Online Certification Training

Welcome to the faculty online certification training for Piedmont College. In addition to completing the training program outlined below, faculty pursuing the Faculty Certificate in Hybrid Teaching shall design, develop, and successfully implement a complete hybrid course aligned with Piedmont College’s Standards for Hybrid Course Design. Faculty participants will receive hands-on assistance during all stages of this process as needed. Dr. Kenyon Gannon, Distance Learning Coordinator for Piedmont College, along with a review committee designated by the Vice President for Academic Affairs, will evaluate courses according to a rubric currently being developed by the Instructional Technology Committee.

When you've finished taking this short course, you will be able to:Daniel Hall, Demorest Campus

You will be given multiple opportunities to correctly answer module questions throughout your training.  Please be certain to answer correctly before moving forward as your results will be recorded. 

Lastly, your feedback at the duration of your training is welcome and much appreciated.   

Please click "Start course" to begin your training.

MODULE 1-SELECTING COURSE MATERIALS

MODULE 1 LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

Learn how to select and implement appropriate course materials:  

a)  Course Goals and Objectives 

b)  Essential Content

c)  The Online Syllabus 

d)  Structuring Your Hybrid Course

Course Goals and Objectives

The goals and objectives of each online or hybrid Goals and Objectives Pyramid course should be meaningful and measurable and should be clearly communicated to your students.   Be sure to reinforce objectives throughout the duration of the course.


Course Goals

Course goals, or learning goals, are statements which identify the broad student learning outcomes you expect your students to achieve by the end of your course and help keep the focus of instruction on the targeted content. These are typically included in the course syllabus in your description/course overview and are followed by individual learning objectives.  Learning goals describe the topics covered, the method of content delivery, and what the learners should achieve by taking the course.It is also common practice to include a statement about how the course aligns with the overall program.  Course goals should be:

  • Broad
  • Long-term
  • Achievable
  • Realistic

Learning Objectives/Course Standards

Learning objectives, or course standards, include multiple specific, measurable student learning outcomes students should successfully achieve in order to meet the course goal.  Student mastery of the course standards is measured as students demonstrate their knowledge and understanding.  Course learning objectives should be:

  • Precise
  • Specific
  • Measurable
  • Learner-centered
  • Mid to short-term

Match the terms with the appropriate characteristics:

  • Course Goal
    long-term, achievable, realistic
  • Learning Objective
    specific, learner-centered, precise
  • Broad
    Course Goal
  • Measurable
    Learning Objective

Essential Content

Only the Essentials...

When planning for online instruction, make certain you plan to use only that which is necessary to teach your course objectives.   Why?  Online courses, in comparison to face-to-face instruction, pose a set of unique constraints and challenges (accessibility, learning gap, and web connection to name a few).

Consider, for a moment, a course that you teach regularly.

     ~How does a focus on essential content affect your own course? (Consider standard prioritization, pacing, scaffolding)

     ~Can anything be removed while still attaining outcomes?

As you plan, review all of your course materials.

     ~Are all course objectives represented

     ~Are there extraneous materials that could be removed? 

     ~Are there instances of bias?

Content Requirements from the Piedmont College Online & Hybrid Course Evaluation Checklist:

(Full PDF Checklist Available at the End of Module 1)

Content:

  • 2.1   Course goals and objectives are measurable, easy to understand, and clearly articulated.
  • 2.2   Objectives are conspicuous and appropriately located within the course's design structure.
  • 2.3   Content and assignments align with program standards, course objectives, and desired learning outcomes.
  • 2.4   Content supplies sufficient depth and breadth to adequately cover the topic being addressed.
  • 2.5   Course materials, activities, and assessments are appropriate for the academic level of the course and support rigor and student engagement.
  • 2.6   Content is conspicuously provided and easily accessible by students.
  • 2.7   Course materials reflect multiculturalism and do not contain bias.
  • 2.8   Course materials are free of advertising.
  • 2.9   The course uses a variety of multimedia content resources to enhance student engagement.
  • 2.10 All content complies with the doctrine of fair use and does not infringe upon copyright protections.

The Online Syllabus

Engage Students Through Your Syllabus:

Think of your online syllabus as a supplement to your traditional syllabus.  Ask yourself, "What would an online student really to know and have fast access to?"  Make sure it is always available to students online and use the fact that it is an online syllabus to your advantage.  Make it engaging and interactive.  Be careful to include all information as required by Piedmont College.  Refer to the Syllabus Boilerplate PDF below:

ONL-HYB 16-17 SYLLABUS BOILERPLATE

Take the “Spice it up!” challenge! 

Use multimedia to appeal to younger audiences. Try these examples:

  • Record a podcast or video highlighting key pieces of the syllabus. 
  • Record a screencast showing students how to navigate basic content resources.

Ponder some of the suggestions from California State University, Northridge Professor Randi Picarelli in the video shown to the right.

Things to Consider:

~What technology tools/knowledge are required?

~Do all students have access?

~What counts as attendance and participation? 

  • Typically based on meeting objectives rather than seat time (in fully online courses). 
  • Important due to issues with motivation/self-discipline. 
  • What support are you willing/able to provide as the instructor?

~Have a basic plan for interaction. 

  • How (and how often) will students communicate with you and their classmates? Do they have the tools to do this? Is there a learning curve? 
  • Structured opportunities for interaction. 
  • Design for “presence”.

~Rules for interaction 

  • Take steps to promote professional, “safe” interactions. 
  • Have a set of communication ground rules. (Or have students create one together.)

~Be explicit about copyright. 

  • Let students know your expectations. 
  • Provide easy ways to “do the right thing” rather than plagiarize. 
  • Google images are not necessarily free to use just because we find them that way!

~Creative Commons

Content Requirements from the Piedmont College Online & Hybrid Course Evaluation Checklist:

 (Full PDF Checklist Available at the End of Module 1)

Course Introduction:  

  • 1.1   A course syllabus and overview are provided for students. These should be clear and comprehensive.
  • 1.2   Students are notified of all technology requirements prior to the course start date.
  • 1.3   Expectations for participation are clearly articulated.
  • 1.4   Expectations for academic integrity and plagiarism are clearly articulated.
  • 1.5   Students are taught how to locate information and resources required for the course.
  • 1.6   Guidelines for the appropriate use of copyrighted materials are provided.
  • 1.7   Students have an opportunity, through ungraded activities, to meet other students virtually prior to the course start date.
  • 1.8    Students have an opportunity, through ungraded activities, to become familiar with various technology tools used in the course.

Communication:

  • 4.1   Clear instructions for communicating with the instructor and other students during the course are provided.
  • 4.2   Expectations for netiquette (standards for online behavior and communication) are clearly articulated.
  • 4.3   Expectations for professional interactions/collaboration free from discrimination and respectful of diverse opinions are easy to understand and clearly communicated.
  • 4.4   Structured opportunities for instructor-student and student-student interactions to achieve course goals are provided.
  • 4.5   Specific online communication activities are designed to ensure student engagement and support a community of learning throughout the course.
  • 4.6   Students know how to get help, ask questions, and/or pursue supplemental learning opportunities.
  • 4.7   Effective and professional communication skills are specifically addressed and incorporated throughout the course.
  • 4.8   Privacy policies are clearly articulated.
  • 4.9   Instructor feedback on activities and assessments is provided in a timely fashion.

Technology:

  • 6.1   Technology requirements for the course are clearly articulated. These include hardware, software, and Internet requirements.
  • 6.2   Prerequisite technology skills are clearly articulated.
  • 6.3   Instruction and/or tutorials for prerequisite technology skills are provided where necessary.
  • 6.4   Course design reflects standards for interoperability (the ability to deploy learning objects across a range of software tools and platforms) and compatibility.
  • 6.5   Technology tools are appropriate for the content and level of the course.
  • 6.6   Rich and engaging multimedia tools are employed to allow students varied opportunities to access and acquire mastery of course content.
  • 6.7   Navigation is clear and consistently presented.
  • 6.8   Clear statements communicating copyright and licensing status of tools and resources are presented.
  • 6.9   Course is conceptualized according to universal design principles. Course design and resources conform to W3C’s Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG 2.0). These guidelines support accessibility for learners with diverse needs and can be located at www.w3c.org.
  • 6.10 All rights afforded to students by the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) are respected.

Answer the following questions related to course content.

  • Use only that which is necessary for teaching your learning objectives when planning for instruction.
  • Biases and extraneous materials need not be considered when planning for instruction.

Which of the following online syllabus features are suggested to appeal to online students? (Mark all that are correct).

  • Color
  • Black and white text only
  • Interactivity
  • Multimedia

Structuring Your Online or Hybrid Course

Best Practices Considerations For Course Structure

A number of experts agree that distance learning courses should be designed following organizational guidelines in the UMT approach.  

Arrange your content by units and then divide into associated modules. Modules are further subdivided into topics. Each topic teaches an objective. 

Read more about distance education and the U.M.T. approach in the linked irma-international article-Best Practices for Designing Distance Education and the U-M-T Approachby Michael Simonson.

Use one of the following designs:

Linear Design

Topic 1 -> Self-Test 1 -> Topic 2 -> Self-Test 2, ... 

  • Objectives for each module are clearly communicated. 
  • Easy to design, implement, and modify. 
  • Weakness: decreases student choice, could negatively affect motivation for some.


Branch Design

Similar to linear 

  • Objectives for each module are clearly communicated. 
  • Students may be directed to additional support materials or advanced content based on performance.

Content Requirements from the Piedmont College Online & Hybrid Course Evaluation Checklist:

 (Full PDF of Checklist Available at the End of Module 1)

Instructional Design:

  • 3.1   Course design adheres to a logical structure.
    • 3.1.1   Content is organized around units ordered in logical sequence.
    • 3.1.1   Units are comprised of lessons ordered in logical sequence.
    • 3.1.3   Each unit and lesson presents a description of objectives, resources, activities, assignments, and assessments. This description guides and introduces the student to the unit and/or lesson.
    • 3.1.4   Unit descriptions clearly articulate connections with course and program objectives.
    • 3.1.5   Lesson descriptions clearly articulate desired student learning outcomes for the lesson.
  • 3.2   Each lesson contains multiple and varied opportunities for students to acquire mastery of the content.
  • 3.3   Course design reflects an understanding of diverse student needs.
  • 3.4   Course activities are engaging and promote active learning.
  • 3.5   Activities and assessments promote higher-order thinking and critical reasoning.

Drag and drop the text below in the correct order to illustrate the UMT approach to course design.

  • East semester unit credit = 1 unit
  • East unit = 3 to 5 modules
  • East module = 3 to 5 topics
  • Each topic = 1 learning outcome

On Your Own...

Great Work So Far!

Before moving on to module 2, please take some time to plan for your online course.  Refer to the full Piedmont College Online & Hybrid Course Evaluation Checklist below as you work.  Complete the following two activities:

  • Begin to draft your online course syllabus. 
  • Select one of your course units and structure it for an online format (i.e. UMT approach).

Online Course Evaluation Checklist

MODULE 2: SUSTAINING VIRTUAL COMMUNITIES

MODULE 2 LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

Understand and apply methods to encourage and sustain a virtual community:

a)  How to Communicate for a Community 

b)  Social Presence 

c)  Teaching Strategies to Promote Social Presence

d)  Environment

e)  Tech Tools for Social Presence

f)   Privacy Considerations

Communicating for a Community

Building an Online Community:

In planning an online or hybrid course, it is essential you consider how you will address engagement, motivation, and student retention. Student perception is key!  Essentially you are bridging the communication gap that naturally occurs when not in a face-to-face teaching and learning environment. Review your plan for interactions within the course and ask yourself:

  • Is it feasible and reasonable for both you and the students?

Review the Standards for Communication in the Piedmont College 

Online & Hybrid Course Evaluation Checklist:

(The full PDF the checklist can be found below standard 4 communication requirements.)

  • 4.1   Clear instructions for communicating with the instructor and other students during the course are provided.
  • 4.2   Expectations for netiquette (standards for online behavior and communication) are clearly articulated.
  • 4.3   Expectations for professional interactions/collaboration free from discrimination and respectful of diverse opinions are easy to understand and clearly communicated.
  • 4.4   Structured opportunities for instructor-student and student-student interactions to achieve course goals are provided.
  • 4.5   Specific online communication activities are designed to ensure student engagement and support a community of learning throughout the course.
  • 4.6   Students know how to get help, ask questions, and/or pursue supplemental learning opportunities.
  • 4.7   Effective and professional communication skills are specifically addressed and incorporated throughout the course.
  • 4.8   Privacy policies are clearly articulated.
  • 4.9   Instructor feedback on activities and assessments is provided in a timely fashion.

Online Course Evaluation Checklist

Social Presence

Designing for Social Presence

Are you perceived as a “real” person online? Do students perceive they are interacting with a community of learners?  Consider the following three communication types when designing for social presence.  Each relies on timely feedback and response.

Affective

■ Humor (as appropriate)

■ Emotional expression

■ Self-disclosure

Interactive

■ Quoting others within the course

■ Referencing the contributions of others within the course

■ Asking questions

■ Showing agreement (or disagreement)

■ Showing appreciation

Cohesive

■ Using greetings

■ Using collective language to address/represent the class

■ Sharing resources with the class

■ Asking questions of the class

As You Plan...

Develop an instructor interaction plan.

  • How often will you provide new content?
  • What is your preferred means of interaction?
  • What is your time frame for responding to students? 
  • Grading assignments?– How often will you look at or contribute to discussions?

What should you consider when planning an online or hybrid course in order to build your online community? Select all correct answers.

  • Student engagement
  • Student motivation
  • Student retention
  • Student perception

True/False:

  • Your plan for interactions within a course should be both feasible and reasonable for both you and your students.

True/False:

  • Timely feedback and response are unimportant considerations for establishing social presence.

Select the appropriate communication type from the drop down menus provided:

  1. Quoting others within your course, referencing the contribution of others, and showing agreement or disagreement are all examples of communication for social presence.
  2. Using humor, disclosure, and emotional expression are examples of  communication for social presence.
  3. Using greetings and collective language, sharing resources, and asking questions are examples of communication for social presence.

Teaching Strategies to Promote Social Presence

Tips to Ponder to Promote Social Presence

■ Tell students your goals for community.

■ Ask students to share their own expectations of the course.

■ If possible, have an initial face-to-face meeting (highly recommended).

■ Require collaboration.

■ Assign a “Getting to know you” forum.

■ Consider several, non-graded, collaborative activities at beginning of course.

■ Assign task-oriented discussions (e.g.problem solving scenarios).

■ Peer critique.

■ Group projects– Give timelines and check on progress frequently.

■ Use social networking tools such as blogging, SMS (e.g.www.remind.com), and back channels (e.g. www.todaysmeet.com).

■ Schedule synchronous (or asynchronous) debates.

■ Invite expert and/or guest speakers to live sessions.

■ Post weekly Q&A videos answering common student questions.


Environment

A Note on Environment

■ Use a mix of synchronous (when possible) and asynchronous tools.

■ Provide user-friendly virtual spaces for student collaboration.

■ Frequently monitor interactions to ensure a “safe space” for learning.

True/False:

  • Whenever possible, you should use both synchronous and asynchronous meetings and tools to build an effective online environment.
  • It is not necessary to frequently monitor interactions among online participants.

Virtual Tools for Your Toolbelt

Try These Virtual Tools

Consider incorporating a number of the tech tools listed below to promote social presence in your online or hybrid courses.

Remember, multimedia can make learning fun and engaging, but should be used as a vehicle to deliver relevant content and sound instruction.

Synchronous Tools

– Skype

– Blackboard Collaborate

– Zoom

– Gotomeeting

– Adobe Connect

– Facetime

– Google chat/video


Asynchronous Tools

– Moodle

– YouTube

– Vimeo

– Voicethread

– Edmodo

– Soundcloud

– Google Documents

– Creately

Considering Privacy

Things You Should Consider in Regard to Privacy: 

■ Have you vetted the technology tools you will recommend?

■ Are your preferred tools password-protected? Who can access the data?

■ How do students engage with these tools?

■ What are your requirements for due diligence?

Next Steps...

You are Doing Great!

Before moving on to module 3, please take some time to review the objectives and content resources for your selected course unit.   Consider the following question:

  • What are some ways you can design for social presence (instructor and student) to support your learning goals?

MODULE 3: ENGAGING ACTIVITIES FOR HIGHER ORDER THINKING

MODULE 3 LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

Recognize and create engaging activities to promote higher order thinking in an online course:

a)  Motivate and Engage by Creating Activities that POP!

b)  Meeting the Diverse Needs of all Learners

c)  TEC-VARIETY Framework

Motivate and Engage

Ensure Success With the Infusion of Motivational Best Practices:

How do we ensure success in online programs?  The key lies in motivating and engaging our students. Gain student attention with rich digital media, games, and simulations that enhance learning and support your instructional standards.  Remember to keep in mind the diverse needs of all learners during your planning for instruction.  Offer close-captioning where applicable as well as alternative tools in order to provide fair access and equal opportunities to all students and meet ADA compliance. Use authentic activities and assessments to develop critical thinking skills.

Motivation, both intrinsic and extrinsic, "is central to all things human...[including] online teaching and learning" (Bonk and Khoo, 2014).   Curtis Bonk and Elaine Khoo offer a framework as a tonic to lackluster instruction and the lack of meaningful engagement.  In their free E-book Adding Some TEC-VARIETY , available for download at http://tec-variety.com/, ten motivational practices are outlined to equip educators to inspire and engage their students.   

We will highlight these ten practices, from the aforementioned framework, in the next page of this module:

Bonk and Khoo: TEC-VARIETY Framework for Motivation and Engagement

TEC-VARIETY motivation framework strategies

1. Tone/Climate: Psych Safety, Comfort, Sense of Belonging

2. Encouragement: Feedback, Responsive, Praise, Supports

3. Curiosity: Surprise, Intrigue, Unknowns

4. Variety: Novelty, Fun, Fantasy

5. Autonomy: Choice, Control, Flexibility, Opportunities

6. Relevance: Meaningful, Authentic, Interesting

7. Interactivity: Collaborative, Team-Based, Community

8. Engagement: Effort, Involvement, Investment

9. Tension: Challenge, Dissonance, Controversy

10. Yielding Products: Goal Driven, Purposeful Vision, Ownership

OneTONE/CLIMATE

■ Establish the personalized “feel” for your course 

–Video introductions 

–Spice it up! Challenge 

–Affect/Interaction/Cohesion

Two

ENCOURAGEMENT

■Providing academic and personal support

–Screencasts/tutorials

–Online self-testing/formative assessment

–Multimedia scenarios

–Polling/Surveying

■SurveyMonkey

■Moodle “questionnaire”

■PollEverywhere

■Socrative (very popular in K12)

Three

CURIOSITY (AND FUN)

■Online News (i.e. “This week in Nursing news…”

■Video Conferencing

■Follow key figures on social media

■Create animations, movies, etc.

–Xtranormal, GoAnimate, toondoo

Four

VARIETY

■Engage students as resource providers

■Demo new products/ideas (e.g. highlights from professional conferences)

■Q&A sessions with guest experts

■Recorded webinars

–Skype, Google Hangouts, etc.

Five

AUTONOMY/CHOICE

■Student searches for online resources (with a different student(s) presenting each week

–Students provide links to online resources for other students

■Create an onilne video playlist, giving students options (e.g. 3 out of 10 videos)

–Khan Academy, learnzillion.com, YouTube, Vimeo, etc.

■Webquests and other web exploration assignments

–Zunal.com

Six

RELEVANCE/MEANINGFULNESS

■Online case studies employing multimedia

■Online virtual tours (e.g. virtual lab tours)

■Online simulations

Seven

INTERACTIVE

■Video annotations and discussions

–YouTube, openvideoannotation.org, anvil-software.org

■Learner self-reflection

■Social Media (e.g. Twitter)

■Collaborative Documents (e.g. Google Docs, Creately)

■Mobile Inquiry-Based Learning

–GroupMeet

                                       –Discussion Forums (e.g. Moodle, Voicethread, Voxer)

Eight

ENGAGEMENT/EFFORT (Making Connections)

■Flash video

■3D vizualization, laboratory software (e.g. BioDigital.com)

■Virtual Timelines (e.g. Dippity)

■Concept/Mind mapping (e.g. Creately)

■Virtual Field Trips

–Consider new “live” video streaming tools such as Periscope

Nine

TENSION/CHALLENGE

■Ethical Debates

■Photo Festivals

■Competitions

Ten

YIELD (What Students Produce)

■Youtube videos

■Video Blogs

■Podcasts

■Online journals

True/False:

  • ADA compliance is not a concern for instructors developing online course content.
  • The key to student success in an online learning environment is the incorporation of activities that both engage and motivate students.

Which motivational principle addresses psych safety, comfort, and sense of belonging?

Which motivational principle addresses effort, involvement, and investment?

Which motivational principle addresses choice, control, flexibility, and opportunities?

Next Steps...

Take the Next Steps:

Great work on modules 1-3.  You are ready to move on.

MODULE 4: DESIGN AND IMPLEMENT YOUR OWN COURSE

Let's Review

Let's Review so You Can Take Your Course to the Information Superhighway?

Click the following hotspots for some important reminders:

Time to Submit Your Results and Build Your Course

High Five! You have completed the Online Certification Training Course. REMEMBER: Please submit your results on the home page before you exit the course. Happy designing!