The Beauty of the Solar System by Cadence Design Systems

Here is where I would add some introduction text or a video or some audio.

Planets of the Solar System

The Eight Planets Tour

In this video Paxi takes you on a tour of our Solar System, visiting all eight planets and other minor bodies such as asteroids, comets and the dwarf planet Pluto.

​Join Paxi on a journey through our Solar System, from the rocky inner planets close to the Sun, past the giant planets to the freezing edge, the home of comets.

 

Can you name the planets?

  • Mercury
  • Venus
  • Earth
  • Mars
  • Jupiter
  • Saturn
  • Uranus
  • Neptune

Find the "Gas Giants"

Order the planets according to their distance from the Sun

  • Mercury
  • Venus
  • Earth
  • Mars
  • Jupiter
  • Saturn
  • Uranus
  • Neptun

Thanks and see you at the next astronomy lesson!

Your homework is to select a planet you like most, find some interesting facts about it and be ready to present these facts in class.

Cadence Design Content Section

DC Analysis

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Module Objectives

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Terms and Definitions

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What are Large-Signal Analyses

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Determining the Operating Point Information in Spectre Command-line

What is DC Analysis

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DC analysis finds solutions to the systems of equation that describe circuits that are constant valued. It does so by simply discarding time derivatives (as the solution is constant valued, its time derivative must be zero). These constant-valued solutions are the equilibrium points of the circuit.

Equilibrium points are constant-valued operating points. In other words, equilibrium points are solutions that do not change with time.

 •A stable equilibrium point is such that if a circuit is perturbed slightly while sitting at a stable equilibrium point, it will eventually return to it. However, when disturbed, a circuit will not return to an unstable equilibrium point. •Non-isolated solutions are those where there are a continuum of solutions. 

DC analysis does not distinguish between stable and unstable equilibrium points and is just as likely to output an unstable equilibrium point as a stable one.

If the stimulus is still changing, then a circuit cannot reach an equilibrium point. So the first step of a DC analysis is to configure the independent sources so they are constant.

In the latch circuit example above, there are 3 equilibrium points:

 •The first two solutions with Output (Q) being high (Vcc) and low (0) are stable. •The last equilibrium point is unstable, meaning any perturbation causes the voltages to drift away from this solution and eventually ends up at one of the other two solutions. 

The DC solution computed is not necessarily unique nor is it required to be stable.