Smart Choice Leadership Program

A personal development one-year journey in leadership, tailored to develop emerging leaders within any organisation, utilising seven core elements encapsulated within a personal development journey. Over twelve months the program affords participants the opportunity to develop their network with the leaders of tomorrow building relationships that will transcend careers and enable future success.

Introduction

One Year Journey

One Year Journey

  • Pick a problem to fix or a challenge to overcome?
  • Assisted learning and coaching for one year, following inital two-day training workshop
  • Seven module company focused assignments supported by off-site learning workshops for each module
  • Academic reference and support materials provided
  • Action learning and networking

A personal development one-year journey in leadership, tailored to develop emerging leaders within any organisation, utilising seven core elements encapsulated within a personal development journey. Over twelve months the program affords participants the opportunity to develop their network with the leaders of tomorrow building relationships that will transcend careers and enable future success.

Our decision making capacity

Decision-Making Drives everything

Lorem Ipsum is simply dummy text of the printing and typesetting industry. Lorem Ipsum has been the industry's standard dummy text ever since the 1500s, when an unknown printer took a galley of type and scrambled it to make a type specimen book.

Exercise no. 01

In your workbook, in the context of you and your job, create three lists of a day in the life of you:


List 1 – What you can’t influence and control?

List 2 – What you can influence?

List 3 – What you can control?

30 seconds to complete exercise / flip chart, note down answers that are shouted out / maybe question some that shouldn’t be there, interact with the cohorts 

•List are presented / recorded white boards or flip charts. 

•Participants are asked ‘What is the Difference between the two lists’. 

•Responses are recorded and charted. 

•You have control over what decisions you choose and make! 

•What can the Smart Choice Programme give you influence & control over? – (your decision-making). 

•Are there things you try and influence that you have absolutely no control over ?

Decision-Making styles

Decision making,

  • Yes
  • No

Decision Making - Are you Biased?

  • Munster Rugby
  • Connacht Rugby
  • Leinster Rugby
  • Ulster Rugby

Exercise no. 02 (Personal Reflection)

What type of leader do you want to see?

1.What do you see when you look in the mirror?... 

2.Answer, hopefully yourself assuming you have a good mirror

3.More importantly, if you had a choice, who would you like to see looking back at you? (Bench mark leaders) 

4.What do all these leaders have in common? (Tools, procedures etc.) 

5.Answer, tools, systems, procedures and self-knowledge 

6.Introduce the blank canvas as a metaphor for the journey over the next two days while waving the PDP prop, establish the connection

Align Decision-Making approach within the Organisation

Why aligning with the decision making approach within a organisation is a recipe for success, solidify the team and an entity rather than conflicting styles.

Decision-Making Conditions

Heading 1 text goes here

Lorem Ipsum is simply dummy text of the printing and typesetting industry. Lorem Ipsum has been the industry's standard dummy text ever since the 1500s, when an unknown printer took a galley of type and scrambled it to make a type specimen book.

  • Brexit
  • Sun rises tomorrow

Exercise No. 3

What factors effect your decision-making?

All decision making rests in the balance, somewhere between certain and uncertain.

Within the ‘uncertain’ zone the probabilities and expected outcomes are unknown.

While within the ‘certain’ zone the probabilities and outcomes are much clearer.

Unfortunately most accidents happen when there is a certainty and the COMFORT of that certainty results in bad decision making… A typical component of high risk tolerance cultures.

Factors in the Decision-Making process

Factors in the Decision-Making process

Programmed

Non-programmed

Miracle on the Hudson

Jan 15th 2009 - You may remember a few years ago a pilot had to land a Airbus Jet in the Hudson. Do you remember those pictures of the plane floating in the Hudson. This video will take us through the thinking that Capt Sully Sullenberger went through in making that Safe Choice.”

Miracle on the Hudson

Exercise no. 04 

•What factors did Capt. Sullenberger consider before he decided to land on the Hudson?

•Was this a ‘programmed’ or ‘non-programmed’ decision?

•What steps did he take after he made this analysis?


1)Analyze the Situation - What data/information is available? Engines are lost / I am not going to make it do destination

2) Set Goal: Land the plane (Directive)

3) Understand that there is a plane full of passengers – must make the decision that keeps the most people safe – does the full crew agree? (Behavioral)

4) What are my options? Should I try to make it to nearest airport? / Open field? / Hudson river? (Conceptual)

5)Make the decision – Land in the Hudson (Directive)

6)Rationalize decision - Best chance to have the most survivors (Behavioral)

7) Evaluate/Analyze the decision (Analytical) – If this were to happen again tomorrow, would you have made the same decision?



  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 6

Six Steps in effective Decision-Making

Step 1. Link to the Hudson Video in the Session – Analyze the situation – what the things Capt Sullenberger needed to analyse

Step 2. Like Capt Sullenberger - Set the goal - (Need to land the aircraft )

Step 3. Search for alternatives – What airports are available ?

Step 4. Evaluate the Options – Which is the best place to land ? - Too far – To long

Step 5. Make a Decision – Be decisive - The river- executive the decision

Step 6. Evaluate the Decision – would you take it again – this decision has informed the behavour throughout the world

Untitled content

Heading 1 text goes here

Lorem Ipsum is simply dummy text of the printing and typesetting industry. Lorem Ipsum has been the industry's standard dummy text ever since the 1500s, when an unknown printer took a galley of type and scrambled it to make a type specimen book.

Recap: Effective Decision-Making

Heading 1 text goes here

•Decision-Making is effected by: 

                         –Decision-Making styles 

                         –Biases 

                         –Approach 

                         – Strategic, Transitional, Tactical 

                         –Conditions 

                         – Level of certainty 

                         –Types  

                         – Programmed, non-programmed 

                         –Sector 

•Six steps to effective decision-making • •Strive for balance in decision-making

The Ripple Effect – Decisions and Consequences

What is at the centre of those ripples?” Imagine the button, hit that button, make that decision and what consequences will result from that.

Decisions and consequences = Leadership and consequences!

Connecting the Dots

Exercise no. 05

Focus Points:

        - Every decision we make has a  consequence,            positive or negative

        - Let’s discuss some examples from your                      experience or observations?

 

Setup Mel: Context examples: Ireland v Oz banking

Trump, Brexit, Pat Hickey, Leeds United

Get some of the participants examples and chart both negative and positive consequences out.

The £1billion ripple effect…

•Gerald Ratner, CEO of Ratners, a former global leader in retail jewellery and accessories, addressed a conference of the Institute of Directors at the Royal Albert Hall on 23 April 1991 

•Known in Ireland as H.Samuel 

•Ratner sought advice from colleagues before making the speech

Although widely regarded as "tacky", the shops and their wares were nevertheless extremely popular with the public, until Ratner made a speech addressing a conference of the Institute of Directors at the Royal Albert Hall on 23 April 1991. During the speech, he commented:

“ We also do cut-glass sherry decanters complete with six glasses on a silver-plated tray that your butler can serve you drinks on, all for £4.95. People say, "How can you sell this for such a low price?", I say, "because it's total crap." ”

He compounded this by going on to remark that some of the earrings were "cheaper than an M&S prawn sandwich but probably wouldn't last as long." Ratner's comments have become textbook examples of the folly in contemptuously mocking customers. In the furore that ensued, customers exacted their revenge by staying away from Ratner shops. After the speech, the value of the Ratner group plummeted by around £500 million, which very nearly resulted in the firm's collapse. Ratner sold a majority of the company's shares in an attempt to save his business, but was subsequently fired by the new company leader in November 1992. The group then changed its name to Signet Group in September 1993.

Today, Ratner's speech is still famous in the corporate world as an example of the value of branding and image over quality. Such gaffes are now sometimes called "doing a Ratner", and Ratner himself has acquired the sobriquet "The Sultan of Bling". Ratner has said in his defence that his remarks were not meant to be taken seriously. He also largely blamed the aggressiveness and deliberately wrongful interpretation of several media outlets for the severe consumer reaction.

Note: Not to be shared on the slide; after the speech, the value of the Ratner group plummeted by around £500 million, which resulted in the sale of the firm.

Decisions and Consequences: Leadership

Exercise no. 06

Focus Points: •Observe the consequences • •Observe how Gerald Ratner’s style changed


Decisions and Consequences: Leadership

Exercise no. 06

Focus Points:

            •Observe the consequences 

            •Observe how Gerald Ratner’s style changed


Leadership

Decision-Making

Consequences

Which one of these guys has looked in the mirror ?

Untitled content

Untitled content

Dedicated online training platform

Must-know basics

Bribes and bribery: definitions and penalties

What are bribes and bribery?

Definitions of bribes and bribery in the context of the FCPA include the following:

  • a payment made or offered to in exchange for the illegal granting or promise of favorable terms or outcomes
  • providing, or offering to provide, gifts of any value
  • providing or offering entertainment beyond what would ordinarily be offered to a customer as a courtesy
  • offering personal discounts on products or services not available to the public generally
  • providing or offering company stock 
  • providing or offering employment or consulting positions
  • making payments for bogus services
  • providing free access to company or company-employee property (such as the vacation home of the company president), where such access is not normally provided free of charge 
  • making charitable contributions at the request of, or on behalf of, a government official
  • paying foreign officials to obtain construction permits or other regulatory approvals
  • paying foreign officials to change business regulations or to expedite payment of a tax rebate, even when there is a legal right to the rebate

What kinds of payment may be acceptable?

Facilitating or making payments that are commonly made but that involve discretionary action may be allowed. These so-called "grease" payments are permitted for routine government actions. 

Examples of acceptable ("grease" payments)

Payments made for the following purposes are among those that are commonly allowed: 

  • to obtain permits, licenses, or other official documents to qualify the holder to do business in a foreign country
  • to cover the processing of government papers such as visas and work orders
  • to secure police protection, arrange for mail pick-up and delivery services, or schedule inspections associated with the performance of a contract or the transit of goods across the country in question
  • to cover phone service, the supply of power and water, the loading and unloading of cargo, or the protection of perishable products

Department of Justice quick guidelines

The Department of Justice (DoJ) acknowledges that “a small gift or token of esteem or gratitude is often an appropriate way for business people to display respect for each other.” It suggests the following guidelines:

Travel

The DoJ recommends whichever of the following steps are applicable:

  • Let the foreign government decide who will travel.
  • Minimize expenditures by reimbursing only economy-class airfare.
  • Limit travel to officials (TIP: family members are not officials)
  • Avoid expenditures on side trips and excursions whose primary purpose is pleasure
  • Seek reimbursement only for reasonable expenses genuinely related to the purpose of the trip, and always keep receipts

Entertainment

The DoJ's advice for entertainment is just as clear:

  • Make certain that any entertainment expenses are permitted by local law and custom, and, of course, by company policy. 
  • Document any expenses you plan on claiming back.
  • Make sure that any entertainment you offer customers or business associates cannot be misconstrued as an inducement to award or renew a contract without the appropriate due diligence.

Gifts

And the DoJ stipulates that all gifts you offer must be:

  • given openly and transparently
  • properly recorded
  • given only to show gratitude or esteem
  • permitted under local law

Auditing and accounts

The FCPA requires public companies to make and keep books, records, and accounts that accurately reflect their transactions and the disposition of their assets, and to maintain accounting controls to ensure that:

  • transactions are executed in accordance with management authorization
  • transactions are properly recorded
  • access to assets is permitted only with management authorization
  • accounting records are checked against existing assets at reasonable intervals, and appropriate action is taken to resolve any discrepancies

Expenses: travel and entertainment

The FCPA does not necessarily prohibit travel or ban gifts, but it does proscribe the false presentation of either of these as tokens of appreciation. Any large payment that is made as a gift (in return for which no services or goods are provided) is almost certain to be regarded as a serious and flagrant violation of the relevant FCPA provisions.

Permissible:

Reasonable travel or lodging expenses, incurred by or on behalf of a foreign official and directly related to the promotion, demonstration, or explanation of products or services, or the execution or performance of a contract with a foreign government

Which of the following expenses will be considered violations?

  • A $12,000 birthday trip for a decision-maker that included dinners and visits to wineries
  • Spending $1,000 on phone services, food, travel and other essentials
  • Spending $10,000 on a lavish dinner party for a visting foreign official with little-known family ties to potential customers of yours
  • Arranging for that same foreign official to spend a holiday weeken with your family at an exclusive island resort
  • An all-expenses-paid sightseeing trip to the Swiss Alps for a visiting foreign delegation that includes $2,000 as “pocket money” for each official.
  • Retaining a sales representative to market your company's products in a foreign country and providing sales support such as human resources, office facilities, and transport.
  • A chauffeured junket around London for a government official and their family.

Resources

Approvals matrix

 FCPA Expense Approval Matrix

For any type of expense pertinent to foreign transactions, it is mandatory to seek consent from few personnel. Depending on the type and amount of expense, the number of people to approve the transaction might change. Please take a look at the matrix below to get an idea of who must sign off on what kinds of gifts.

Who should sign off?

Your company is a major manufacturer of home-entertainment equipment, and you are planning a business trip to China to negotiate a contract with a major potential customer. During your visit, you plan to host an event to demo your latest product range to the company's senior management team and members of their families. During the event, you will also present each attendee with a voucher for significant discounts on the top 10 best-selling items being demoed. Indicate which of the roles below would be involved in determining whether the entertainment and gifts are legal, and whether any of the expenses are reimbursable. You may check more than one box, one box, or no boxes.

  • Vice President, Risk Management
  • Head of Legal
  • Finance Manager

Jargon-buster

Download our handy guide to FCPA-speak. It's free!

Here’s a sample of what you'll find:

FCPA Key terms glossary

Companies particpating in the FCPA's new screening program

List of screening-program participants

Check this list to be sure you're doing business with reputable firms. 

Company_List

Decision-maker checklist

Here's a "cheat-sheet checklist" that will help you make determinations about the wisdom, and the legality, of a whole range of expense categories.

Approval form

FCPA_forms

Point of contact in your region

Check your knowledge

"It's on us!"

Test

Untitled content

Dedicated online training platform