Ecolab - Costco - Warewash Training

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Introduction to Warewash

Ecolab - Introduction to Warewash

https://youtu.be/7pJpMXl6-cE

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WareWashing Machines &
Dish Room Best Practices

What is a Mechanical WareWasher ?

(aka Dish Machine / Utensil Washer)

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A Dish Machine is a 3-Compartment Sink In A Box

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WareWashing Machines & Dish Room Best Practices

  • Mechanical warewashing provides an alternative to the 3-step manual cleaning process of Wash – Rinse - & Sanitize typically performed at the 3-Comp Sink.
  • When correctly utilized a properly operating dish machine can:

  • Reduce labor in time spent @ the 3-Comp Sink

  • Increase crew productivity as it relates to their ability to perform other activities in the Restaurant / Operation

  • Ensure wares have been properly washed and sanitized

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WareWashing Machines & Dish Room Best Practices

High Temp vs. Low Temp Dish Machines

  • What’s the difference?
    • High Temperature Dish Machines:

  1. Final rinse water sprayed on the Ware must be delivered at a temperature of 180⁰ - 194⁰ F.
    1. Final Rinse Water is heated to this temperature by a Booster Heater that is either an integral component of the Dish Machine, or is an external Device plumbed-in upstream of the Dish Machine.
    2. Typically, high temperature Dish Machines require the water in the Wash Tank to be maintained at a minimum temperature of 150⁰ F. This is achieved by a Heating Element located within the Wash Tank of the Dish Machine.
    3. The ultimate goal is to raise the surface temperature of the Ware to 165⁰ F at the completion of the Final Rinse to achieve Sanitization.

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WareWashing Machines & Dish Room Best Practices

High Temp vs. Low Temp Dish Machines

  • What’s the difference?
    • Low Temperature Dish Machines:

  1. A Chemical Sanitizing Agent, typically Chlorine, (Sodium Hypochlorite) at a minimum concentration of 50 PPM, is mixed in with the Final Rinse Water and sprayed on to the Ware during the Final Rinse Cycle.
    1. Typically, the Temperature of the water & Chlorine Sanitizer mixture delivered / sprayed onto the Ware’s during Final Rinse must be maintained at a temperature no lower than 120⁰.
    2. Low Temperature, Chemical Sanitizing Dish Machines, require that the Wash Water be maintained at a minimum Temperature of 120⁰ F.
    3. Typically, Low Temp Dish Machines do not have any type of integrated Heating Element’s in their Wash Tank. They receive their Hot Water from a domestic Hot Water Heater.

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WareWashing Machines & Dish Room Best Practices

A Dish Machine is a Dish Machine is a Dish Machine!

  • There are actually dozens of makes and models
  • They come in various shapes and sizes
  • They are referenced as – Ware Washers, Dish Machines, Dish Washers, Utensil Washers, Rack Washers, etc.
  • At the end of the day, regardless of their physical appearance or what they’re referenced as, they all perform the same 3 step process of Wash – Rinse - & Sanitize

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WareWashing Machines & Dish Room Best Practices

Machine Types

Stationary Rack

Conveyor (Rack)

Conveyor (Flight Type)

Utensil Washers

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WareWashing Machines & Dish Room Best Practices

Machine Types

  • Stationary Rack
    • As the name implies, Wares are arranged on a Rack that is manually pushed into the Machine, where they sit in a static position throughout the Wash-Rinse- & Sanitize cycle.

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WareWashing Machines & Dish Room Best Practices

Machine Types

  • Conveyor
    • Wares, arranged on a Rack, are propelled through the various stages of the Wash-Rinse- & Sanitize process via a motorized Conveyor, which is an integrated part of the Dish Machine.
    • Conveyor Type Unit’s may also have additional sections that include pre-wash & pre-rinse compartment’s.

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WareWashing Machines & Dish Room Best Practices

Machine Types

  • Flight Type
    • In a Flight Type Unit no Racks are used. The Machines’ moving Conveyor is configured with Peg’s that are used for arrangement of the various pieces of Ware that will be run through the Unit.

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WareWashing Machines & Dish Room Best Practices

Machine Types – Operational Differences

Retained Wash Solution:

  • A dedicated source of Hot Water and Detergent maintained at a specific temperature by a Heating Element within the Wash Tank of the Dish Machine.
    • Wash Water is pumped under pressure through the Wash Arm’s and onto the Ware.
    • Most often associated with High Temp Dish Machines.
    • Wash Tank Solution is “refreshed” every time the Machine goes through the Final Rinse Cycle. Rinse Water is “always” fresh potable water.
    • Water level within the Wash Tank is maintained at a constant via use of an “Overflow” within the Wash Tank

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Stationary Rack

Retained Wash Solution

Wash Cycle

1.Rack of Ware’s placed into machine and cycle started

1800 F Rinse Water

DISH RACK

DISH TABLE

DISH TABLE

SCRAP TRAYS

2. Wash pump is activated, draws wash solution out if tank, thru wash arms/nozzles. Sprayed onto Ware’s

3. Wash solution drains back into tank, passing thru scrap trays

PUMP

WASH

4. Solution continues to be recirculated throughout wash cycle.

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Stationary Rack

Retained Wash Solution

Rinse Cycle

2. Timer opens 1800 water solenoid to allow rinse water in rinse arms. Sprays over Ware’s, drains into tank

1800 F Rinse Water

DISH RACK

DISH TABLE

DISH TABLE

SCRAP TRAYS

1. At end of Wash Cycle, pump stops, delays to drain solution from Ware’s, rinse starts.

3. Rinse water drains into wash tank, dilutes wash solution, level rises and overflows

OVERFLOW TO DRAIN

PUMP

WASH

4. Dish Rack removed onto Dish Table to air dry.

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Single Tank Conveyor

1800F FINAL

RINSE WATER

DISH FLOW – LEFT TO RIGHT

1. Rack of Ware’s inserted into machine, goes thru wash then final rinse out clean

DISH RACK

DISH RACK

DISH RACK

DISH RACK

CLEAN DISH TABLE

SOILED DISH TABLE

3. Rinse water flows to wash tank, diluting wash solution, level rises, tank overflows

2. Wash water returns to wash tank after spraying Ware’s.

OVERFLOW TO DRAIN

WASH TANK

PUMP

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WareWashing Machines & Dish Room Best Practices

Machine Types – Operational Differences

  • Dump & Fill Type:
    • At the conclusion of the Wash Cycle, a Drain Solenoid open’s allowing the full content’s of the Wash Tank to empty.
    • After a brief period of Dwell, allowing for full evacuation of Wash Solution, a Solenoid Valve opens allowing “fresh potable water” to enter the Machine.
    • This fresh potable water is then utilized for the Final Rinse.
    • Dump & Fill Machines are “typically” Low-Temp Machines.
    • In a Low-Temp Machine, a Chemical Sanitizing Agent (usually Sodium Hypochlorite) is introduced along with the fresh potable Rinse Water.
    • The Final Rinse Solution becomes the Wash Water for the next Cycle.

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Stationary Rack

Dump And Fill

Wash Cycle

SOLENOID VALVE

Fill Water

DISH RACK

DISH TABLE

DISH TABLE

SCRAP TRAYS

1. Machine fills (1.5-2 gal.), detergent added, pump draws wash solution from tank, thru arms/nozzles to spray ware’s.

2. Wash solution drains back into tank, passing thru scrap trays

PUMP

WASH

4. Solution continues to be re-circulated throughout wash cycle, 45 seconds avg.

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Stationary Rack

Dump And Fill

Drain

SOLENOID VALVE

Fill Water

DISH RACK

DISH TABLE

DISH TABLE

SCRAP TRAYS

1. When Wash Cycle done, pump stops, drain valve opens

2. Wash Solution drains from tank, arms, ware’s.

PUMP

WASH

DRAIN

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Stationary Rack

Dump And Fill

Rinse Cycle

SOLENOID VALVE

SOLENOID VALVE

Fill Water

Fill Water

DISH RACK

DISH RACK

DISH TABLE

DISH TABLE

DISH TABLE

DISH TABLE

SCRAP TRAYS

SCRAP TRAYS

1. Machine again fills (1.5-2 gal.), sanitizer may be added, pump draws rinse solution from tank, thru arms/nozzles to spray ware’s.

2. Wash solution drains back into tank, passing thru scrap trays

2. Wash solution drains back into tank, passing thru scrap trays

PUMP

PUMP

WASH

WASH

3. Solution continues to be re-circulated throughout wash cycle, 30 seconds avg. Rinse solution may be drained or retained per model.

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WareWashing Machines & Dish Room Best Practices

Best Practices & The 5 Factors of Cleaning

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5 Factors that contribute to Clean Ware

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5 Factors -- Debit / Credit

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FIVE FACTORS OF CLEANING

Improper procedures can impact

all the other factors, reducing the

overall effectiveness of your

cleaning operation.

Procedure is the one thing that the end-user has full control over!

  • Proper Procedures include:
    • Pre-Scraping / Pre-Rinsing
    • Correct utilization of the Dish Rack

  • Procedures

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FIVE FACTORS OF CLEANING

  • Temperature

Improper / lower than specified temperature, will impact product performance and overall effectiveness of the cleaning & sanitization process in a WareWash Unit.

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FIVE FACTORS OF CLEANING

  • Agitation/Mechanical Action/Pressure
  • Proper pressure in WareWashing operations increases the ability of the wash solution to remove Soil.
  • This ties directly to proper procedures, as well as overall Dish Machine cleanliness!

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FIVE FACTORS OF CLEANING

  • Chemical Action
  • Only use Products specifically formulated for Mechanical WareWashing.

  • Certain Wares, such as those made of Aluminum and Pewter, require use of a Detergent Product that is “Metal Safe”.

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FIVE FACTORS OF CLEANING

  • Time
  • For Wares that are heavily soiled, or have baked-on food soil, allowing some period of time for pre-soaking can be prove to be very advantageous.
  • Some WareWash Machine Models allow the end-user to vary the length of the Wash Cycle, thus maximizing the effectiveness of the Washing process.

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WareWashing Machines & Dish Room Best Practices

Best Practices

  • Operational Checks
  • Care & Maintenance

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WareWashing Machines & Dish Room Best Practices

  • Operational Checks
    • Gauges
      • All Dish Machines have Analog or Digital Readout Gauges which provide the end-user with a quick and easy method for verifying Temperatures & Pressure.
      • By law, Dish Machines must have working Gauges that indicate the temperature of the Wash Tank, as well as the Final Rinse in Hot Water Sanitizing Units.
      • In the case of a Hot Water Sanitizing Unit, a working Pressure Gauge must also be clearly visible.

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WareWashing Machines & Dish Room Best Practices

Temperature Gauges are prominently displayed with recommended operating temperatures posted in either close proximity to the Gauge or on a tag and/or placard somewhere on the Dish Machine itself.

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WareWashing Machines & Dish Room Best Practices

  • Per the Food Code: A working Pressure Measuring Device (a Gauge) must be clearly visible. This Gauge will indicate the pressure at which the Final Rinse water is being delivered at.
  • The acceptable Range is between 15 – 25 PSI with 20 PSI being the optimum pressure.
  • Final Rinse Water delivered at 20 PSI is also how most Dish Machine manufacturers calculate the water usage per cycle.

Final Rinse Pressure (flowing)

Static Pressure (at rest)

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WareWashing Machines & Dish Room Best Practices

  • Operational Checks

Wash Arms & Rinse Jet’s

  • Clogged Wash Arms and Rinse Jet’s will result in an ineffective wash, and more critically, Wares that may not be Sanitized.
    • Clogged or partially blocked Wash Arm’s are usually a clear indicator that proper pre-scrapping procedures are not being adhered to.
    • As the Final Rinse is always fresh potable water, clogged Final Rinse Jet’s are typically a result of sediment, debris, or mineral scale build-up due to hard water.
    • All Dish Machines have Wash Arm’s and Rinse Jet’s that may be removed for periodic cleaning.

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Rinse Arms, Jet’s & Nozzle