Functional Anatomy of the Radioulnar Joints

The radioulnar joints can be found in the forearm, one proximally and one distally, functioning as a pair. They serve to rotate the forearm and hand with assistance from the interosseous membrane which also has an important role in the transmission of forces throughout the upper limb. 

This online learning course is designed to aid your understanding of the anatomy of the radioulnar joints in conjunction with how they function. On the next page you will find the objectives of the course, breaking the topic down into subsections. Work through achieving these objectives in order by clicking on them, reading the information and completing the exercises as they are presented to you. Each of the information sections within the objectives are titled as a question which you should be able to answer to yourself after having read the content. Some exercises are activities designed to use skills such as problem solving, and others are quizzes of varying styles but each will come with their own instructions. These will allow you to test your knowledge more definitively as you get instant feedback. Active participation is required throughout the course which may involve you having to draw, print out a worksheet or perform some simple arm movements so all you should need is a pen and some paper (a printer isn't completely necessary, the worksheets are visible onscreen and fairly simple to reproduce). At each stage you will be directed to exactly where to find the answers but do try to work through the exercises to the best of your ability before checking as this will boost your knowledge and memory of the topic. 

You can take a break at any point by clicking 'take a break' in the top right corner, returning to complete the course at a later time but try to cover each section at some stage as this will provide you with the fullest understanding of the functional anatomy of the radioulnar joints. 

Once you have begun working through an objective, you can navigate through the pages by clicking next at the bottom of each page or by using the arrows in the top right corner which will also allow you to return to a previous page. If you wish to return to the list of objectives whilst in the middle of working through an objective, simply click the house icon in the top left corner.

Check your progress in the top right corner of the home page (where the list of objectives are) and only once you have reached 100% click 'submit results'. Important: only do this once you are sure you are finished otherwise you will lose your progress. 

If you are ready to begin, click 'Start Course' above and enjoy!!

1 - Develop an understanding of the bony anatomy relevant to the radioulnar joints

Introduction

1.1 - Which bones and bony features are involved in the radioulnar joints?

Exercise 1.1 - Labelling diagrams of the bones

Exercise 1.1 - Answers

Exercise 1.2 - quiz!!

–°ombine elements from the left column with the elements on the right
The radial notch can be found on the
 
a thick disc.
The ulnar notch can be found on the
 
medial aspect of the proximal radius.
Of the two bones of the forearm, the radius is the most
 
lateral.
Of the two bones in the forearm, the ulna is the most
 
small and round.
The capitulum articulates with
 
smaller.
Distally, the inferior articular surface of the radius articulates with
 
larger.
Distally, the inferior articular surface of the ulna articulates with
 
the superior surface of the head of the radius.
A bone which does not articulate with either the radius or the ulna is
 
medial.
Of the two ends of the radius, the proximal end is
 
lateral aspect of the distal ulna.
Of the two ends of the ulna, the proximal end is
 
the triquetrum.
The head of the radius can be described as
 
the scaphoid and lunate carpal bones.
The head of the ulna can be described as
 
the articular disc.

2 - To develop a general understanding of the radioulnar joints

Introducing the radioulnar joints

Answers

Quiz

3 - To understand in greater detail the features of the proximal radioulnar joint relevant to its function

Introduction

What is the basic anatomy of the annular ligament?

What are the articular surfaces of the proximal radioulnar joint?

What is the basic anatomy of the joint capsule and synovial membrane at the proximal radioulnar joint?

What are the stabilising features of the proximal radioulnar joint?

Quiz - Question 1

Quiz - Question 2

Quiz - Question 3

Quiz - Question 4

4 - To understand in greater detail the features of the distal radioulnar joint relevant to its function

Introduction

What is the basic anatomy of the articular disc?

What are the articulating surfaces of the distal radioulnar joint?

What is the basic anatomy of the joint capsule and synovial membrane at the distal radioulnar joint?

What are the stabilising features of the distal radioulnar joint?

Quiz - Question 1

Quiz - Question 2

Quiz - Question 3

Quiz - Question 4

5 - To understand the basic anatomy of the interosseous membrane and its functional importance as part of the upper limb

Introduction

What is the basic anatomy of the interosseous membrane?

What is the function of the interosseous membrane?

Answer

6 - To be able to apply the information from the previous objectives in developing an understanding of how the radioulnar joints produce movement in the forearm

Introduction

What is pronation and supination? (Part 1)

What is pronation and supination? (Part 2)

What is the range of movement for rotation of the forearm?

Which muscles are involved in pronation and supination?

Answers

How are the bones moving throughout pronation and supination and what is the axis of movement?

Supplementary information

Quiz - Question 1

  • supinated
  • midprone
  • pronated

Quiz - Question 2

  • pronated
  • supinated
  • midprone

Quiz - Question 3

7 - Expand on knowledge by exploring topic in more detail through own research

Building on what you have learnt...

References

References