirm that item will be permanently removed from Field View.
  • Deactivate just removes the item from view - makes it invisible as it were. It can be reactivated at a later date if required.

Deactivating an area will stop that location (or locations) syncing with the tablet. The locations can still be viewed on the website (see below) and any Tasks or Forms will still be visible in reports on the website.

To deactivate an area of geometry use the geometry tree to select all areas that you want to deactivate by putting a tick in the tickbox next to them.

Deactivating will deactivate a location and everything underneath it. So in the example opposite deactivating the Room 1 location will also deactivate the Central Core location and the Everything Else location.

You can only deactivate one "branch" of your geometry at a time. Even if you select multiple branches you will only deactivate the item that you right-clicked on.

Once you have selected your locations, right click on the highest location in the tree and select Deactivate.

You will receive a warning message asking you to confirm that you want to take that action.

If you select Yes the Geometry Tree will refresh and you will no longer be able to see the location.

You can also use the lightbulb button above the geometry tree to deactivate areas. As before select the locations that you want to deactivate in 

Viewing deactivated Geometry

To view deactivated geometry you will need to use the buttons at the top of the Geometry Pane.

Click on the Show All Geometry button and the geometry tree will refresh and roll up.

If you expand the Geometry tree back to the location that you deactivated you can now see the deactivated geometry areas. 

They will be greyed out to distinguish them from active areas.

The Drawing Calibration Screen - Project Geometry Pane - Right Click Menu - Activating an Area

Activating an area

There are two options for reactivating an area:

  • Activate. This will only activate 1 location - the one that you right-clicked on. It will not activate any locations under this.
  • Activate All. This will activate the location that you right-clicked on and all locations under that one.

Activate

To activate a single location you will need to use the Toggle Parent button to ensure that you select a single location.

When selecting items in the Geometry location if you select a parent folder then that will automatically select all locations under it.

Also, if you select all child folders, that will automatically select the parent folder.

To stop this happening - and to allow you to select one location only - click the Toggle Parent button first before selecting any locations.

Once you have selected the area you want to reactivate right-click on the location and select Activate.

The greyed-out icon will now change back to yellow indicating that the location is active and will resume syncing to the project.

Activate All

To activate a location and all other locations under it select the required locations in the geometry tree and click Activate All.

The greyed out icons will now change back to yellow - indicating that the locations are active and will resume syncing to the project.

The Drawing Calibration Screen - Project Geometry Pane - Right Click Menu - Cut, Copy and Paste

Cut, Copy and Paste

Your geometry structure is not fixed and can be changed using the Cut, Copy and Paste functionallity. You can also drag and drop locations in the tree structure to rearrange it as you need to.

Cut and Copy will affect locations only - it will not copy drawings or calibrations. For that we will need to use the Clone function - which we will look at later.

There are a few restrictions to what you can do which we will look at below.

Cut and Paste

To Cut and Paste a location to move it somewhere else in the Geometry Tree right-click on the location that you want to Cut and select Cut.

If you want to Cut a whole branch of Geometry then right-click on the highest location in the branch and select Cut.

Now right-click on the location that you want to paste the Cut Geometry into. You will see that the Paste option is now visible.

Select Paste to move the selected Geometry to the new location.

Cut and Paste on a location with a calibration.

As mentioned Cut and Paste will move the Location only - not the drawing or the calibration.

If you attempt to Cut and Paste a location that has an attached calibration Field View will warn you that doing this will remove the calibration from the location.

If you select Yes then the location will be cut and the calibrations removed from that location - even if you don't then paste the location somewhere else.

As we've seen before - if there is a Task or a Form attached to the Calibration then you will not be able to Cut and Paste the location until you have dealt with the items attached to it.

Copying Geometry

You can also Copy locations - even copy entire branches of Geometry. This is useful for when Level 01 is exactly the same as Level 00 just with different room numbers. Copying the Geometry will save you having to add each location in again - you can just change the room numbers as needed.

To copy a location to move it somewhere else in the Geometry Tree right-click on the location that you want to copy and select Copy.

If you want to Copy a whole branch of Geometry then right-click on the highest location in the branch and select Copy.

Now right-click on the location that you want to paste the Copied Geometry into. You will see that the Paste option is now visible.

If you paste the copied geometry into a Location with the same name then Field View will rename the location "Copy (x) <Location Name>" - like the example on the right.

Here we copied Level 01 and pasted it into the main location. As a location called Level 01 already exists there Field View has pasted the geometry with a new name "Copy (1) Level 01"

If you paste the copied geometry into a Location that does not have the same name then Field View will paste the geometry with the same name that it was copied with - like the example on the right.

Here we copied Level 01 and pasted it underneath the Level 01 location. As there is no location called "Level 01" already underneath the original Field View has pasted the geometry without changing the name.

Dragging and dropping geometry

As well as Cut and Paste you can also drag and drop Field View geometry to change the structure. Differently to Cut and Copy - drag and drop will move:

  • Locations
  • Calibrations
  • Drawings

To drag and drop a location left click and hold on a location and then drag it.

A black bar will now be generated on the Geometry Tree which shows you at what level the location will be dropped at.

Here we can see that the bar extends to the tick box next to Substructure. This means that the location will be dropped at the same level as Substructure - and underneath it.

You can also drag and drop locations inside other locations.

Here we can see that the bar extends to the tick box next to Level 02. This means that the location will be dropped inside the Level 02 location above the GA-04 location.

You cannot drag and drop a location inside another location if the destination is empty. There must be at least one other location in the destination for the drag and drop to work.

Drag and drop locations with calibrations

When dragging and dropping a location you must be careful that you don't move away from the tier that it was originally created at.

Here we can see that the Level 02 location exists at the same tier as Level 00 and Substructure and has a calibrated location under it.

I can drag and drop the Level 02 location to anywhere as long as it is at the same level that it was originally. i.e. I can drag it to before Substructure, after Concrete Pour etc.

However if I try to move it up or down a level (for example drag it into the Level 00 location) then Field View cannot be sure that the calibrated locations will still be at the lowest level - and so will delete the calibrations.

As before if there are Tasks or Forms attached to the calibration then you will not be able to drag and drop the location if that drag and drop would result in the calibration being deleted.

The Drawing Calibration Screen - Project Geometry Pane - Right Click Menu - Clone

Cloning Locations

As we've seen for Cut and Copy these functions will only affect the locations in your Geometry - not the drawings or the Calibrations. The Clone tool allows you to copy all three:

  • Locations. Will be copied in the same way as the Copy tool
  • Drawings. Can either be copied or replaced with an alternative as part of the process
  • Calibrations. Will be copied exactly "as is". Unlike the Replace Drawing function Calibrations that are cloned will not be resized if the drawing size or orientation changes. 

As Clone affects all three items the Clone tool can only be used on locations that contain a drawing.

The Clone tool has two options for the drawing and one for the Calibrations. The drawing options allow you to:

  • Copy the existing drawing. This is useful for buildings where the structure of each floor is the same and one drawing is used for all floors (for example floors 2-5 are the same drawing you just replace the room numbers on each floor). Hotels are good examples of this.
  • Replace the existing drawing. This is useful for buildings where the structure is the same from floor to floor but a different drawing is used for each floor.

You can then choose to copy the existing calibrations or not.

Copy Existing Drawing

Selecting Copy Drawing will work every time as Field View will simply take the existing drawing and replicate it. This way any Calibrations that are attached to the drawing will always be in the same place.

To Clone a location be copying the existing drawing put a tick in Copy Drawing and Copy Calibrations. This will copy the Drawing, the locations and the Calibrations.

If you select Copy Drawing only then the drawings and the locations will be copied - but not the Calibrations.

Replace Existing Drawing

If you want to replace the drawing then click on the Replace Drawing button first. This will open the usual Upload Drawing dialoge box that we've seen before.

It's important to note that when using Clone you can only upload drawings from your Computer - there is no link to enable you to upload from Viewpoint for Projects.

As mentioned, when using the Replace Drawing feature the replacement drawing must be exactly the same as the original as the calibrations will not be resized if there is any difference.

Here we can see an example of this. The replacement drawing was not the same size as the original and now the calibrations are out of line with the drawing. 

There is no way to correct this using the Clone feature.

The Drawing Calibration Screen - Project Calibration Pane - Navigating the drawing

Navigating the drawing - Mouse Controls

Once you have uploaded a drawing you can navigate around it using standard mouse controls.

  • Drag to move. To move around the drawing first ensure that the Polygon Tool is highlighted. Then left-click and hold on your drawing to drag it around the screen.
  • Middle Mouse Wheel to Zoom. By moving the mouse wheel up and down you can zoom in and out of your drawing.

Zoom Control

You can also zoom in and out on the drawing using the Zoom control at the top of the web page.

Click and hold the slider and drag to the left to zoom out and drag to the right to zoom in.

Rotate Control

You can also rotate the drawing to make it easier to view and to draw calibrations using the Rotate control at the top of the web page.

Click and hold the slider and drag to the left to rotate anti-clockwise and drag to the right to rotate clockwise.

Click the green arrow above the slider to reset the drawing to it's original alignment.

The Drawing Calibration Screen - Project Calibration Pane - Adding a Calibration - Square Tool

Step 1. Select the location that you want to calibrate.

Once you have created your locations and added your drawings you need to add your calibrations. Calibrations have to be attached to a specific location in your Geometry Tree - remember your Calibrations need to be at the lowest levels in the Geometry structure.

To select a location to calibrate make sure that it is selected in the Geometry structure by left-clicking on it once so that it highlights blue.

Step 2. Navigate the drawing.

Once you have selected your location you now need to navigate to that section of the drawing. Make sure that you are zoomed in as much as possible so that the location that you want to calibrate fills the centre of your screen.

Make sure that you leave a little bit of space around the location to draw your calibration.

Step 3. Select the square calibration tool.

Once your location is in the centre of your screen you now need to select the square calibration tool.

Click on the square icon just above the drawing - remember you will not be able to navigate the drawing while you have the square tool selected.


Step 4. Draw your calibration

Select a point just outside the location that you want to calibrate (1) and then left-click and hold on the drawing. Drag your mouse pointer in a diagonal to create a square - you will see the outline of the square on the drawing.

Select a second point (2) (again just outside the location that you are calibrating) and then release the left mouse button. Your square calibration will now be set.

Calibration icon

Once your location is calibrated the Geometry location will have an additional icon. 

Calibrated locations have a solid, dark blue square in the bottom right hand corner.

Things to remember

Remember when calibrating to leave a small overlap to the location that you are calibrating. We do this to make it easier to drop a Task or Form pin on the walls when using Field View on a tablet. Adding the overlap ensures that the Task or Form is always created in the correct location.

The Drawing Calibration Screen - Project Calibration Pane - Adding a Calibration - Polygon Tool

Step 1. Select the location that you want to calibrate.

Once you have created your locations and added your drawings you need to add your calibrations. Calibrations have to be attached to a specific location in your Geometry Tree - remember your Calibrations need to be at the lowest levels in the Geometry structure.

To select a location to calibrate make sure that it is selected in the Geometry structure by left-clicking on it once so that it highlights blue.

Step 2. Navigate the drawing.

Once you have selected your location you now need to navigate to that section of the drawing. Make sure that you are zoomed in as much as possible so that the location that you want to calibrate fills the centre of your screen.

Make sure that you leave a little bit of space around the location to draw your calibration.

Step 3. Select the polygon calibration tool.

Once your location is in the centre of your screen you now need to select the polygon calibration tool.

Click on the triangle icon just above the drawing - remember you can still navigate the drawing with this tool selected.

Step 4. Draw your calibration

Select a point just outside the location that you want to calibrate (1) and then left-click to start the polygon. Move your mouse pointer to the next point in your polygon (2) and left click. A line will now be drawn between the two points. Remember to stay just outside the location when drawing your lines.

Continue to draw the points of your polygon (3 and 4) until you are back where you started. To close the polygon double left-click on the last point to complete the polygon. You can also double left-click on the last but one point (4). This will draw a line from the last but one point back to the first point and then close the calibration. Your polygon calibration will now be set.

Calibration icon

Once your location is calibrated the Geometry location will have an additional icon. 

Calibrated locations have a solid, dark blue square in the bottom right hand corner.

Things to remember

Remember when calibrating to leave a small overlap to the location that you are calibrating. We do this to make it easier to drop a Task or Form pin on the walls when using Field View on a tablet. Adding the overlap ensures that the Task or Form is always created in the correct location.

The Drawing Calibration Screen - Project Calibration Pane - Adding a Calibration - White Space

White Space

The second reason that we overlap areas in this way is to reduce the “white space” available on a drawing – that is any area that is not covered by a calibration. Let’s look at calibration again – this time calibrating the rooms tightly to the walls.

Here you can see that the calibrations are tighter to the walls of the rooms – there’s hardly any overlap. There is nothing wrong with calibrating like this but it does make it harder for your users to pin tasks to walls accurately on the Tablet and also makes it harder for you to calibrate an area accurately. Let’s look at the adjoining wall between the middle room and the room on the left.

Calibrations with a slight overlap

Here you can see that the calibrations have overlapped slightly (indicated by the darker blue line). Users will need to be careful if they raise a Task or a Form to this wall to ensure that they don’t raise it in the wrong room – a couple of pixels either way could make the difference.

Gaps between calibrations

Here you can see that in an effort to get it as close as possible the calibrations have a gap between them which is only a couple of pixel thin. This gap can cause some problems in where a Task or Form is raised – let’s have a look at what can happen.

Tasks and Forms are assigned by Field View to a location based on the calibrated area that they are created on. For example – dropping a pin in the right hand room will create the Task in Room 3 as Field View knows that the calibrated area selected belongs to Room 3.

But what happens when you drop the pin in the “white space” gap above? Now there is no calibrated area for Field View to use to assign a location.

In this case the Task or Form will be created in the next available Location that Field View can identify. This will be the location with the Drawing attached to it.

The Drawing Calibration Screen - Project Calibration Pane - Adding a Calibration - Overlaps

Overlapping calibrations

Overlaps can cause a similar issue as described above when dropping a pin on white space. This is particular to the tablet and can be easily avoided if using the tablets properly – but it is useful to know what happens.

It is possible, on the tablet, to select all areas on a drawing at the same time. For example, you could select all rooms on the First Floor by selecting the “First Floor” location in the Geometry Tree and then switching to view the drawing. This will, by default, select all locations at the same time.

On the tablet these will all appear red. So what happens when we drop a pin at the point indicated above? This point is on an overlapping area – so will Field View create the pin in Room 1 or Room 2?

Selecting the correct location.

Remember Field View uses the Calibration to decide what location in the Geometry Tree to pick. In this case you have not selected a location (or at least a specific location) so Field View will have to pick for you.

The choice will be made based on the highest location in the Geometry Tree. In this case Room 1 comes before Room 2 – so the item will be created in Room 1.

This can be avoided by making sure that you select a specific location before creating the Task or Form. In that case the selected location will be the only red square.

Completely overlapping calibrations.

You can see that the calibrated area is a darker blue than normal. This is because there are two completely overlapping calibrations.

This will cause us the same problem as described above and can lead to Tasks and Forms being created in incorrect locations. We do not recommend that you calibrate areas in this way.

The Drawing Calibration Screen - Project Calibration Pane - Removing a Calibration

Removing calibrations.

To remove a calibration right-click on a location that contains a calibration (denoted by a solid, dark blue square against the location) and select Remove Calibration from the menu.


No Tasks or Forms against a Location.

If there are no Tasks or Forms created against a calibration that you are trying to remove Field View will prompt you to check that you are sure that you want to remove the calibration.

If you select Yes then the calibration will be removed from the location.

Tasks or Forms against a Location

If Tasks or Forms have been raised against a Location then you will not be able to delete the Calibration without dealing with them first.

If you want to keep them then you must move them to a new location before deleting the calibration.

If you don't want to keep them then you will need to delete all Tasks or Forms associated with that location before deleting the calibration.

The Drawing Calibration Screen - Project Calibration Pane - Cutting Images for Reports

Cut Images for Reports

Calibrations are also used in the reports sent to subcontractors. A snapshot of each location is used to indicate where each item is located.

These snapshots are generated by pressing the Cut Images for Reports button. You will need to do this at least once for your project - don't press this after every calibration! Once you press this button it will take a snapshot of every calibrated location that you have created to that point.

Ideally you should capture the snapshots at regular intervals while creating your calibrations:

  • Every time you finish a floor.
  • Every time you finish working on Field View

Images Cut confirmation

You will get a notification message to say that this is being done.

Once you press the Cut Images For Reports button it may take some time for you to be able to move onto another page in Field View. This is because Field View is working on creating snapshots for every location on your Project.

Reports without image snapshots

If you forget to take a snapshot of a location an error message will display on any reports for that location - this will not stop the report being issued to a subcontractor.... but you might get asked by a subcontractor what the text at the top of their report means.

The error message will look a little like the example above.

Unique Calibrations - Donutting

Calibrating a room within a room.

But what if you have a situation where your “room” has an internal room – with no connection to the outer walls. For example, think of the floor plan of an open plan office with a central “core”. The Core has it’s own walls inside the Office – but as they don’t touch the outer wall how can you calibrate it? Let’s look at the issue.

In our example let’s imagine that our Room 1 has an inner room.

Here you can see the inner room (selected in the Geometry and highlighted by the calibration).

We now need to calibrate the outer area – but no matter what tool we use, square or polygon – the end result is going to be the same…. a closed box which will overlap the inner area completely.

You can see that the inner area is now overlapped by the outer area and has gone dark blue – and we do not recommend that you do this. To calibrate these kinds of locations correctly you will need to use a technique we call “Donutting” – effectively we are going to exclude the inner area from the outer area with a little trick

Let’s try this again – we’ll create the inner area as before but this time we’re going to use the Polygon Tool to create the outer area.

If you follow the polygon points above you can see that we “cut out” the inner area by drawing across to it, going round the inside, and then back to the original shape. We call this donutting as it’s like trying to draw a donut without taking your pen off the paper.

When we create the outer area we can see now that we have two distinct areas – the inner area and the outer area.

This now means that when you drop a pin on these areas it will correctly select the location based on the calibrated area.

Unique Calibrations - Linking Locations

Linking locations

You can also use the same technique that we used in donutting to link two areas of a drawing that are not next to each other with one calibrated area.

By following the points above you can see that we’ve connected the two areas with a line between them. This means that dropping a pin inside either box will count as the same location.

We wouldn’t recommend over-use of this technique as it can make things messy for your tablet users. But it can be effective in some cases.

The Drawing Calibration Screen - Project Calibration Pane - Changing Calibrations

Changing Calibrations

Once you have set the points for a calibration polygon you cannot change them. The only option that you have is to delete the calibration and then create a new one.  Generally speaking there are only two occasions where you will want to change a calibration:

  • Mistakes. If the calibrated area is incorrect (e.g. you missed a bit out) then you will need to change the calibration
  • Drawing Updates. If the physical characteristics of the building change (e.g. you knock Room 1 into Room 2) then you will need to re-calibrate the area as you will have two calibration areas where you need one.

 In both cases you will need to delete the calibration and start again.

Expert Knowledge : Locations, Assets and Calibrations

The Drawing Calibration Screen - Project Geometry Pane - Bulk Geometry Download

Bulk Geometry Download

So far we have seen how to add Locations into the Project Geometry one-by-one by right-clicking and using the Add function.

You can also add Locations in bulk by using the Bulk Geometry Upload / Download functions. These will allow you to add Locations into an Excel spreadsheet and then import them to your Project.

Downloading the Project Geometry Spreadsheet

To start adding new Location you will first need to download the Project Geometry spreadsheet. This is a specially formatted spreadsheet that allows you to add information to your Project Geometry.

Click on the Download Geometry button to get started. This will download an Excel spreadsheet to your computer.

Click the Download Project Template button to start the download. 

Once the Project Template has downloaded open the file to edit it. You will need Microsoft Excel (or an equivalent) to do this.

The Drawing Calibration Screen - Project Geometry Pane - Editing Bulk Geometry

Editing Bulk Geometry

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** The Drawing Calibration Screen - Project Geometry Pane - Bulk Geometry Upload

** The Drawing Calibration Screen - Project Geometry Pane - Location and Assets Barcodes

Setting Location and Asset Classifications

Setting Location and Asset classifications

As we saw when creating a location or asset you can also add a classification - i.e. a "tag" that categorises either a location or an asset. This allows you to take some bulk actions on some functions - for example Add a "Sink" asset to all "Bathrooms"

Setting classifications can be set in:

Project Setup > Locations and  Assets > Locations and Assets - Grid View

Classifications need to be created by a Business Administrator first before they can be used on locations in your Project. If there is a particular Classification that you need then speak to your Business Administrator.

Setting a Classification

In the Location and Assets - Grid View select the Location or Asset that you want to assign a classification to by clicking on the tick box next to it.

Once you have selected the location or asset that you want to assign a classification to click on the Set Classification icon in the menu bar above the Geometry list

Click on the drop down to display the available classifications.

Click the appropriate classification and then click Save

You will then be asked to confirm if you want to apply the selected Classification to the locations or assets that you selected.


The second confirmation asks you if you want to deactivate any Assets below this location that have been previously assigned a classification. If you select OK then the Assets will be deactivated and removed from view. 

If you select Cancel then the Assets will remain and will have a different classification to the parent location.

Viewing classifications

Once you have saved your classifications settings the Classification column will be updated with your choice - the web page does not automatically refresh, so you will need to refresh your browser to see the information.

The Classification column will show the classification of the specific item -  in the example above the Level 0 location was classified as "Mechanical Room". The locations under this have inherited this classification - and this shows as the Parent Classification. 

Lower level items can have their own classifications as well - in the example above we can see that the parent location is classified as "Mechanical Room" but the specific Asset is classified as a "Cooker".


Assigning Checking to Assets

Assigning Checking to Assets

The main use of Assets in Field View is Asset Checking - that is, confirming whether an Asset has been "checked". This could be that the Asset has been installed or that the Asset is recorded as present.

To activate this function you need to add an Asset Checking workflow to your Assets.  Workflows need to be created by a Business Administrator - if you need a specific workflow for you asset checking you will need to speak to your Business Administrator.

Asset Checking workflows can be added to your Assets in:

Project  Setup > Locations and Assets > Asset Checking - Tree View

Asset Checking - Tree View screen

The left hand pane of the Asset Checking - Tree View shows the Geometry tree for your project.

The right hand pane shows you the available workflows that you can assign to your assets.

Selecting your Assets

First select the Assets that you want to assign checking to from the geometry list on the left.

If you need to select individual Assets (and not the parent location) click the Select Parent toggle icon above the geometry tree.

Selecting your Checking Workflow

Next select the Workflow that you want to use from the list on the right hand side.

Remember your workflow needs to have been created by a Business Administrator before you are able to assign it.

Assigning your Workflow to your Assets

Once you have selected the Assets that you need and the workflow that you want to use click the blue < arrow at the top left of the workflow pane to assign the workflow to your selected Assets.


You will now be prompted to select the classification that you want to apply your checking workflow to.

As you've selected each individual Asset select the last option - All Selected Locations and Assets - then click Assign

Once you click Assign you will be returned to the Asset Checking - Tree View screen and the geometry list will have been updated to show the workflow assigned to the location.

You will now be able to set a status for each selected Asset - either on the website or on the tablet.

Un-assigning checking from an Asset

To un-assign a checking workflow from an Asset find your Asset in the geometry tree and right click on it. You will now have the option to un-assign a checking workflow from that specific location or that location and all locations underneath it.

After a brief update the geometry tree will refresh and the workflow name will no longer be listed against the Asset name.

If you need to un-assign a workflow from all locations and assets then select the workflow in the right-hand pane and then click the red X above the workflow pane. The selected workflow will then be removed from all locations and assets in the project.

Bulk Add / Edit Assets

Bulk Adding and Editing Assets

If you have classified your locations you can use the Bulk Add / Edit Assets function to add Assets to multiple locations in one go or update Asset details across your Project in one go.

You can access the Bulk Add / Edit function by going to:

Project Setup > Locations and Assets > Locations and Assets - Drawing Calibration


Selecting the type of location to use

You will first need to select the type of location that you want to edit. Select a Location Classification that you want to apply your changes to.

If you have not classified your locations then the dropdown list will be blank and you will not be able to use this function.

Bulk Adding Assets

The classification you selected will now be displayed in the left hand pane and the asset information that you can edit in the right hand pane.

Like we saw when adding an Asset not all fields are used but you will need to input a description for your Asset

Next you'll need to specify the Type - in this case we need to select Asset to create a set of assets for the project.

You can also use this functionality to bulk add locations to your project but the Bulk Geometry Upload function is a more efficient way to do this. We recommend that you use the Bulk Add / Edit function just for Assets.

Finally you will need to specify the classification of the Asset itself.

Remember classifications are created by a Business Administrator. If there is a specific classification that you need you will need to speak to your Business Administrator first to create it before using it on your project.

Clicking Save will create an Asset with the details that you have specified in every location that matches the Classification that you specified.

Bulk Editing Assets

You can also edit details for multiple Assets at the same time. Open the Bulk Add / Edit function and select the type of location that you want to edit Assets for.

Assets that exist in the location classification that you have selected will show in the left hand pane. To edit them right click the Asset that you want to change and click Edit. The details of the Asset will be updated in the right hand pane. 

Make changes as required and then click Save. All Assets that come under the selected classification will then be updated with the changes that you made.

** Assigning Workflows to Locations

Core Knowledge: Setting Up a Project in Field View - Step 2. Adding Organisations and Packages

Setting up a Project in Field View - Step 2

Setting Up a Project In Field View - Step 2. Organisations and Packages

Now that you've set up your Locations, Drawings and Calibrations the next step in setting up a Project is to add your Subcontractors. There are two screens that we use to add subcontractors to a Project - the Organisations menu and the Packages menu.

As before we can access these menus through the Project Setup > Locations and Assets > Locations And Assets - Drawing Calibration menu. Clicking on either Organisations or Packages on the left hand side will take you to the appropriate menu.

Alternatively in the Project Setup menu the Organisations Setup and Packages menus will take you to the same place.

Core Knowledge: Section 7 - Organisations and Packages

The Organisation Menu

Managing Organisations on your Project

The Organisation Setup screen lets you manage the companies that are associated with your project. This is slightly different to the Packages for your project - Organisation Setup just deals with managing the company.

To access the Organisation Setup screen go to:

Project Setup > Organisations Setup

Searching Organisations

You can search organisations on both your Project and on the System by using the Search bar at the top of the page.

Type a name into the Organisation Name Contains field and Field View will search for a company name that contains that text.


You can also specify whether your search applies to Organisations on your Project or Organisations in the System (or both!) by putting a tick in the appropriate box.

By default the search will look for both Project and System Organisations.

Finally you can specify how many Organisations you can see on screen at any one time. You can choose between 50, 75 and 100 Organisations.

By default 50 Organisations at a time will be displayed.

Once you have selected the Search options that you want click Search on the right-hand side to update the screen.

The Organisation Menu - Assigning an Organisation to your Project

Assigning an Organisation to your Project

To associate an Organisation with your Project you need to move it from the right-hand System Organisation list to the left-hand Project Organisation list.

Select the Organisation that you want to assign to your Project from the System Organisations list and put a tick in the selection box next to it.

Once you have completed your selection press the blue < button to assign the Organisation to your Project.

The Organisation Menu - Editing Organisation Roles

Edit Organisation Options

You will now need to set some basic options for the Organisation that you assigned to your Project.

First you need to set an Organisation Type. Organisation Type is a reporting tool that allows you to report on how many of each type of Organisation you have on your Project. Most of the time you will select Subcontractor.

You also need to set an Organisation Role. This is a security group that sets the permissions (what people attached to this Organisation can and cannot do) for this Organisation.

Each of the standard Roles available in Field View has a short description that tells you what each of them does. Again, most of the time you will be selecting Subcontractor.

Important Note on Organisation Role

You might find an occasion where you need to add your own Organisation to your Project. If you do, when selecting an Organisation Role leave all options blank. An Organisation Role will overwrite a a User-specific Role. Subcontractors normally do not have specifc User Roles so rely on an Organisation Role to control what they can and can't do in Field View.

As you and your Company will have User Roles (Project Editor, Project Admin etc) then if you assign your Organisation to a Project and give it an Organisation Role everyone in your company will be given that role. This means if you pick Subcontractor - everyone in your company will be given the same rights as a subcontractor. Your Administrators will need to contact Field View Support to resolve this.

The Organisation Menu - Editing Organisation Contact Details

Set Organisation Contact Details

Once you have set your Organisation Type and Organisation Role click Save and the Organisation Contact Details screen will open.

This screen allows you to enter some contact information for this Organisation - the most important field is the Email field. It's important to add an email address to your Organisation to make sure that you can issue Tasks and Forms to that Organisation

You can also specify whether you want a report containing new Tasks that have been issued to the Organisation sent to them automatically overnight. 

Task Reports contain all Tasks issued to this Organisation over the last 24 hour period and are sent at around 2am.

You can also set this option in the Packages screen later.

Once you have added your Organisation contact details click Save to add the Organisation to your Project.

The Organisation that you selected will now appear on the left-hand Project Organisation list.

The Organisation Menu - Editing an existing Organisation

Editing an existing Organisation

Editing an existing Organisation allows you to change the Organisation Type or the Organisation Role for that company.

To edit an existing Organisation right-click on the Organisation that you want to change and select Edit Organisation.

This will open the Edit Organisation screen. Here you can change the Organisation Type as required as well as the Organisation Role.

Changes will update when you click the Save button.

The Organisation Menu - Editing an existing Organisation's contact details

Editing and existing Organisation's contact details

You can also edit the contact details of an existing Organisation - for example to update their contact email address.

You can edit an Organisation's contact details by right-clicking on the Organisation and selecting Contact Details.

This will open the Organisation Contact Details screen. You can change any contact details within this screen as well as updating whether overnight Task reports are sent to the Organisation or not.

Changes will update when you click the Save button.

The Organisation Menu - Removing Organisations from your Project

Un-assigning an Organisation from your Project

If you need to remove an Organisation from your Project you will need to un-assign it from the Project Organisation list on the left back to the System Organisation list on the right.

To un-assign the Organisation select it by putting a tick in the selection box and then pressing the blue > pointing right.


You will be asked to confirm that you want to un-assign the Organisation. If the Organisation is attached to a Package this will also deactivate:

  • Any associated Packages
  • Any subcontractors associated with the Organisation.

If you click OK the Organisation will be removed from your Project.

Controlling Organisation

When your Project is created your own Organisation will be added to the project - this is known as the controlling organisation.

You cannot remove the controlling organisation from your Project - if you try Field View will warn you that it is not possible.

The Organisation Menu - Exporting Information

Exporting Organisation information

You can export information on the Organisations attached to your Project by clicking on the Excel icon above the Project Organisations list.

This will generate an excel file that will contain:

  • The Organisation name
  • Account no
  • Organisation Type
  • Email

For all Organisations attached to your Project.

You cannot export additional information (such as Address, Contact Number) from here. You will need to use the Field View API to get this information.

** The Packages Menu

** The Packages Menu - Adding a Package to your Project - Package Details

** The Packages Menu - Adding a Package to your Project - Organisation Details

** The Packages Menu - Adding a Package to your Project - Invitation Details

** The Packages Menu - Editing an existing Package on your Project

** The Packages Menu - Deactivating a Package from your Project

** The Packages Menu - Searching for Packages

** The Packages Menu - Exporting Information

Section 8 - Project Users

** The People Setup Summary Menu

** The People Summary Menu - View a Users details

** The People Summary Menu - Edit Project Specific Roles

** The People Summary Menu - View Rights

** The People Summary Menu - Searching for Users

** The People Summary Menu - Deactivating Project People

** The People Summary Menu - Exporting information

** The Assign Menu

** The Assign Menu - People From My Business Unit - Assigning Users to your Project

** The Assign Menu - People From My Business unit - Editing Project Specific Roles

** The Assign Menu - People From My Business Unit - Removing Users from your Project

** The Assign Menu - People From My Business Unit - Searching for Users

** The Assign Menu - Exporting User information

Section 9 - Standard Project Information

** The Task Type Menu

** The Task Type Menu - Assigning Task Types to your Project

** The Task Type Menu - Edit Project Task Type - Edit Task Type Name and Resolution Period

** The Task Type Menu - Edit Project Task Type - Edit Workflow Roles

** The Task Type Menu - Setting the Default Task Type

** The Task Type Menu - Removing Task Types from your Project

** The Task Type Menu - Searching for Task Types

** The Task Type Menu - Exporting Task Type information

Section 17 - Exam

Take The Exam