Pressure Injury Knowledge Pre-Quiz

Don't stress!! Relax!!

These quizzes are for your own benefit to gauge learning progress.

Just answer what you know, there is no need to look up answers online as this is for your own learning.

These quizzes will be based on: 

 

These quizzes are both identical, to be taken before and after the Pressure Injury eLearning module.

Remember to just have fun with it!

Pressure Injury Knowledge Pre-Quiz

What are the 3 basic layers of the skin

  • Epidermis, Dermis, Subcutaneous
  • Epidermis, Dermis, Sebaceous
  • Epidermis, Subcutaneous, muscular

What layer of skin acts as a barrier for protection, stores melanin, keratin, and creates new skin cells

  • Subcutaneous
  • Dermis
  • Epidermis

What layer of skin would you find sebaceous glands, capillaries, follicles and nerve ends.

  • Epidermis
  • Subcutaneous
  • Dermis

What layer of skin would you find arterioles, fat, and collagen.

  • Dermis
  • Epidermis
  • Subcutaneous

What is a Pressure Injury

  • localised damage to the skin and soft tissues predominantly on bony areas of the body or related to a medical device
  • The injury causes damage to all layers of the skin
  • The injury occurs after prolonged pressure to the skin, that may include shear or friction.
  • The injury can be intact skin or an open wound

Select the factors that can contribute to pressure injuries

  • Poor nutrition or age
  • Incontinence or moisture
  • co-morbidities or disease
  • Dry or oily skin
  • immobility or inactivity
  • Friction or shear forces
  • not moisturising every day

What people are more at risk of developing pressure injuries

  • Older people
  • People that are largely immobile
  • People with dry skin
  • People that are largely incontinent
  • People that do not moisturise daily

How many classifications of pressure injury are there

  • 4
  • 5
  • 6
  • 8

What are the classifications for pressure injury

  • Stage 1
  • Stage 2
  • Stage 3
  • Stage 4
  • Stage 5
  • Stage 6
  • Unstageable
  • Deep Tissue Injury

Which of the following is Stage 1 classification?

Select the image to view full picture, then choose the appropriate option

Which of the following is Stage 2 classification?

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Which of the following is Stage 3 classification?

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Which of the following is Stage 4 classification?

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Which of the following is the Unstageable classification?

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Which of the following is the Deep Tissue Injury classification?

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Match to the correct description

Glossary:

Slough: yellow or white devitalized tissue, that can be stringy or thick and adherent on the tissue bed.

Eschar: dead necrotic tissue, may be dry, moist, or leathery

Tunneling: a channel/ forms from the wound bed into or through the subcutaneous layer or muscle.

Undermining: the tissue erodes under the wound edges

  • Stage 1
    Skin is intact with non-blanching . This is usually over a bony areas.
  • Stage 4
    Full-thickness loss of skin, tissue necrosis, and damage to bone, muscle, or other supporting structures that are exposed. Slough, eschar, tunnelling or undermining may be present.
  • Stage 3
    Full thickness skin loss, epidermis and dermis loss, subcutaneous fat may be visible. Bone, tendon or muscle are not exposed. Slough or eschar may be present.
  • Deep Tissue Injury
    Depth unknown, discolored intact skin that is dark red, purple or maroon in color. It may also appear as a blood-filled blister resulting from damage to underlying soft tissue.
  • Unstageable
    Depth unknown, base is covered in slough (yellow, grey, green or brown), and/or eschar (tan, black, brown), has necrotic areas. The depth cannot be determined until necrotic tissue is cleared.
  • Stage 2
    Partial-thickness skin loss, with loss of the epidermis and some of the dermis. It appears as a shallow ulcer with a red-pink color. No slough or necrotic tissue is present in the base. It may also appear as an enclosed or open serum-filled blister.
  • Stage 5
    This classification does not exist
  • Stage 6
    This classification does not exist