AASD 104 Online Writing Activities

This course is about improving your writing and your confidence when it comes to creating papers for your college work. 

Grammar and Mechanics

Types of Sentences

When we talk about the types of sentences, we are looking at the structure of sentences, NOT the length. We will focus specifically on the subjects, the verbs, and the types of conjunctions used (if the sentence has one at all). 


Simple

There are four possibilities.

• One word subject/ one verb

    Ex. Joe works hard.

• More than one word subject/ one verb

    Ex. Joe and Mary work hard.

• One word subject/ more than one verb

    Ex. Joe works out and enjoys the benefits of exercise.

• More than one word subject/ more than one verb

    Ex. Joe and Mary work out and enjoy the benefits of exercise.

Compound

Uses a coordinating conjunction (one of the FANBOYS – see Conjunctions in Parts of Speech) to join two complete sentences


Ex. Kathy loves baseball, so she catches as many games as possible at the stadium in the summer.


In the example, note the comma placed right before the coordinating conjunction "so." It is important that the comma be put in that spot for Compound sentences.

Complex

Uses a subordinating conjunction (see Conjunctions in Parts of Speech) to create a dependent clause. Clauses are groups of words with subjects and verbs in them. That clause joins with an independent clause to create the complex sentence.

Ex. Since Kathy loves baseball, she catches as many games as possible at the stadium in the summer.

In the example, notice the subordinating conjunction "since" begins the dependent clause, which is at the beginning of the sentence. It is important to remember that when the dependent clause is at the beginning, you always put a comma at the end of the clause. In this example, it is after "baseball."

Simple

There are four possibilities.

• One word subject/ one verb

    Ex. Joe works hard.

• More than one word subject/ one verb

    Ex. Joe and Mary work hard.

• One word subject/ more than one verb

    Ex. Joe works out and enjoys the benefits of exercise.

• More than one word subject/ more than one verb

    Ex. Joe and Mary work out and enjoy the benefits of exercise.

Compound

Uses a coordinating conjunction (one of the FANBOYS – see Conjunctions in Parts of Speech) to join two complete sentences


Ex. Kathy loves baseball, so she catches as many games as possible at the stadium in the summer.


In the example, note the comma placed right before the coordinating conjunction "so." It is important that the comma be put in that spot for Compound sentences.

Complex

Uses a subordinating conjunction (see Conjunctions in Parts of Speech) to create a dependent clause. Clauses are groups of words with subjects and verbs in them. That clause joins with an independent clause to create the complex sentence.

Ex. Since Kathy loves baseball, she catches as many games as possible at the stadium in the summer.

In the example, notice the subordinating conjunction "since" begins the dependent clause, which is at the beginning of the sentence. It is important to remember that when the dependent clause is at the beginning, you always put a comma at the end of the clause. In this example, it is after "baseball."

Application

For the following sentence, identify if it is Simple, Compound, or Complex.

The teacher walked into the classroom, greeted the students, and took attendance.

  • Simple
  • Compound
  • Complex

6. Naoki passed the test because he studied hard and understood the material.

  • Complex
  • Simple
  • Compound