Third Generation OBTs (3G)

This course will help you become part of the Third Generation of OBTs.

Giving instructions for At The Pet Store L0+

General Guidelines

3 things to keep in mind when teaching the lesson

  1. Keep it short and simple. 
    • Use simple vocabulary and simple sentences. One-word instructions are acceptable, too. The key is to limit number of words to less than seven (7).
  2. Use resources. 
    • Use AC tools, ManyCam, and teaching aids (props and realias) to help students understand questions and instructions.
  3. Use Gestures and TPR. 
    • Gestures are actions that will help the student understand a question and/or instruction better. 
    • TPR (Total Physical Response) are actions meant to be copied by the student to indicate undertstanding.

Let's match the guidelines

  • Keep it short and simple.
    Use simple vocabulary and simple sentences. One-word instructions are acceptable, too. The key is to limit number of words to less than seven (7).
  • Use resources
    Use AC tools, ManyCam, and teaching aids (props and realias) to help students understand questions and instructions.
  • Use Gestures and TPR.
    Gestures are actions that will help the student understand a question and/or instruction better. TPR (Total Physical Response) are actions meant to be copied by the student to indicate undertstanding.

The Techniques for At The Pet Store L0+

Title Page

Title Page

Technique #1

After the introductions:

  1. Keep it short and simple: “Look! Animals!”
  2. Use resources: The teacher shows flashcards of animals or stuffed animals. Points at the props. “Animals.”
  3. Use Gestures and TPR: The teacher circles the animals on the whiteboard. Points at the dog. Shows gesture for ‘look’. “Look! Dog”. Shows gesture for ‘dog’. “OK, let’s go!”

Technique #2

After the introductions:

  1. Keep it short and simple: “This is a pet store.”
  2. Use resources: The teacher encircles the pet store sign. “This is a pet store.”
  3. Use Gestures and TPR: The teacher shows gesture for 'say'. “Pet Store. Good! Next.”

Technique #3

After the introductions:

  1. Keep it short and simple: "Our lesson is, At the Pet Store! Let’s go!”
  2. Use resources: The teacher boxes the title ‘At the Pet Store’.
  3. Use Gestures and TPR: The teacher shows gesture for ‘let’s go’. “Let’s go!”

Warm - Up

Warm-up 

Technique #1

  1. Keep it short and simple: “Let’s sing!”
  2. Use resources: The teacher shows a toy microphone.
  3. Use Gestures and TPR: The teacher stands up. “Stand up!” The teacher shows gesture for ‘sing’. “Let’s sing!” The teacher sings while standing up and doing the gestures.

Technique #2

  1. Keep it short and simple: "Listen to me, eyes on me. Okay. Let's sing!”
  2. Use resources: The teacher uses a toy microphone and demonstrates singing. The teacher rewards the student with a star afterwards.
  3. Use Gestures and TPR: The teacher enthusiastically sings the song while showing the gesture for ‘say’.

Technique #3

  1. Keep it short and simple: “Let’s sing!” The teacher then demonstrates the song by singing first.
  2. Use resources: The teacher uses a toy microphone and demonstrates singing. The teacher rewards the student with a star afterwards.
  3. Use Gestures and TPR: The teacher uses the gestures for each animals as they sing. The teacher moves to the next page by saying, “Let’s go!”

Lead-in / Transition

Lead-in / Transition

Technique #1

  1. Keep it short and simple: “Look! Timmy. Pets.”
  2. Use resources: The teacher encircles Timmy. “Look! Timmy.” The teacher encircles the animals. “Pets!”
  3. Use Gestures and TPR: The teacher shows gesture for ‘look’. “Look! Timmy. Look! Pets.” The teacher shows gesture for ‘let’s go’. “Let’s go!”

Technique #2

  1. Keep it short and simple: “Timmy & his parents are at the pet store. Look at the animals! What's this?”
  2. Use resources: The teacher encircles one of the animals on the shelf. “What’s this?” After all the animals were encircled and praising the student, the teacher just clicks on the next page.

Technique #3

  1. Keep it short and simple: “This is a pet store.”
  2. Use resources: The teacher shows flashcards of the animals. “Pets.” The teacher shows the ‘repeat’ gesture. “Timmy wants a pet.” The teacher encircles the animals.
  3. Use Gestures and TPR: The teacher shows the gesture for ‘repeat’. “Pet store.” The teacher clicks to the next page while saying, “Next!”

Introduction of Language

Presentation of Target Language

Technique #1

  1. Keep it short and simple: “Look! Cat.”
  2. Use resources: The teacher encircles the cat. “Look! Cat.” The teacher shows a flashcard of cat. Points at the prop. “Cat.”
  3. Use Gestures and TPR: The teacher shows gesture for ‘say’. “Cat.” The teacher uses the finger method. “It’s a cat.”

Technique #2

  1. Keep it short and simple: “A cat. A cat. A cat.”
  2. Use resources: The teacher encircles the cat. “Look! Cat.” The teacher shows a toy cat. Points at the prop. “Cat.”
  3. Use resources: The teacher underlines the phrase. “A cat. A cat. A cat.” The teacher shows the gesture for ‘say’. “A cat.” The teacher encircles the cat. “What is this?”

Technique #3

  1. Keep it short and simple: “Look! A cat!”
  2. Use resources: The teacher shows a cat plushie. “A cat.”
  3. Use Gestures and TPR: The teacher shows gesture for ‘look’. “A cat.” The teacher shows gesture for ‘say’. “A cat.” The teacher uses the finger method. “It’s a cat.”

Practice #1

Jump and Say

Technique #1

  1. Keep it short and simple: “Stand up!”
  2. Use Gestures and TPR: The teacher stands up. “Bird!” The teacher jumps. “Fish!” The teacher jumps.

Technique #2

  1. Keep it short and simple: “Look!” The teacher shows a toy bird and a toy fish.
  2. Use resources: “Bird!” The teacher makes the toy bird jump. “Fish!” The teacher makes the toy fish jump.

Technique #3

  1. Keep it short and simple: “Stand up!”
  2. Use Gestures and TPR: The teacher stands up. “Follow me.” The teacher claps. “Bird!” The teacher claps. “Fish!”

Practice #2

What's Missing?

What's Missing?

Technique #1

  1. Keep it short and simple: “Look!”
  2. Use resources: “What’s this?” The teacher encircles the first cat (then the second, then the third cat). “What’s this?” The teacher encircles the fish. “What’s this?” The teacher shows the next page. The teacher encircles the missing spot. “What’s missing?”

Technique #2

  1. Keep it short and simple: “What's this?”
  2. Use resources: The teacher encircles the cat (the one that would disappear in the next page). “What’s this?” The teacher clicks the next page.
  3. Use Gestures and TPR: The teacher shows gesture for ‘look’. “Look!” The teacher shows gesture for ‘what’s missing?’. “What’s missing?”

Technique #3

  1. Keep it short and simple: “Look! What’s this?”
  2. Use resources: The teacher encircles the cat. “What’s this?” The teacher shows a flashcard showing a cat. After the student gave the correct answer, the teacher moves to the next page. The teacher encircles the question mark.
  3. Use Gestures and TPR: The teacher shows gesture for what’s missing. “What’s missing?”            

Shining Time

Shining Time

Technique #1

  1. Keep it short and simple: “Where is mommy? What’s this?” The student answered, “It’s a cat.” “Do you like cats?” The student answered, “Yes, I like.” “Ask Mommy. Mommy, do you like cats?”
  2. Use Gestures and TPR: The mother answered, “Yes, I like.” The teacher shows TPR for ‘say’. “Say, thank you, mommy!”

Technique #2

  1. Keep it short and simple: “This is a cat. What's this?”
  2. Use resources: The teacher encircles the cat. “What’s this?”
  3. Use Gestures and TPR: The teacher shows gesture for ‘say’. “It’s a cat.” The teacher points at her fingers (finger method) without saying anything.

Technique #3

  1. Keep it short and simple: “Where’s mommy? Let’s practice!”
  2. Use resources: The teacher encircles the cat. “What’s this?” The teacher shows an image of a cat via ManyCam.
  3. Use Gestures and TPR: The teacher shows gesture for cat.

Wrap-up

Wrap-up

Technique #1

  1. Keep it short and simple: “Today, we learned…” Encircles the cat. “We sang, we jumped and said, and did all of these!” The teacher encircled items 4-8.
  2. Use Gestures and TPR: The teacher shows gesture for ‘cat’. The teacher points at her fingers. The student says, “It’s a cat.”

Technique #2

  1. Keep it short and simple: ”We learned four animals today. A cat. A dog. A bird. A fish.”
  2. Use resources: The teacher encircles the cat. “What’s this?”

Technique #3

  1. Keep it short and simple: The teacher talks to both the student and the parent. “We learned about 3 animals today!”
  2. Use resources: The teacher encircles the cat. “It’s a cat.” The teacher shows an image of a cat via MayCam.
  3. Use Gestures and TPR: The teacher shows gesture for ‘cat’. “It’s a cat.”

When using AC tools, what parts can we circle or box? (tip: click anywhere in the area)

What instructions can we give during warm - up?

  • Let's sing!
  • Listen to me.
  • Eyes on me.
  • Let's go.
  • Stand up!

True or False for Lead-in / Transition Page

  • We can teach about the animals on this page.
  • We can ask the question, "what's this?"
  • We should only focus on the animals on this page.
  • We can use this line: “Timmy & his parents are at the pet store. Look at the animals! What's this?”
  • We can use this line: "Timmy wants a pet! Let's see what he wants."
  • We can't use this line: "Our lesson is, At the Pet Store! Let’s go!"

Let's start a lesson!

Let's make the student SHINE!

(Engagement) Keep Them Moving

"Take action! An inch of movement will bring you closer to your goals than a mile of intention."

Movement is a powerful teaching tool, and when we as teachers thoughtfully incorporate physical elements into giving instructions, explanations or questions, we elevate the learning experience. When we ask our students to "Jump and Say", we not only let them memorize the pattern in an easier way, but we also distract them, and change their perception from studying something difficult, into enjoying a game with a friend.

According to Leone Dyson, The use of Total Physical Response (TPR) in the classroom in many ways tries to take advantage of this ready-made learning capacity that everyone already has. Think about it, how do parents teach a one year old child "Close, Open"? How do we teach kids when it's time to eat, or drink? You have used TPR in your life. It wasn't necessarily in class, but it was effective. So there's no reason why it wouldn't work with our students. It allows English Language Learners to engage with, practice, and develop knowledge and understanding without relying on on the four macro skills, speaking, listening, reading and writing. TPR makes good use of the student's visual and motor skills. This is why it works best for kids and beginners.

Having fun while learning is basically the concept in which engagement is based on. Movement isn’t a break from learning; movement is learning, and the opportunities for thoughtful exploration is only limited by your imagination and creativity.

Movement at its finest...

What have you observed from the video?

In which parts of the lesson can you ask your students to move?

  • Intro
  • Song
  • Lead
  • Presentation
  • Jump and Say
  • Do and Say
  • Guess and Say
  • What's Missing?
  • Shining Time
  • Wrap Up

(Engagement) Stick to What They Like

"A man will fight harder for his interests than for his rights."

The first step is to know your students interests, and it's all down hill from there. As Rapp & Arndt note in Teaching Everyone, engagement increases any time students are empowered to make their own choices about how they learn materials. Once you have an idea on what your student is passionate about, use those interests as natural motivators to increase engagement. Whether a child is fixated on one thing or has a few areas of intense interest, there are many simple strategies you can use to work those fascinations into your lesson. The result? A happier, more motivated student.

Allow a child to integrate their most-loved characters and possessions into your classroom reading time. Use My Little Pony toys for girls, and an Iron man mask for boys. It would be even better if you can ask the student to grab his or her favorite toy.

Find creative ways to adapt standards-based content to the fun things your students are excited about. If your students fairy tales, then show them pictures of the different pets of Disney princesses.

Complete the summary.

Remember to give your students  to know exactly what they are interested in. Now, make sure to  this information to have consistent engagement with your student. This will ensure a .

What might be an effective strategy for you 6 year old female student?

  • Show a colorful fairy tale book when it is time to read.
  • Wearing a tiara and acting as a princess.
  • Standing up and dancing to rap music.
  • Using the reward system the student chose.
  • Relating the material to real life based on the student's previous stories.
  • Singing the Animal Song as much as 5 times.

(Engagement) It Starts with You

"A teacher affects eternity; he never can never tell where his influence stops."

We've all heard inspirational stories on how teachers affect the lives of people, from helping a student get through tough times, to lives being saved because a teacher paid attention. These are all wonderful stories, but we often forget that teachers affect even the smallest and simplest situations. Your lesson's atmosphere should start from you. If you want a positive, joyful and engaging lesson, then you yourself must feel positive, happy and engaged first.

It can never be the other way around. We are the ones capable of adjusting, that is why the responsibility falls onto us. Being engaging does not always mean being full of energy and having a high pitched voice all the time. It greatly depends on your attitude and emotion towards your lesson, which will natural affect your student and your lesson. 

Try to remember your favorite teacher or professor. Why was he/she your favorite?

Now, try to remember a teacher or professor that you disliked. Why did you dislike him/her?

Leveling our Young Learners

Let's find out how we can identify their level.

If we remember our way of leveling our adult students, there are descriptors we can follow. We have created one for our young students based on research, experience and the 51talk leveling system.

This is what we use to level our students:

We indicate the number of stars based on their performance per category in our lesson. 

Now, using the same tool, let's follow these descriptors for our young learners.

Pronunciation and Intonation:

1 Point:

Student did not have a clear pronunciation & intonation, and there are many mistakes.

2 Points:

Student did not have a very clear pronunciation & intonation, and there are some mistakes.

3 Points: 

Student had a clear pronunciation, some of them are correct, and some of them wrong. And we hope student could have a better intonation.

4 Points: 

Student had a clear pronunciation, most of them are correct, but there are a few mistakes. And we hope student could have a better intonation.

5 Points:

Student had a clear pronunciation & intonation, and all of them are correct. 

Reading Comprehension:

1 Point: 

Student could not understand the reading passage, or use phonics for reading at all. Could not finish reading tasks.

2 Points: 

Student could understand the reading passage, but could not use phonics for reading. Could not read out loud.

3 Points: 

Student could understand the reading passage, and could use some phonics. But could not read fluently, and with many mistakes.

4 Points: 

Student could understand the reading passage, and could use some phonics. Student could read fluently, but with some mistakes.

5 Points

Student could understand the reading passage, and could use some phonics. Student could read fluently, and with almost no mistakes.

Vocabulary:

1 Point:

Student was not familiar with all the words / target language being presented and only produced isolated words. 

2 Points:

Student knew few words presented but demonstrates limited range and control of the target language.

3 Points:

Student was able to talk about the target language but can only convey basic points about the words.

4 Points:

Student had a clear pronunciation, most of them are correct, but there are a few mistakes. And we hope student could have a better intonation.

5 Points:

Student had a clear pronunciation & intonation, and all of them are correct. 

Oral expression:

1 Point:

Student could not interact with teacher, or answer teacher’s questions at all.

2 Points: 

Student could barely interact with teacher, or answer teacher’s questions. But could say some single words

3 Points:

Student could interact with teacher, or answer some of teacher’s questions. But could not express fluently or with many mistakes.

4 Points:

Student could interact with teacher, or answer some of teacher’s questions. Student could express fluently, but with some mistakes.

5 Points:

Student could interact with teacher and answer teacher’s questions fluently with very few mistakes.

Listening comprehension:

1 Point:

Student could not understand teacher’s language, and could not follow teacher’s instructions at all.

2 Points:

Student could not understand most of teacher’s language, and could not follow most of teacher’s instructions. But student could finish a few tasks in the lesson.

3 Points:

Student could understand around half of teacher’s language, and could finish around half of the tasks by following teacher’s instructions.

4 Points:

Student could understand most of teacher’s language, and could finish most of the tasks by following teacher’s instructions.

5 Points:

Student could completely understand teacher’s language, and finish all the tasks by following teacher’s instructions.

True or False

  • Student could not understand most of teacher’s language, and could not follow most of teacher’s instructions. But student could finish a few tasks in the lesson. Student could barely interact with teacher, or answer teacher’s questions. But could say some single words Student could understand the reading passage, but could not use phonics for reading. Could not read out loud. Student did not have a very clear pronunciation & intonation, and there are some mistakes. Student knew few words presented but demonstrates limited range and control of the target language. Therefore, the student is Level 1.
  • Student could not understand teacher’s language, and could not follow teacher’s instructions at all. Student could not interact with teacher, or answer teacher’s questions at all. Student could not understand the reading passage, or use phonics for reading at all. Could not finish reading tasks. Student did not have a clear pronunciation & intonation, and there are many mistakes. Student was not familiar with all the words / target language being presented and only produced isolated words. Therefore, the student is Level 1.
  • Student could not understand teacher’s language, and could not follow teacher’s instructions at all. Student could barely interact with teacher, or answer teacher’s questions. But could say some single words Student could understand the reading passage, but could not use phonics for reading. Could not read out loud. Student did not have a very clear pronunciation & intonation, and there are some mistakes. Student knew few words presented but demonstrates limited range and control of the target language. Therefore, the student is Level 1.
  • Student could not understand teacher’s language, and could not follow teacher’s instructions at all. Student could interact with teacher, or answer some of teacher’s questions. But could not express fluently or with many mistakes. Student could understand the reading passage, but could not use phonics for reading. Could not read out loud. Student did not have a very clear pronunciation & intonation, and there are some mistakes. Student was able to talk about the target language but can only convey basic points about the words. Therefore, the student is Level 1.
  • Student could understand most of teacher’s language, and could finish most of the tasks by following teacher’s instructions. Student could interact with teacher, or answer some of teacher’s questions. Student could express fluently, but with some mistakes. Student could understand the reading passage, and could use some phonics. Student could read fluently, but with some mistakes. Student had a clear pronunciation, most of them are correct, but there are a few mistakes. And we hope student could have a better intonation. Student was able to talk about all the words presented/target language but uses the words with limited flexibility. Therefore, the student is Level 1.
  • Student could understand most of teacher’s language, and could finish most of the tasks by following teacher’s instructions. Student could interact with teacher, or answer some of teacher’s questions. Student could express fluently, but with some mistakes. Student could understand the reading passage, and could use some phonics. Student could read fluently, but with some mistakes. Student had a clear pronunciation, most of them are correct, but there are a few mistakes. And we hope student could have a better intonation. Student was able to talk about all the words presented/target language but uses the words with limited flexibility. Therefore, the student is Level 4.

Choose the right level

Video Analisys

  1. Watch the video.
  2. Figure out the level of the student.
  3. Tick your answer.

  • Level 1
  • Level 0
  • Level 2
  • Level 4

Our Products (Product Knowledge)

What's in store for your students once they enroll?

We offer...

A brand-new English language curriculum with a design of sophistication, covering all levels from K to G6, or from kindergarten to grade six. For each grade, there are eighteen units, each of which contains eight lessons, for a total of 144 sessions for each grade and 1008 for the whole curriculum.

Classic English Junior 4 (CEJ4) design

This course is designed so that it will closely relate to the student's daily life, nature, and the social context which kids at specific ages might come into contact with.


*(Level 0) 

...continued

The course style is also designed according to kid's visual preferences. There are games and other activities that appeal to young learners.



                                                                     *(Level 1 - 3)

...continued

These activities and interaction are ways for us to present new words and target languages. Altogether, they make great training in the four language skills - listening, speaking, reading, writing.


*(Level 4 - 6)

Which designs are included in our CEJ4?

  • It is a brand-new English language curriculum with a design of sophistication.
  • Contents closely related to daily life, nature, and the social context which kids at specific ages might come into contact with.
  • The font styles are easily recognized by the students with it's rounded shapes and big font sizes.
  • The pictures and questions are designed for kids according to their visual preferences.
  • There are games and other activities in the lesson that promotes interactivity and appeal.
  • The characters resemble real life characters that students can relate to.
  • Overall, it's a good training for the four language skills.

CEJ Concept and Objectives

These are what the students should be able to do in these levels.

These are the topics and activities per student level.

What skills do they acquire during their lessons?

  • All-around improvement in listening, speaking, reading and writing skills
  • The mastery of vocabulary, pronunciation, grammar, language forms and knowledge
  • Learning through Communicative Approach *(learning through the use of the real meaning)
  • Learning through CLIL Approach 2 *(Content and language integrated learning)
  • The Key Skills A 21st Century Citizen Must Have

What happens when the finish a grade?

After the completion of each grade, students will be awarded a certificate as a proof of achievement. The Certificate of Completion issued by 51Talk.

Let's Match

  • Level 0
    Can read the alphabet, identify small and capital letters
  • Levels 1 - 3
    Can use every day English to communicate and express personal ideas
  • Levels 4 - 6
    Can communicate freely, and discuss familiar topics

Let's put these in order

Put the course syllabus in order for a level 0 student (ages 3 - 6)

  • Conversation
  • Letter
  • Conversation
  • Review (1)
  • Conversation
  • Letter
  • Conversation
  • Review (2)

What skills do they acquire during their lesson?

  • All-around improvement in listening, speaking, reading and writing skills
  • Comprehensive knowledge of literary arts and sciences
  • Learning through Communicative Approach *(learning through the use of the real meaning)
  • Learning through CLIL Approach 2 *(Content and language integrated learning)
  • The Key Skills A 21st Century Citizen Must Have
  • Essay writing skills for certification exams.
  • The mastery of vocabulary, pronunciation, grammar, language forms and knowledge