Introduction to Color Theory

By the end of these two lessons you are expected to:

• Value the use of the chromatic circle as a simple way to organize colors theoretically and understand their relations.

• Recognize the difference between additive and subtractive color.

• Create a gradient model that illustrates saturation, value and tone variations.

Additive and subtractive systems.

Choose whether the following statement is true or false.

  • The additive system is mainly used in print media.

Choose whether the following statement is true or false.

  • The additive system's primary colors are red, green and blue (RGB).

Choose whether the following statement is true or false.

  • The additive system's primary colors are mainly used for light screens such as computers, tablets, television, mobile phones and movies.

Choose whether the following statement is true or false.

  • The primary colors for print media are red, yellow and blue.

Choose whether the following statement is true or false.

  • Depending on the color system, you can obtain white by mixing all the primary colors.

Choose whether the following statement is true or false.

  • Books and magazines are printed using RGB.

Choose whether the following statement is true or false.

  • In CMYK, the "C" means "color".

Choose whether the following statement is true or false.

  • Inkjet and pigment colors are both subtractive.

Choose whether the following statement is true or false.

  • The subtractive system explains that light is invisible and it can't have any color at all.

Choose whether the following statement is true or false.

  • You can get black by mixing cyan, magenta and yellow.

The Color Wheel.

The Chromatic Circle

Organizing a Chromatic Circle

Choose a partner and use the Prezi presentation to look up the specific information needed to complete the following tasks:

1- Cut and paste the chromatic circle puzzle pieces on the the chromatic circle template worksheet.

2- Label each color with its appropriate name.

3- Divide the circle in half to indicate where warm and cool coors begin and end.

4- Decide if this chromatic circle is an example of additive or subtractive color. Justify your answer.

Color Mixing Terms.

The colors were mixed well!

Talk with your partner and transform the following sentences to the passive voice. Use the knoweldge learned during the previous lessons. Remember to identify the object and subject. Remembert to use participles.

Examples: 

The artist mixes the colors.                           --->                The colors are mixed by the artist.

The artist doesn't mix the colors.              --->                The colors are not mixed by the artist.

Does the artist mix the colors?                    --->                Are the colors mixed by the artist?

Doesn't the artist mix the colors?              --->                Aren't the colors mixed by the artist?

1. She organizes the hues of the chromatic circle.

2. The painter does not like those whitish tints!

3. Do students use gray tones?

4. Don't artist create shades?

5. Saturation makes an image brighter and more colorful.

6. Desaturation makes an image dull.



                                                                          *** Well done! ***



Now tell your partner a sentence using yourself as the subject. 

Example: 

I paint saturated rainbows.                         --->            Saturated rainbows are painted by me.



Color Theory and Marketing Strategies.

The Power of Color for Brands.

The Power of Color for Brands

Brands and color are inextricably linked because color offers an instantaneous method for conveying meaning and message without words.

Color is the visual component people remember most about a brand followed closely by shapes, symbols then numbers and finally words. For example, the real McDonald's is easy to detect in the image below.


People see color before they absorb anything else.

Many of the most recognizable brands in the world rely on color as a key factor in their instant recognition. Research has reinforced that 60% of the time people will decide if they are attracted or not to a message based on color alone! Color increases brand recognition by up to 80 percent.


This excerpt was taken from an article written by Jill Morton, color psychologist and branding expert at Colorcom ¬©Jill Morton, 2012, All rights reserved / Protected by Copyscape

#This_Is_What_I_Think!



Create three hashtags that summarize the excerpt you just read. Be ready to share with the class.